Terrorism Funding: FY2002 Appropriation Bills

Much of the enormous economic costs of the September 11 terrorist attacks will be addressed in the regular 13 FY2002 appropriations bills, plus allocations of the $40 billion emergency supplemental spending measure signed into law on September 18 ( P.L. 107-38 ). Using baseline data provided by the Office of Management and Budget, this report organizes and tracks U.S. spending to combat terrorism across the 13 appropriation bills, including amounts allocated from the $40 billion emergency supplemental. Each of the FY2002 spending measures includes money for terrorism- related activities, although the amount varies widely among the 13 bills. Over 80% of the estimated $11 billion requested for FY2002 to combat terrorism falls in two appropriation measures: the Defense Department appropriation and the Departments of Commerce, Justice, State, the Judiciary and Related Agencies appropriation. Initial allocations -- totaling $8.8 billion to date -- from the emergency supplemental appropriation have also augmented programs aimed at recovering from and responding to the terrorist attacks falling under the jurisdiction of each of the 13 appropriation measures. Activities funded in the Defense and Military Construction spending measures have received 62% of the allocations, while the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), funded in the Veterans/HUD appropriation bill, received 23%. Table 1 provides a summary for each bill and a total for all 13. Tables 2 through 13 present separate pages for each appropriation measure, listing in most cases spending at the account level. There are significant limitations in identifying precise amounts included in appropriation bill accounts for terrorism-related activities. Some result from the way in which OMB organizes its data around categories that do not necessarily correspond to appropriation accounts. In many cases, terrorism-related resources are co-mingled in a "host" account with other funds with no precise designation of amounts to combat terrorism. OMB data for defense and military construction appropriations are not disaggregated and are provided in only very broad categories. Nevertheless, data presented in this report indicate where funds are concentrated and highlight new spending initiatives that have emerged since September 11.

Order Code RL31168 CRS Report for Congress Received through the CRS Web Terrorism Funding: FY2002 Appropriation Bills October 25, 2001 name redacted Specialist in Foreign Affairs Foreign Affairs, Defense, and Trade Division Congressional Research Service ˜ The Library of Congress Terrorism Funding: FY2002 Appropriation Bills Summary Much of the enormous economic costs of the September 11 terrorist attacks will be addressed in the regular 13 FY2002 appropriations bills, plus allocations of the $40 billion emergency supplemental spending measure signed into law on September 18 (P.L. 107-38). Using baseline data provided by the Office of Management and Budget, this report organizes and tracks U.S. spending to combat terrorism across the 13 appropriation bills, including amounts allocated from the $40 billion emergency supplemental. Each of the FY2002 spending measures includes money for terrorismrelated activities, although the amount varies widely among the 13 bills. Over 80% of the estimated $11 billion requested for FY2002 to combat terrorism falls in two appropriation measures: the Defense Department appropriation and the Departments of Commerce, Justice, State, the Judiciary and Related Agencies appropriation. Initial allocations – totaling $8.8 billion to date – from the emergency supplemental appropriation have also augmented programs aimed at recovering from and responding to the terrorist attacks falling under the jurisdiction of each of the 13 appropriation measures. Activities funded in the Defense and Military Construction spending measures have received 62% of the allocations, while the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), funded in the Veterans/HUD appropriation bill, received 23%. Table 1 provides a summary for each bill and a total for all 13. Tables 2 through 13 present separate pages for each appropriation measure, listing in most cases spending at the account level. There are significant limitations in identifying precise amounts included in appropriation bill accounts for terrorism-related activities. Some result from the way in which OMB organizes its data around categories that do not necessarily correspond to appropriation accounts. In many cases, terrorism-related resources are co-mingled in a “host” account with other funds with no precise designation of amounts to combat terrorism. OMB data for defense and military construction appropriations are not disaggregated and are provided in only very broad categories. Nevertheless, data presented in this report indicate where funds are concentrated and highlight new spending initiatives that have emerged since September 11. Contents Funding Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Methodology and Limitations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 List of Figures List of Tables Table 1. Combating Terrorism Appropriations Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Table 2. Agriculture and Related Agencies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Table 3. Commerce, Justice, and State, the Judiciary, and Related Agencies . . . 8 Table 4. Defense and Military Construction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Table 5. District of Columbia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 Table 6. Energy and Water Development . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 Table 7. Foreign Operations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Table 8. Interior and Related Agencies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 Table 9. Labor, Health and Human Services, and Education . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 Table 10. Legislative Branch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 Table 11. Transportation and Related Agencies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 Table 12. Treasury, Postal Service, Executive Office of the President, and General Government . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 Table 13. Veterans Affairs, Housing and Urban Development, and Independent Agencies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 Terrorism Funding: FY2002 Appropriation Bills Funding Overview Much of the enormous economic cost of the September 11 terrorist attacks will be funded in the 13 regular FY2002 appropriations bills and through allocations of the $40 billion FY2001 emergency supplemental spending measure signed into law on September 18 (P.L. 107-38). This report organizes and tracks U.S. spending to combat terrorism across the 13 appropriation bills, including amounts allocated from the $40 billion emergency supplemental. Each of the FY2002 spending measures includes money for terrorism-related activities, although the amount varies widely among the 13 bills. As shown in Table 1, over 80% of the estimated $11 billion requested for FY2002 to combat terrorism falls in two appropriation measures: the Defense Department and the Departments of Commerce, Justice, State, the Judiciary and Related Agencies. Initial allocations – totaling $8.8 billion so far – from the emergency supplemental appropriation have also augmented programs aimed at recovering from and responding to the terrorist attacks falling under the jurisdiction of each of the 13 appropriation measures. Activities funded in the Defense and Military Construction spending measures have received 62% of the allocations, while the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), funded in the Veterans/HUD appropriation bill, received 23%. Table 1 provides a summary for each bill and a total for all 13. Tables 2 through 13 present separate pages for each appropriation measure, listing in most cases spending at the account level. The data provide amounts enacted for FY2001, proposed for FY2002, and where possible, levels approved in House and Senate FY2002 appropriation bills. Figures specifically supporting efforts to combat terrorism are set out in bold type and totaled at the bottom of each appropriation bill entry. In addition, the tables include details on the initial $8.6 billion allocations made from the $40 billion emergency supplemental appropriation. These amounts are listed near the bottom and in the far right column of each page for the 13 spending bills.1 1 These tables focus on discretionary spending – that is, money provided as budget authority in appropriation bills – to combat terrorism. There will also be considerable costs within entitlement programs, such as increases in unemployment insurance claims, associated with recovery efforts from the September 11 attacks. These non-discretionary, entitlement expenditures are not addressed in this report. CRS-2 As noted below, there are significant limitations in identifying precise amounts included in appropriation bill accounts for terrorism-related activities. Nevertheless, data presented in this report indicate where funds are concentrated and identify new spending initiatives that have emerged since September 11. Methodology and Limitations Funding for programs to combat terrorism have been loosely coordinated and documented in an annual report to Congress by the Office of Management and Budget (OMB).2 OMB presents the data in two ways: according to spending by each Federal agency and according to five “mission” categories. OMB defines the five categories as follows: ! Physical security of government – programs protecting Federally owned, leased or occupied facilities and Federal employees from terrorist acts. ! Physical security of the national populace – activities protecting national infrastructure, including air traffic, railroad, highway, maritime, and electronic distribution systems; energy production, distribution, and storage; vital services, such as banking, water, and emergency services; and telecommunication systems. ! Law enforcement and investigative activities – programs aimed at reducing the ability of groups or individuals to commit terrorist acts, and investigating and prosecuting terrorist acts when they occur. ! Preparing for and responding to terrorist acts – activities focused on planning, training, and equipping personnel responsible for incident response. ! Research and development – programs designed to develop technologies to deter, prevent, or mitigate terrorist acts. Included in these figures is R&D to defend against weapons of mass destruction. Although the five mission categories and agency distribution data are useful in analyzing resource priorities for combating terrorism, Congress does not consider funding initiatives using these organizational structures. Rather, Congress addresses terrorism-related spending, like other funding proposals, through appropriation bills. In order to organize funding amounts in the way in which Congress considers and approves resources, tables in this report “cross-walk” the OMB figures from the mission and agency-based organization structure to an appropriation account listing. 2 Office of Management and Budget. Annual Report to Congress on Combating Terrorism. August 2001. Found at: [http://www.whitehouse.gov/omb/legislative/] CRS-3 There are significant limitations, however, in drawing on the OMB data and reconfiguring it to parallel the appropriation bill structure. The first is that very few Federal programs are exclusively focused on combating terrorism, making it difficult to precisely identify funding for terrorism activities.3 Rather, resources to combat terrorism are incorporated into larger, “host” programs in agency budgets. For example, a variety of counter-terrorism programs, totaling about $222 million in FY2001, are funded within the $417 million Justice Department’s Office of Justice Programs account. The $222 million figure represents a Department of Justice/OMB estimate and does not reflect a specific appropriation line item or a directive/earmark made by Congress in the FY2001 appropriation. Like executive agencies, Congress does not appropriate funds to combat terrorism in discreet accounts, except in a few cases. Rather, amounts for terrorism activities are merged into larger “host” accounts, and in most cases, there are no estimates of how much of the “host” account will or should be committed to combat terrorism. Committee reports on the appropriation measures occasionally discuss amounts dedicated to terrorism activities, but rarely in a comprehensive way that would allow for a clear identification of how much is included within a specific account and how the level might compare to the President’s request. Due to this limitation, most accounts listed in the House and Senate columns in the accompanying tables show a “not specified,” or “NS” designation and are not totaled. In order to mitigate this limitation to some extent, the tables also include amounts for the “host” accounts from which terrorism spending is drawn. Although not a definitive indicator of funding levels to combat terrorism, “host” account totals, when compared with Administration requests, can provide some evidence of whether appropriation bills provide sufficient amounts that would allow the executive agencies to proceed with plans to fund terrorism-related activities. Only in a few cases – where an account exclusively funds terrorism-related activities or is a congressional initiative, such as the creation of a new Deputy Attorney General for Domestic Terrorism in the Senatepassed Commerce, Justice, State spending bill – are amounts included in these House and Senate columns. Linking the OMB data that is organized according to the five “mission” categories with appropriation accounts also presents challenges. The mission categories, in many cases, appear to aggregate funds across several appropriation accounts, and in the case of the Department of Interior appropriation bill, across multiple agencies. Wherever possible, the tables provide more specific information regarding the purpose of funds for combating terrorism than what can be gleaned from OMB’s generic mission categories. Nevertheless, the categories used by OMB are the most frequently cited in the tables. Because OMB allocates funds from the $40 billion emergency supplemental by appropriation account, this problem does not apply to those resources. A further limitation is the lack of any breakdown for defense spending where the largest amount of terrorism-related funding is concentrated. The OMB report lumps 3 Some exceptions include the Justice Department’s Counter-terrorism Fund, the State Department’s Anti-Terrorism Assistance and Terrorist Interdiction Programs, the Treasury Department’s Counter-terrorism Fund. CRS-4 all U.S. defense, intelligence, and military construction into a single “National Security Community” group, making it impossible to differentiate between funds appropriated in the Defense and Military Construction spending bills. Moreover, the OMB document provides no further information regarding how the $6.4 billion “National Security Community” spending requested for FY2002 is allocated among appropriation accounts. Portions of the defense budget are classified, adding another obstacle to identifying accounts in which funds to combat terrorism are included. Due to these constraints, Table 4 includes a combined entry for Defense and Military Construction appropriations that does not offer any data at the account level. Resources allocated from the $40 billion emergency supplemental appropriation, however, are broken out into more specific categories provided by the Defense Department and OMB. A further possible deficiency in the OMB report is the extent to which amounts for combating terrorism are overstated. During research efforts to compile these data, CRS identified anecdotal evidence that selected figures in the OMB report far exceeded those attributed by other sources. For example, OMB states that the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Agriculture Research Service (ARS) spent $32.5 million on research related to bioterrorism in FY2001. A recent General Accounting Office report, however, quantifies the ARS total at $0.5 million last year.4 CRS is not able, however, to estimate the extent to which amounts provided in the OMB report are overstated, or conversely, understated. 4 U.S. General Accounting Office. Bioterrorism: Federal Research and Preparedness Activities, September 2001, p. 35. CRS-5 Table 1. Combating Terrorism Appropriations Summary ($s – millions) Enacted FY2001 Request FY2002 House FY2002 Senate FY2002 Enacted FY2002 Emerg Supp Allocation $57.9 $53.2 – – – $72.2 Commerce, Justice, State $2,205.7 $2,537.5 – – – $292.6 Defense & Military Construction $5,505.0 $6,433.0 – – – $5,460.4 $0.0 $0.0 $16.0 – – $6.0 Energy and Water Development $715.4 $801.7 – – – $5.0 Foreign Operations $55.5 $54.4 – – – $257.0 Interior $8.7 $7.7 – – – $3.1 $290.6 $343.3 – – – $155.2 NS NS – – – $86.6 Transportation $286.0 $290.5 – – – $332.2 Treasury, Postal Service, Executive Office of the President, & General Government $538.2 $525.2 – – – $147.5 Veterans Affairs, Housing & Urban Development, & Independent Agencies $36.9 $37.6 – – – $2,000.2 $9,642.0 $11,030.9 – – – $8,818.0 Appropriation Bill Agriculture & Related Agencies District of Columbia Labor, Health & Human Services, & Education Legislative Branch TOTAL NS = Not specified Emerg Supp Allocation = Amounts allocated by OMB from the $40 billion Emergency Supplemental Appropriation (P.L. 107-38). CRS-6 Table 2. Agriculture and Related Agencies ($s – millions) Enacted FY2001 Request FY2002 House FY2002 Senate FY2002 Enacted FY2002 Research $896.8 $32.5 $915.6 $34.6 $971.4 NS $1,004.7 NS – – Facility Work (Infrastructure) $74.0 $16.0 $30.5 $3.8 $78.9 NS $99.6 NS – – Emergency Management System $592.4 $0.0 $702.9 $0.2 $587.4 NS $602.8 NS – Facility Work (Infrastructure) $9.8 $3.2 $5.2 $3.2 $7.2 NS $5.2 NS – – Physical security of government Crisis Planning & Management $35.9 $5.7 $0.5 $37.1 $5.8 $0.6 $37.4 NS NS $37.1 NS NS – – – $1,066.2 $0.0 $1,173.7 $5.0 $1,183.6 NS $1,182.7 NS – – Appropriation Account Agriculture Research Service (ARS): Salaries & Expenses of which combating terrorism: Buildings & Facilities of which combating terrorism: Animal &Plant Health Inspection Service: Salaries & Expenses of which combating terrorism: Buildings & Facilities of which combating terrorism: Departmental Administration of which combating terrorism: Purpose Emerg Supp Allocation – Food and Drug Administration Salaries & Expenses of which combating terrorism: Research & Development Emergency Supplemental Allocations: Commodity Futures Trading Commission Office equipment for NYC/WTC office – – – – – $0.2 P.L. 480 food aid grants Purchase & deliver food to Afghans – – – – – $72.0 CRS-7 Appropriation Account TOTAL Agriculture and Related Agencies Purpose Enacted FY2001 Request FY2002 $57.9 $53.2 House FY2002 Senate FY2002 NS = Not specified Emerg Supp Allocation = Amounts allocated by OMB from the $40 billion Emergency Supplemental Appropriation (P.L. 107-38). Sources: OMB, Annual Report to Congress on Combating Terrorism, August 2001; USDA, Office of Budget and Program Analysis. Enacted FY2002 Emerg Supp Allocation – $72.2 CRS-8 Table 3. Commerce, Justice, and State, the Judiciary, and Related Agencies ($s – millions) Appropriation Account Purpose Emerg Supp Allocation Enacted FY2001 Request FY2002 House FY2002 Senate FY2002 Enacted FY2002 $57.5 $12.2 $61.6 $12.2 $61.6 NS $61.6 NS – – $597.0 $3.4 $4.1 $487.4 $3.4 $4.1 $489.0 NS NS $696.5 NS NS – – – – – – – – $0.1 $19.7 $19.7 – $0.1 $88.5 $9.0 $2.0 $93.4 $9.3 $2.0 $91.7 NS NS $93.4 NS NS – – – Commerce Department Bureau for Export Administration of which combating terrorism: Natl Institute of Standards & Technology of which combating terrorism: Export licensing enforcement/investigate Physical security of government Research & Development Emergency Supplemental Allocations: International Trade Administration Relocation of staff from WTC offices Subtotal Commerce Department Justice Department General Administration, S&E of which combating terrorism: Law enforcement/investigative activities Physical security of government General Administration, Dep AG for Terrorism Create a new Dep Att General for Combating Domestic Terrorism $0.0 $0.0 NS $23.0 – General Administration, Port Security Improved security for counterterrorism and counternarcotics $0.0 $0.0 NS $40.0 – $534.6 $9.7 $566.8 $10.8 $568.0 NS $527.5 NS – – General Legal Activities of which combating terrorism: Law enforcement & investigations CRS-9 Purpose Enacted FY2001 Request FY2002 House FY2002 Senate FY2002 Enacted FY2002 Physical security of government Preparing & responding to terrorist acts $1.6 $2.3 $2.3 $2.8 NS NS NS NS – – Physical security of government $160.7 $1.0 $178.5 $1.0 $178.8 NS $45.8 NS – – Antitrust Division of which combating terrorism: Physical security of government $120.6 $0.4 $141.0 $0.4 $141.4 NS $130.8 NS – – Community Relations Service of which combating terrorism: Preparing & responding to terrorist acts $8.5 $0.1 $9.3 $0.1 $9.3 NS $9.3 NS – – $5.0 $5.0 $5.0 $0.0 – $1,360.1 $12.2 $1,481.0 $15.8 $1,476.1 NS $1,489.8 NS – – $3,245.1 $3,507.1 $3,492.3 $3,469.1 – Law enforcement/investigative activities Physical security of government Preparing & responding to terrorist acts Research & Development $422.8 $8.8 $88.5 $6.9 $458.7 $10.8 $91.1 $6.9 NS NS NS NS NS NS NS NS – – – – Law enforcement/investigative activities $3,469.2 $19.0 $3,829.4 $19.0 $3,831.0 NS $3,786.2 NS – – $417.0 $407.7 $408.4 $564.7 – Appropriation Account Administrative Review and Appeals of which combating terrorism: Counterterrorism Fund Drug Enforcement Administration of which combating terrorism: Federal Bureau of Investigations S&E, Counter-Intelligence & Natl Security, and Construction of which combating terrorism: Federal Prisons Systems, S&E of which combating terrorism: Office of Justice Programs To reimburse DOJ offices damaged by terrorist acts & for costs to counter, investigate, or prosecute terrorist activities Physical security of government Emerg Supp Allocation CRS-10 Appropriation Account of which combating terrorism: Immigration and Naturalization Service of which combating terrorism: U.S. Attorneys of which combating terrorism: U.S. Marshals Service, S&E & Construction of which combating terrorism: Emerg Supp Allocation Enacted FY2001 Request FY2002 House FY2002 Senate FY2002 Enacted FY2002 $221.7 $220.5 $220.5 $364.0 – Law enforcement/investigative activities Physical security of government $3,252.0 $14.9 $13.3 $3,516.4 $22.6 $13.3 $3,499.9 NS NS $3,381.1 NS NS – – – Law enforcement/investigative activities Physical security of government $1,247.6 $2.0 $12.0 $1,346.3 $2.0 $12.0 $1,354.0 NS NS $1,260.4 NS NS – – – $589.5 $85.0 $626.4 $127.0 $629.3 NS $741.8 NS – – Increased airport & courthouse security – – – – – $3.6 Establish the Special Master’s office to coordinate WTC & Pentagon victims compensation. – – – – – $7.3 Investigation of terrorist attacks – – – – – $36.9 $938.2 $1,033.4 – $47.8 $1,077.6 $1,291.0 $1,286.0 $1,067.0 – $668.0 $826.0 $816.0 $661.6 – Purpose Prepares, equips, & trains State & local entities to respond to chemical, biological, radiological, & other incidents of domestic terrorism Physical security of government Emergency Supplemental Allocations: U.S. Marshals, S&E FBI, S&E Subtotal Justice Department State Department Embassy Security/ Construction/Maintenance of which combating terrorism: Worldwide embassy security upgrades CRS-11 Enacted FY2001 Request FY2002 House FY2002 Senate FY2002 Enacted FY2002 $3,167.2 $3,705.1 $3,645.7 $3,498.4 – Law enforcement and investigative Preparing & responding to terrorist acts $289.9 $15.0 $2.0 $301.1 $0.0 $2.0 NS NS NS NS NS NS – – – Law enforcement and investigative Preparing & responding to terrorist acts $41.3 $5.1 $0.3 $42.8 $5.1 $0.3 NS NS NS $42.8 NS NS – – – Law enforcement and investigative Physical security of government Research & Development $568.0 $4.0 $519.0 $3.0 $650.0 $4.0 $601.0 $3.0 NS NS NS NS NS NS NS NS – – – – Bureau of Financial Management & Policy of which combating terrorism: Law enforcement and investigative $56.2 $3.0 $67.6 $13.4 NS NS $62.6 NS – – Bureau of Intelligence of which combating terrorism: Law enforcement and investigative $39.2 $1.0 $40.3 $1.0 NS NS $39.2 NS – – Law enforcement and investigative Preparing & responding to terrorist acts $21.6 $11.6 $1.0 $22.6 $11.6 $1.0 NS NS NS $22.5 NS NS – – – Office of the Secretary of which combating terrorism: Preparing & responding to terrorist acts $58.3 $3.2 $60.8 $3.2 NS NS NS NS – – Office of the Secretary/Counter-Terrorism Research & Development $1.8 $3.0 NS $1.8 – Appropriation Account Purpose Diplomatic and Consular Programs Bureau of Administration of which combating terrorism: Bureau of Consular Affairs of which combating terrorism: Bureau of Diplomatic Security of which combating terrorism: Bureau of Political/Military Affairs of which combating terrorism: Emergency Supplemental Allocations: Emerg Supp Allocation CRS-12 Purpose Enacted FY2001 Request FY2002 House FY2002 Senate FY2002 Enacted FY2002 Emerg Supp Allocation Potential evacuation at high-threat posts – – – – – $0.4 Hiring new Diplomatic Security agents – – – – – $30.0 Media outreach to Muslim audiences – – – – – $15.0 Emergency medical supplies – – – – – $4.0 Counterterrorism Foreign Emergency Support Team equipment – – – – – $1.0 Intl component in next Top Officials training in biological terrorism simulation – – – – – $3.0 Counterterrorism Coordinator staff – – – – – $2.0 Capital Investment Fund Improved communications – – – – – $15.0 Emergencies in Diplomatic/Consular Service Rewards for terrorist information & potential evacuation at high-threat posts – – – – – $41.0 International Broadcasting Operations Increase VOA & RFE/RL broadcasts – – – – – $12.3 $1,238.0 $1,474.6 $9.8 $9.8 Appropriation Account Diplomatic and Consular Programs Subtotal State Department $123.7 Other Agencies Judiciary (multiple accounts) of which combating terrorism: Emergency Supplemental Allocations: Judiciary Physical security of government NS NS – – CRS-13 Appropriation Account Purpose Enacted FY2001 Request FY2002 House FY2002 Senate FY2002 Enacted FY2002 Emerg Supp Allocation Supreme Court, Care of Buildings & Grounds Protective window film – – – – – $1.3 Court of Appeals, District Courts, & Other Court security – – – – – $19.7 Low interest disaster loans for victims in affected areas – – – – – $100.0 $2,205.7 $2,537.5 Small Business Administration Disaster Loans Program TOTAL, Commerce/Justice/State NS = Not specified Emerg Supp Allocation = Amounts allocated by OMB from the $40 billion Emergency Supplemental Appropriation (P.L. 107-38). Sources: OMB, Annual Report to Congress on Combating Terrorism, August 2001 House and Senate Appropriations Committees $292.6 CRS-14 Table 4. Defense and Military Construction ($s – millions) Emerg Supp Allocation Purpose Enacted FY2001 Request FY2002 House FY2002 Senate FY2002 Enacted FY2002 Law enforcement/investigative activities Physical security of government Preparing & responding to terrorist acts Research & Development $2,731.5 $2,300.3 $238.3 $234.9 $2,887.7 $3,097.5 $248.5 $199.3 – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – $1,762.4 Enhanced force protection – – – – – $760.0 Improved command and control – – – – – $668.0 Increased worldwide posture (higher optempo & mobilizing reserves) – – – – – $910.0 Offensive counterterrorism (increased inventory of precision munitions) – – – – – $392.0 Initial crisis response (including Navy deployments & combat air patrol, & family asst & identifying remains) – – – – – $522.0 Pentagon repair & construction – – – – – $141.0 Natl Guard providing airport security – – – – – $205.0 Other (including fuel costs) – – – – – $100.0 Programs Defense and Military Construction of which combating terrorism: Emergency Supplemental Allocations: Increased situational awareness Enhanced intelligence & other capabilities CRS-15 Programs TOTAL Defense and Military Construction Purpose Enacted FY2001 Request FY2002 $5,505.0 $6,433.0 House FY2002 NS = Not specified Emerg Supp Allocation = Amounts allocated by OMB from the $40 billion Emergency Supplemental Appropriation (P.L. 107-38). Source: OMB and OMB Annual Report to Congress on Combating Terrorism, August 2001. Senate FY2002 Enacted FY2002 Emerg Supp Allocation $5,460.4 CRS-16 Table 5. District of Columbia ($s – millions) Appropriation Account Emergency Planning Purpose Terrorism response Emerg Supp Allocation Enacted FY2001 Request FY2002 House FY2002 Senate FY2002 Enacted FY2002 $0.0 $0.0 $16.0 – – – – – – – $6.0 $0.0 $0.0 $16.0 – – $6.0 Emergency Supplemental Allocations: Federal support for Econ Development & Management Reform in the District TOTAL District of Columbia Short-term response activities, including police, fire, & public works overtime costs NS = Not specified Emerg Supp Allocation = Amounts allocated by OMB from the $40 billion Emergency Supplemental Appropriation (P.L. 107-38). Note: Emergency Planning funds provided in the House-passed bill were originally requested to cover security costs associated with the World Bank/IMF meeting. Sources: OMB House Appropriations Committee CRS-17 Table 6. Energy and Water Development ($s – millions) Appropriation Account Purpose Enacted FY2001 Request FY2002 House FY2002 Senate FY2002 Enacted FY2002 $4.0 $4.0 $4.0 $4.0 – NS NS NS NS – $0.03 $0.03 $0.03 $0.03 – $0.3 NS $0.3 NS $0.3 NS $0.3 NS – $1.0 $1.8 $1.8 $1.8 – $678.5 NS $648.0 $3.0 $691.2 NS $732.5 NS – – $13,468.1 $593.9 $0.9 $47.1 $68.0 $13,355.1 $690.8 $1.0 $45.1 $55.6 $13,875.4 NS NS NS NS $15,088.5 NS NS NS NS – – – – – $481.9 $506.9 $516.9 $511.9 – Defense Dept – Army Corps of Engineers National Emergency Preparedness Program of which combating terrorism: Preparing for national/regional crises, including terrorist acts National Dam Security Program Antiterrorism planning & training Interior Dept – Bureau of Reclamation Emergency Planning & Disaster Response of which combating terrorism: Site Security Program Water & Related Resources of which combating terrorism: Disaster response, emergency notification, & continuity of operations Physical security of dams against sabotage and terrorism Individual project security improvements Energy Department Defense Activities of which combating terrorism: Nuclear Regulatory Commission Physical security of government Law enforcement Preparing & responding to terrorist acts Research & Development Emerg Supp Allocation CRS-18 Appropriation Account of which combating terrorism: Purpose Enacted FY2001 Request FY2002 House FY2002 Senate FY2002 Enacted FY2002 Physical security of govt & populace Law enforcement Preparing & responding to terrorist acts $3.7 $0.5 $0.3 $3.6 $0.6 $0.2 NS NS NS NS NS NS – – – Enhance security at DOE national labs – – – -- – $715.4 $801.7 Emerg Supp Allocation Emergency Supplemental Allocations: Energy Department Natl Nuclear Security Administration, Weapons Activities TOTAL Energy and Water Development NS = Not specified Emerg Supp Allocation = Amounts allocated by OMB from the $40 billion Emergency Supplemental Appropriation (P.L. 107-38). Sources: OMB, Annual Report to Congress on Combating Terrorism, August 2001 Army Corps of Engineers $5.0 $5.0 CRS-19 Table 7. Foreign Operations ($s – millions) Appropriation Account USAID operating expenses of which combating terrorism: USAID disaster aid of which combating terrorism: Non-Proliferation, anti-terrorism, demining (State Department) of which combating terrorism: Enacted FY2001 Request FY2002 House FY2002 Senate FY2002 Enacted FY2002 Security at U.S. & overseas facilities $531.8 $12.5 $549.0 $11.6 $549.0 NS $549.0 NS – – Preparing for WMD disasters $164.3 $1.0 $200.0 $0.8 $201.0 NS $255.0 NS – – Purpose Emerg Supp Allocation – Anti-Terrorism Assistance Terrorist Interdiction Program $38.0 $4.0 $38.0 $4.0 $38.0 $4.0 $38.0 $4.0 – – Emergency Supplemental Allocations: Export-Import Bank Relocate NYC office – – – – – $0.1 USAID Operating Expenses Evacuation plans & communications – – – – – $2.4 Security enhancements overseas – – – – – $2.0 USAID Disaster Assistance Humanitarian aid in Afghanistan – – – – – $20.0 Economic Support Fund Economic support for Pakistan – – – – – $100.0 Intl Narcotics Control & Law Enforcement Improved Pakistani border security – – – – – $73.0 Peace Corps Evacuation of volunteers – – – – – $6.5 Intl Affairs Technical Assistance Foreign government training to combat terrorist financing – – – – – $3.0 CRS-20 Appropriation Account Migration & Refugee Assistance Purpose Aid to potential new refugees in Pakistan & neighboring countries TOTAL Foreign Operations Enacted FY2001 Request FY2002 House FY2002 Senate FY2002 Enacted FY2002 Emerg Supp Allocation – – – – – $50.0 $55.5 $54.4 NS = Not specified Emerg Supp Allocation = Amounts allocated by OMB from the $40 billion Emergency Supplemental Appropriation (P.L. 107-38). Sources: OMB, Annual Report to Congress on Combating Terrorism, August 200. USAID Office of Physical Security $257.0 CRS-21 Table 8. Interior and Related Agencies ($s – millions) Enacted FY2001 Request FY2002 House FY2002 Senate FY2002 Enacted FY2002 National Park Service $2,133.5 $2,517.7 $2,284.7 $2,295.1 – Bureau of Land Management $2,144.2 $1,771.5 $1,872.4 $1,859.1 – Bureau of Indian Affairs $2,137.6 $2,203.6 $2,213.8 $2,230.4 – $64.2 $0.5 $64.2 $0.5 $55.2 NS $67.5 NS – – $2,133.5 $0.9 $2,517.7 $1.6 $2,284.7 NS $2,295.1 NS – – National Park Service $2,133.5 $2,517.7 $2,284.7 $2,295.1 – Fish & Wildlife Service $1,209.0 $1,091.0 $1,336.0 $1,271.0 – $882.8 $1.1 $813.4 $1.1 $900.5 NS $892.5 NS – – National Park Service $2,133.5 $2,517.7 $2,284.7 $2,295.1 – Bureau of Indian Affairs of which combating terrorism (combined): $2,137.6 $6.2 $2,203.6 $4.5 $2,213.8 NS $2,230.4 NS – – Appropriation Account Purpose Office of the Secretary of which combating terrorism (combined): Preparing & responding to terrorist acts National Park Service of which combating terrorism: Physical security of national populace U.S. Geological Survey of which combating terrorism (combined): Physical security of government Law enforcement/investigative procedures Emerg Supp Allocation Emergency Supplemental Allocations: Operation of the National Park System Emergency response costs, NYC & DC – – – – – $1.7 U.S. Park Police Emergency response costs in NYC & DC – – – – – $1.4 CRS-22 Appropriation Account TOTAL Interior Purpose Enacted FY2001 Request FY2002 $8.7 $7.7 House FY2002 Senate FY2002 Enacted FY2002 Emerg Supp Allocation $3.1 NS = Not specified Emerg Supp Allocation = Amounts allocated by OMB from the $40 billion Emergency Supplemental Appropriation (P.L. 107-38). Source: OMB, Annual Report to Congress on Combating Terrorism, August 2001 Note: Although it is not clear what portion of the U.S. Park Police budget can be attributed specifically to combating terrorism, security to prevent and respond to terrorist acts at memorials and buildings managed by the National Park Service – including the Statue of Liberty, the White House, Lincoln Memorial, Jefferson Memorial, Washington Monument and areas around the U.S. Capitol – is a core function of the U.S. Park Police. Moreover, the Park Police received $1.6 million in FY2001 for stepped up security at the Washington Monument in the face of terrorist threats. Because the OMB Terrorism report combines spending figures for several agencies, it is unclear whether or how much of Park Police money is identified as countering terrorism. The Park Police received a total of $59.2 million for operations in FY2001(excluding the Pension Fund). For FY2002, the budget request is $65.3 million, the House-passed bill contains $65.3 million, and the Senate-passed bill contains $66.1 million. CRS-23 Table 9. Labor, Health and Human Services, and Education ($s – millions) Emerg Supp Allocation Enacted FY2001 Request FY2002 House FY2002 Senate FY2002 Enacted FY2002 $4,046.6 $180.9 $3,878.5 $181.9 – – – – – – $20,298.3 23.041.9 – – – $49.7 $92.7 – – – $356.5 $421.2 – – – Countering bioterrorism, including R&D, metropolitan medical response, & cybersecurity $60.0 $68.7 – – – Health related needs-NYC/DC metro area – – – – – $126.2 Training & Employment Services Temporary jobs to aid NYC restoration – – – – – $25.0 State Unemployment Insurance & Employment Service Operations Unemployment insurance – – – – – $3.5 Occupational Safety &Heath Admin. OSHA monitoring at disaster sites – – – – – $0.5 $290.6 $343.3 Appropriation Account Purpose U.S. Dept. of Health & Human Services Centers for Disease Control & Prevention of which combating terrorism: Bioterrorism preparedness and response, including Natl Pharmaceutical Stockpile National Institutes of Health of which combating terrorism: Basic & applied research related to likely bioterrorism agents General Departmental Management of which combating terrorism: Emergency Supplemental Allocations: U.S. Dept. of Health & Human Services Public Health & Social Service Emergency Fund U.S. Dept. of Labor TOTAL Labor, Health & Human Services, and Education $155.2 NS = Not specified Emerg Supp Allocation = Amounts allocated by OMB from the $40 billion Emergency Supplemental Appropriation (P.L. 107-38). Sources: OMB, Annual Report to Congress on Combating Terrorism, August 2001; House Appropriations Committee; DHHS FY2002 budget justifications; NIH Budget Office CRS-24 Table 10. Legislative Branch ($s – millions) Appropriation Account U.S. Capitol Police Board of which combating terrorism: Purpose Law enforcement/investigative/physical security Enacted FY2001 Request FY2002 House FY2002 Senate FY2002 Enacted FY2002 $106.9 NS $122.3 NS $123.7 NS $125.3 NS – – Emerg Supp Allocation Emergency Supplemental Allocations: U.S. Capitol Police Increased security & overtime pay – – – – – $42.8 Senate Increased security; preparing for future – – – – – $5.3 House of Representatives Increased security; preparing for future – – – – – $1.3 Office of Attending Physician Reduce risk & potential damage of life caused by future terrorist events – – – – – $1.5 Architect of the Capitol Increased security; preparing for future – – – – – $33.2 Library of Congress Increased security; preparing for future – – – – – $2.5 NS NS NS NS TOTAL Legislative Branch NS = Not specified Emerg Supp Allocation = Amounts allocated by OMB from the $40 billion Emergency Supplemental Appropriation (P.L. 107-38). Source: OMB $86.6 CRS-25 Table 11. Transportation and Related Agencies ($s – millions) Emerg Supp Allocation Enacted FY2001 Request FY2002 House FY2002 Senate FY2002 Enacted FY2002 $1.3 NS $1.3 NS $1.3 NS $1.3 NS – – Law enforcement and investigative Physical security of government Preparing & responding to terrorist acts $4,510.7 $0.6 $0.1 $2.6 $5,055.8 $0.5 $0.1 $2.7 $4,996.2 NS NS NS $5,110.6 NS NS NS – – – – Civil Aviation Security Explosives Detection Systems System Security Technology $12,588.0 $125.5 $101.8 $54.4 $13,287.8 $134.9 $100.0 $50.3 $13,275.5 NS $100.0 $44.5 $13,325.8 $134.9 $100.0 $55.3 – – – – Preparing & responding to terrorist acts Research & Development $6,260.7 $0.8 $0.1 $6,747.0 $1.1 $0.8 $6,747.0 NS NS $6,847.0 NS NS – – – Physical security of national populace $13.0 $0.1 $13.3 $0.1 $13.4 NS $13.3 NS – – Coast Guard operating expenses NY Harbor patrols & reservists recall – – – – – $18.0 Federal Aviation Administration Ops Increased airport security/Sky Marshals – – – – – $264.0 FAA Aviation Insurance Revolving Fund War risk insurance for air carriers – – – – – $50.0 Natl Transportation Safety Board, S&E Recovery of flight recorders & aid to victims’ families – – – – – $0.2 $286.0 $290.5 Appropriation Account Office of the Sec./Security & Intelligence of which combating terrorism: Coast Guard, Defense Function of which combating terrorism: Federal Aviation Administration of which combating terrorism: Federal Transit Administration of which combating terrorism: St. Lawrence Seaway Development Corp. of which combating terrorism: Purpose Intelligence gathering Emergency Supplemental Allocations: TOTAL Transportation NS = Not specified $332.2 CRS-26 Emerg Supp Allocation = Amounts allocated by OMB from the $40 billion Emergency Supplemental Appropriation (P.L. 107-38). Sources: OMB, Annual Report to Congress on Combating Terrorism, August 2001; Federal Aviation Administration CRS-27 Table 12. Treasury, Postal Service, Executive Office of the President, and General Government ($s – millions) Appropriation Account Enacted FY2001 Request FY2002 House FY2002 Senate FY2002 Enacted FY2002 $54.9 $44.9 $36.9 $44.9 – Law enforcement & investigative Physical security of government Physical security of national populace Research & Development $771.1 $22.3 $5.6 $2.8 $0.8 $803.5 $22.4 $5.7 $2.8 $0.8 $806.8 NS NS NS NS $821.4 NS NS NS NS – – – – – National Terrorist Asset Tracking Center $222.3 $0.0 $181.8 $0.0 $174.2 $2.6 $187.3 NS – – $3.0 $2.0 $1.0 $3.0 $2.0 $1.0 NS NS NS NS NS NS – – – Law enforcement & investigative Physical security of government $153.4 $0.7 $2.6 $122.6 $0.8 $2.7 $129.7 NS NS $139.8 NS NS – – – Physical security of government Physical security of national populace Preparing & responding to terrorist acts $256.0 $1.0 $2.0 $0.1 $211.6 $0.8 $1.6 $0.1 $213.2 NS NS NS $212.3 NS NS NS – – – – $8,888.9 $16.8 $9,422.4 $17.7 $9,457.4 NS $9,450.4 NS – – Purpose Department of the Treasury Counterterrorism Fund Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, & Firearms of which combating terrorism: Departmental Offices of which combating terrorism: To reimburse Dept of Treasury offices for costs to counter, investigate, or prosecute domestic or international terrorist activities & for damage caused by terrorist acts. Bureau of Engraving & Printing (funded through revenues) of which combating terrorism: Physical security of government Physical security of national populace Preparing & responding to terrorist acts Federal Law Enforcement Training Center of which combating terrorism: Financial Management Service of which combating terrorism: Internal Revenue Service (multiple accounts combined) of which combating terrorism: Law enforcement & investigative Emerg Supp Allocation CRS-28 Enacted FY2001 Request FY2002 House FY2002 Senate FY2002 Enacted FY2002 $1.8 $3.5 NS NS – $118.2 $5.6 $0.1 $122.3 $5.8 $0.1 $123.5 NS NS $123.8 NS NS – – – $2,279.3 $59.1 $12.7 $9.7 $2,385.2 $48.7 $13.0 $10.0 $2,669.3 NS NS NS $2,555.9 NS NS NS – – – – $833.8 $24.3 $157.4 $37.0 $8.5 $0.5 $860.5 $24.3 $151.0 $48.4 $8.0 $0.5 $923.6 NS NS NS NS NS $903.0 NS NS NS NS NS – – – – – – Federal Buildings Fund (mainly supported through revenues, plus some appropriations) $476.5 $276.4 $276.4 $276.4 – of which combating terrorism: Public Buildings Serv, Fed Protective Serv/Law enforcement & investigative $15.8 $14.0 NS NS – Public Buildings Serv, Fed Protective Serv/Physical security of government $87.9 $89.8 NS NS – Public Buildings Serv, Fed Protective Serv/Preparing & responding to terrorist acts $2.2 $1.8 NS NS – Appropriation Account Purpose Physical security of government Inspector General for Tax Administration of which combating terrorism: Law enforcement & investigative Preparing & responding to terrorist acts U.S. Customs Service (multiple accounts combined) of which combating terrorism: Law enforcement & investigative Physical security of government Physical security of national populace U.S. Secret Service (multiple accounts combined) of which combating terrorism: Law enforcement & investigative Physical security of government Physical security of national populace Preparing & responding to terrorist acts Research & Development Emerg Supp Allocation General Services Administration Emergency Supplemental Allocations: Department of the Treasury Departmental Offices, S&E Needs of staff located in/near WTC – – – – – $6.1 Dept Offices, Financial Crimes Enforcement Foreign Terrorist Assets Tracking Center – – – – – $0.06 CRS-29 Purpose Enacted FY2001 Request FY2002 House FY2002 Senate FY2002 Enacted FY2002 Emerg Supp Allocation Financial Management Service Foreign Terrorist Assets Tracking Center – – – – – $0.1 Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, & Firearms Needs of staff located in/near WTC – – – – – $1.5 U.S. Customs Service, S&E Needs of staff located in/near WTC & air support for counterterrorism – – – – – $21.0 U.S. Customs Service, O&M/Procurement Air support for counterterrorism – – – – – $14.7 IRS, Processing, Asst, & Management Securing NYC facilities, overtime & other admin costs – – – – – $1.9 IRS, Tax Law Enforcement Security/investigative expenses, replacement of destroyed equipment – – – – – $2.2 IRS, Information Systems Replace destroyed data infrastructure, install new network systems – – – – – $0.5 Relocate staff; protective window film – – – – – $7.2 Establish office of Homeland Security – – – – – $25.5 National Security Council (NSC) S&E Establish NSC Directorate to Combat Terrorism – – – – – $4.8 Unanticipated needs Other urgent security-related activities – – – – – $51.0 Equipment replacement for NY HIDTA – – – – – $2.3 Increased security coverage & other costs – – – – – $8.6 $656.4 $647.5 Appropriation Account Executive Office of President Office of Administration, S&E Federal Drug Control Programs High Intensity Drug Trafficking Areas General Services Administration Real Property Activities; Fed. Buildings Fund TOTAL Treasury, Postal Service, Executive Office of the President, & General Govt NS = Not specified Emerg Supp Allocation = Amounts allocated by OMB from the $40 billion Emergency Supplemental Appropriation (P.L. 107-38). Source: OMB, Annual Report to Congress on Combating Terrorism, August 2001 $147.5 CRS-30 Table 13. Veterans Affairs, Housing and Urban Development, and Independent Agencies ($s – millions) Appropriation Account Enacted FY2001 Request FY2002 House FY2002 Senate FY2002 Enacted FY2002 $12.9 $3.2 $13.0 $3.2 NS NS NS NS – – $269.6 $354.6 $404.6 $429.6 – $17.2 $17.4 NS NS – $1.2 $1.2 NS NS – Preparing & responding to terrorist acts $592.4 $0.0 $702.9 $0.1 $587.4 NS $602.8 NS – – Physical security of government Preparing & responding to terrorist acts NS $1.6 $13.7 NS $1.6 $14.1 NS NS NS NS NS NS – – – Purpose Emerg Supp Allocation Environmental Protection Agency Office of Solid Waste & Emergency Response (funded from multiple accounts) of which combating terrorism: Preparing & responding to terrorist acts Federal Emergency Management Agency Emergency Management & Planning Asst (EMPA) of which combating terrorism: Salaries & Expenses of which combating terrorism: Multiple accounts (combined) of which combating terrorism: Risk assessment, training, equipment, & facility purchase Preparedness, Training, & Exercises (EMPA sub-account) Emergency Supplemental Allocations: Federal Emergency Management Agency Disaster Relief Emergency aid to NYC & other affected jurisdictions – – – – – $2,000.0 Dept of Veterans Affairs/Natl Cemetery Ad. Internment costs of veterans killed in terrorist attacks – – – – – $0.2 $36.9 $37.6 TOTAL VA, HUD, & Independent Agencies NS = Not specified Emerg Supp Allocation = Amounts allocated by OMB from the $40 billion Emergency Supplemental Appropriation (P.L. 107-38). Sources: OMB, Annual Report to Congress on Combating Terrorism, August 2001; FEMA. $2,000.2 EveryCRSReport.com The Congressional Research Service (CRS) is a federal legislative branch agency, housed inside the Library of Congress, charged with providing the United States Congress non-partisan advice on issues that may come before Congress. EveryCRSReport.com republishes CRS reports that are available to all Congressional staff. The reports are not classified, and Members of Congress routinely make individual reports available to the public. Prior to our republication, we redacted names, phone numbers and email addresses of analysts who produced the reports. We also added this page to the report. 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