Appropriations for FY2002: An Overview

Appropriations are one part of a complex federal budget process that includes budget resolutions, appropriations (regular, supplemental, and continuing) bills, rescissions, and budget reconciliation bills. This report is a guide to one of the 13 regular appropriations bills that Congress passes each year.

Order Code RL31000 CRS Report for Congress Received through the CRS Web Appropriations for FY2002: An Overview Updated March 12, 2002 Mary Frances Bley Information Research Specialist Information Research Division Congressional Research Service ˜ The Library of Congress Appropriations are one part of a complex federal budget process that includes budget resolutions, appropriations (regular, supplemental, and continuing) bills, rescissions, and budget reconciliation bills. The process begins with the President’s budget request and is bound by the rules of the House and Senate, the Congressional Budget and Impoundment Control Act of 1974 (as amended), the Budget Enforcement Act of 1990, and current program authorizations. This report is a guide to the CRS Appropriation Report Series, 13 reports that summarize the legislative status of the appropriation bills, major issues, funding levels, and provide listings of key CRS staff relevant to the issues covered. This report will not be updated. NOTE: A Web version of this document with active links is available to congressional staff at: [http://www.crs.gov/products/appropriations/apppage.shtml]. Appropriations for FY2002: An Overview Summary This report provides an overview of the Congressional Research Service FY2002 Appropriations Report Series, and summarizes selected action on regular bills, supplemental measures, and continuing resolutions. This report will not be updated. Appropriations Vote Status Page: Access to legislation, votes, and CRS analysis. Internet: [http://www.crs.gov/products/appropriations/appover.shtml] Printer-Ready: [http://www.crs.gov/products/appropriations/apprint.pdf] FY2002 Appropriations Report Series CRS Report RL31001, Agriculture and Related Agencies CRS Report RL31009, Commerce, Justice, State, Judiciary, and Related Agencies CRS Report RL31005, Defense: Appropriations and Authorization CRS Report RL31013, District of Columbia CRS Report RL31007, Energy and Water Development CRS Report RL31011, Foreign Operations and Export Financing CRS Report RL31006, Interior and Related Agencies CRS Report RL31003, Labor, Health and Human Services, and Education CRS Report RL31012, Legislative Branch CRS Report RL31010, Military Construction CRS Report RL31008, Transportation and Related Agencies CRS Report RL31002, Treasury, Postal Service, Executive Office of the President CRS Report RL31004, Veterans Affairs, Housing and Urban Development Contents Most Recent Developments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Terrorism Supplemental: CRS Products . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Terrorism Supplemental OMB Requests . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . FY2001 Budget Surplus: $127.2 billion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 1 1 1 Appropriations Status Table (Bills, Votes, Analysis) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Appropriations Product Series . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Appropriations Coordinators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Agriculture, Rural Development, FDA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Commerce, Justice, State, Judiciary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Defense . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 District of Columbia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Energy and Water Development . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Foreign Operations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Interior . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Labor/HHS/Education . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Legislative Branch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Military Construction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Transportation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Treasury/Postal Service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 Veterans Affairs/Housing and Urban Development . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 For Additional Reading . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Appropriations and Budget Process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Budget FY2002 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Continuing Resolutions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Debt and Economy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Social Security Surplus (Off-Budget) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 15 15 15 15 16 Internet Access . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Appropriation Bills, Reports, Laws, Vetoes (FY1997-FY2002) . . . . . . . . Appropriation Committees Sites, Publications, Membership . . . . . . . . . . . Budget Process Institutes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Budget Timetable . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . CBO Current Status of Discretionary Appropriations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . CBO Budget Reports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . CBO Unauthorized Appropriations/Expiring Authorizations . . . . . . . . . . Debt . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Floor Agenda . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Glossaries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Locating Agencies/Programs in Appropriation Bills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . OMB Supplemental Requests . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . OMB Veto Indications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Rules Committee—House (Special Rules) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 302(b) Spending Allocations Appropriation Subcommittees . . . . . . . . . . . 16 16 16 16 16 16 16 16 16 17 17 17 17 17 17 17 Budget/Appropriations Sequence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 Budget Resolution Votes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 List of Tables Table 1. Administration Requests/Amounts Enacted . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 Table 2. Discretionary/Mandatory Outlays . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 Appropriations for FY2002: An Overview Most Recent Developments For the most recent appropriations bill status and developments, see the FY2002 Appropriations Table [http://www.crs.gov/products/appropriations/appover.shtml]. Terrorism Supplemental: CRS Products ! CRS Report RL31187, Terrorism Spending: Congressional Debate on Emergency Supplemental Allocations by Amy Belasco and Larry Nowels. ! CRS Report RL31173, Terrorism Funding: Emergency Supplemental Appropriations Distribution of Funds to Departments and Agencies, by James R. Riehl. ! “Budget and Appropriations” section of the CRS Terrorism Briefing Book, [http://www.congress.gov/brbk/html/ebter1.shtml]. Terrorism Supplemental OMB Requests The Office of Management and Budget (OMB) Estimates 13-23 concern emergency terrorism supplementals. Estimate 9 is the defense supplemental request of June 27, 2001. (Note: Estimates 1 and 2 are from the Clinton Administration.) [http://w3.access.gpo.gov/usbudget/fy2002/amndsup.html] FY2001 Budget Surplus: $127.2 billion On October 29, 2001, OMB and the Treasury Department released the budget results for FY2001, showing the unified surplus at $127.2 billion, or 1.3% of the Gross Domestic Product (GDP). The on-budget (non-Social Security) deficit was $33.5 billion, and the off-budget (Social Security) surplus was $160.7 billion. In nominal terms, the surplus is the second largest in U.S. history. Press Release: [http://www.ustreas.gov/press/releases/po734.htm] For information on the FY2002 budget, see CRS Issue Brief IB10079, The Budget for Fiscal Year 2002. Appropriations Status Table (Bills, Votes, Analysis) For the most current appropriation votes: Internet-Linked: [http://www.crs.gov/products/appropriations/appover.shtml] CRS-2 Printer-Ready: [http://www.crs.gov/products/appropriations/apprint.pdf] Constituents (THOMAS): [http://thomas.loc.gov/home/approp/appover.html] Appropriations Product Series The CRS Appropriations/Budget Products Page provides direct access to a CRS product series providing analysis for each of the 13 appropriations bills. Also included is an Appropriations Status Chart providing access to appropriations votes (including continuing resolutions), bills, reports, and public laws. Other access points include information on supplemental proposals, a budget chronology and overview with active Internet links, a list of key CRS policy staff, and a guide to locating federal agencies, departments, and programs in appropriations bills: [http://www.crs.gov/products/appropriations/apppage.shtml]. Appropriations Coordinators Area of Expertise Agriculture Commerce, Justice, State, Judiciary Defense District of Columbia Energy/Water Foreign Operations Interior Labor, HHS, Education Legislative Branch Military Construction Transportation Treasury, Postal Service Veterans, Housing and Urban Development Name Ralph Chite Susan Epstein Amy Belasco Tel. 7-7296 7-6678 Steve Daggett 7-7627 7-7642 Eugene P. Boyd Michael Fauntroy Carl Behrens Marc Humphries Larry Nowels Carol Hardy Vincent Susan Boren Paul M. Irwin Paul E. Dwyer Daniel H. Else Robert Kirk Randy Peterman Sharon Gressle Dennis W. Snook Richard Bourdon 7-8689 7-0635 7-8303 7-7264 7-7645 7-8651 7-6899 7-7573 7-8668 7-4996 7-7769 7-3267 7-8677 7-7314 7-7806 Agriculture, Rural Development, FDA P.L. 107-76 – Vote Status Table: Internet-Linked: [http://www.crs.gov/products/appropriations/appover.shtml] Printer-Ready: [http://www.crs.gov/products/appropriations/apprint.pdf] CRS Report RL31001, Appropriations for FY2002: U.S. Department of Agriculture and Related Agencies, coordinated by Ralph M. Chite: CRS-3 December 3, 2001 (Summary) On November 28, 2001, the President signed into law the FY2002 Agriculture Appropriations Act (P.L. 107-76, H.R. 2330), which provides $75.902 billion in budget authority for the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) and related agencies. The amount provided in the Act is $118 million below the Senate-passed level, $1.3 billion above the House-passed level, $1.6 billion above the Administration request, and $2.5 billion above the enacted FY2001 level (excluding FY2001 supplementals). The House- and Senate-passed versions of H.R. 2330 differed by about $1.5 billion going into conference. The largest dollar difference between the two bills was that the Senate bill provided a food stamp contingency reserve of $2 billion, while the House bill contained $1 billion, as recommended by the Administration. Conferees concurred with the Senate level of $2 billion for the reserve. Among other major differences resolved by conferees – conferees dropped a provision only in the House bill that would have allowed consumers to import Federal Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved drugs into the United States. Conferees also provided $75 million in market loss assistance for apple growers, compared with $150 million in the House-passed bill and no funding in the Senate bill. The Senate-passed bill contained significantly more funding for USDA rural development programs, particularly for the Rural Community Advancement Program (RCAP), with $1.0 billion in the Senate bill compared with $767.5 million in the House bill. Conferees provided $806 million for RCAP and $2.581 billion for all rural development programs, levels much closer to the House bill than the Senate. Conferees also extended the dairy price support program through May 31, 2002, a provision found in neither bill. As in previous years’ appropriations measures, P.L. 107-76 limits funding for several USDA mandatory programs and applies the savings toward discretionary spending. This includes a prohibition of all FY2002 funding for the Fund for Rural America, the research-oriented Initiative for Future Agriculture and Food Systems, and the Conservation Farm Option. P.L. 107-76 also assumes no new funding for several mandatory conservation programs that have exhausted their authorized funding. Report language in both the House and the Senate encourages USDA to continue funding the Global Food for Education Initiative, which was funded at $300 million in FY2001. Separate from the appropriations process, but related to federal farm spending, a supplemental authorization act (P.L. 107-25) enacted on August 13, 2001, provided $5.5 billion to help farmers recover from low commodity prices. The supplemental (P.L. 107-38) enacted in response to the terrorist attacks has provided $72 million to date for P.L. 480 food assistance for Afghans, with a portion of the funding in the Act unallocated. Commerce, Justice, State, Judiciary P.L. 107-77 – Vote Status Table: Internet-Linked: [http://www.crs.gov/products/appropriations/appover.shtml] Printer-Ready: [http://www.crs.gov/products/appropriations/apprint.pdf] CRS-4 CRS Report RL31009, Appropriations for FY2002: Commerce, Justice, and State, the Judiciary, and Related Agencies, coordinated by Susan B. Epstein: February 13, 2002 (Summary) This report tracks action by the 107th Congress on FY2002 appropriations for the Departments of Commerce, Justice, and State, the Judiciary, and other related agencies (often referred to as CJS appropriations). President Bush’s FY2002 budget request totaled $40.81 billion, about $1 billion (2.6%) above the FY2001 total. The House agreed to $41.46 billion, the committee total, and passed the bill (H.R. 2500) on July 18. The Senate Appropriations Committee recommended a total of $41.53 billion (S. 1215). The Senate passed its version of H.R. 2500, as amended, on September 13, 2001. Conferees met on November 8 and agreed to a total funding level of $39.3 billion. The bill was signed into law (P.L. 107-77) on November 2, 2001. Department of Justice. The FY2002 request was $21.11 billion, less than 1% above the FY2001 enacted level. Key issues included: addressing terrorism; reducing gun crimes through enforcement of existing laws; combating drug abuse; funding for community policing programs under the Office of Justice Programs; restructuring the Immigration and Naturalization Service; reducing pending immigration and naturalization caseloads, and increasing border enforcement. Congress passed $21.7 billion for this agency. Department of Commerce. The FY2002 request was $5.1 billion, 2% below the FY2001 funding level. Congress debated such issues as funding for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s (NOAA) next-generation weather satellites; local economic development activities; and the Technology Opportunities Program (TOP) grants. The enacted FY2002 budget for Commerce totaled $5.4 billion. Department of State. The FY2002 request was $7.5 billion, nearly 14% above the FY2001 enacted level. The Department had three top priorities in its FY2002 budget: hiring about 600 new staff in Foreign and Civil Service, as well as security professionals; continuing increases in embassy security; and more than doubling its current funds for information technology improvements worldwide. Congress passed $7.4 billion. The Judiciary. The FY2002 request was $4.9 billion, 14.5% above the FY2001 funding level. The Judiciary request included funds for cost-of-living salary increases for federal judges and justices, as well as $117 million for the first major renovation of the Supreme Court building since its opening in 1935. Congress approved $4.61 billion, an 8.4% increase over FY2001, including $37.5 million for the Supreme Court building and $8.6 million for a cost-of-living pay adjustment for judges and justices. Defense P.L. 107-117 – Vote Status Table: Internet-Linked: [http://www.crs.gov/products/appropriations/appover.shtml] Printer-Ready: [http://www.crs.gov/products/appropriations/apprint.pdf] CRS-5 CRS Report RL31005, Appropriations and Authorization for FY2002: Defense, coordinated by Amy Belasco and Stephen Daggett: February 2, 2002 (Excerpts from Summary and Most Recent Developments) Appropriations. On January 10, 2002, the President signed P.L. 107-117 (H.R. 3338), the FY2002 Department of Defense (DOD) Appropriations Act. In addition to providing the funding requested by the Administration for DOD, the Act allocated $20 billion from the Emergency Terrorism Response Supplemental (P.L. 107-38). Authorization. The President signed P.L. 107-107 (S.1438, H.Rept. 107-333), the FY2002 National Defense Authorization Act for FY2002. The Act provides $343.3 billion as requested by the Administration and authorizes another round of base closures, but delays the date to 2005, settling the chief issue in contention. District of Columbia P.L. 107-96 – Vote Status Table: Internet-Linked: [http://www.crs.gov/products/appropriations/appover.shtml] Printer-Ready: [http://www.crs.gov/products/appropriations/apprint.pdf] CRS Report RL31013, Appropriations for FY2002: District of Columbia, coordinated by Eugene Boyd and Michael Fauntroy. January 10, 2002 (Summary) On December 21, 2001, President Bush signed into law the District of Columbia Appropriations Act for FY2002, P.L.107-96 (formerly H.R. 2944). Two weeks earlier, the House on December 6, 2001, and the Senate on December 7, 2001, approved the conference report accompanying H.R. 2944, after resolving significant differences in the general provisions of their respective versions of the Act. The Act, which appropriates $408 million in special federal payments, includes $16 million for reimbursement to the District for the cost of providing security for a cancelled World Bank and International Monetary Fund meeting, and for security planning in the wake of the attacks on the Pentagon and World Trade Center on September 11, 2001. In addition, the Act approves the city’s $5.3 billion operating budget for the current fiscal year. The Act lifts the ban on the use of District funds for a domestic partners health insurance act approved by the city council and signed by the mayor in 1992. Congress has maintained the prohibition on the use of federal and District funds for needle exchange programs, rejecting a Senate provision that would have lifted the prohibition on the use of District funds for such activities. The Act lifts the restriction on the location of such activities near public and charter schools. The Act, as passed by Congress, requires the District of Columbia public schools to submit to Congress a report that identifies all judgments against the D.C. public schools under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act. The District’s FY2002 budget request was submitted to Congress on May 25, 2001. The city budget request included $199 million in federal payments to the District of Columbia. The city’s budget proposal included $5.3 billion in general operating fund expenditures, and $611 million in enterprise funds. The budget also CRS-6 included $78 million in funding for the newly created Health Care Safety Net Administration, which replaced the city’s discredited Public Benefits Corporation. Earlier in 2001, House and Senate District of Columbia Appropriations Subcommittees held hearings that focused on child and family services, and proposed reforms of the family division of the District of Columbia Superior Court. P.L. 107-96 includes $24 million for a new Family Court Division of the District’s Superior Court, including $500,000 for the Child and Family Services Agency. The committees also held hearings on the courts, corrections, the fiscal condition of the city, and the future role of the Chief Financial Officer. On April 30, 2001, the control board, which was created by Congress to address the city’s fiscal and governance problems, approved a resolution that abolished the Public Benefits Corporation and transferred responsibility for the administration of health care services to the Health Care Safety Net Administration. The Authority also awarded a contract for health care services to Greater Southeast Community Hospital and the Health Care Alliance. Energy and Water Development P.L. 107-66 – Vote Status Table: Internet-Linked: [http://www.crs.gov/products/appropriations/appover.shtml] Printer-Ready: [http://www.crs.gov/products/appropriations/apprint.pdf] CRS Report RL31007, Appropriations for FY2002: Energy and Water Development, coordinated by Marc Humphries and Carl Behrens: February 5, 2002 (Most Recent Developments) The Energy and Water Development appropriations bill includes funding for civil works projects of the Army Corps of Engineers, the Department of the Interior’s Bureau of Reclamation (BOR), most of the Department of Energy (DOE), and a number of independent agencies. The Bush Administration requested $22.5 billion for these programs for FY2002 compared with $23.6 billion appropriated in FY2001. The House bill (H.R. 2311), passed on June 28, 2001, allocated $23.7 billion for these programs. The Senate approved its version of the bill July 19, 2001, with $25.0 billion. The final bill appropriating $25.086 billion was approved by both houses on November 1, 2001 and enacted on November 12, 2001 as P.L. 107-66. Key issues involving Energy and Water Development appropriations programs included: ! authorization of appropriations for major water/ecosystem restoration initiatives for the Florida Everglades and California “Bay-Delta”; ! general provisions concerning operation of federal water projects on the Missouri River; ! proposed reductions in spending for solar and renewable energy; ! the electrometallurgical treatment of nuclear spent fuel for storage and disposal, a process that opponents contend raises nuclear proliferation concerns; CRS-7 ! cost and management of the National Ignition Facility (NIF) in DOE’s Nuclear Weapons Stewardship program; ! restricted funding of physical sciences research in DOE contrasted with major increases in life sciences research in the National Institutes of Health; and ! proposed higher funding for DOE’s civilian nuclear waste management program as the Department nears a decision on building a waste repository under Nevada’s Yucca Mountain. Foreign Operations P.L. 107-115 – Vote Status Table: Internet-Linked: [http://www.crs.gov/products/appropriations/appover.shtml] Printer-Ready: [http://www.crs.gov/products/appropriations/apprint.pdf] CRS Report RL31011: Appropriations for FY2002: Foreign Operations, Export Financing, and Related Programs, by Larry Nowels: February 4, 2002 (Most Recent Developments) The annual Foreign Operations appropriations bill is the primary legislative vehicle through which Congress reviews the U.S. foreign aid budget and influences executive branch foreign policy making generally. It contains the largest share–over two-thirds–of total U.S. international affairs spending. President Bush requested $15.167 billion for FY2002 Foreign Operations, an amount 1.5% higher than enacted FY2001 appropriations. By comparison, foreign policy resources proposed for State Department, U.N. contributions, and other non-foreign aid activities would increase by 13.2% from FY2001, in nominal terms. Although the overall FY2002 Foreign Operations proposed increase was relatively small–$224 million–some activities funded in FY2001 would either not need new appropriations or would require smaller resources in FY2002, thereby freeing funds for other initiatives. After adjusting the FY2001 base amount to reflect these reduced funding requirements that did not alter current policy, the request represented a higher increase for Foreign Operations–$698 million, or 4.8% more, in nominal terms. The FY2002 Foreign Operations request set most accounts at or near FY2001 funding levels, while largely concentrating proposals to increase spending in a few areas–disaster aid, global health, international narcotics control, and contributions to the World Bank and other international financial institutions. Likewise, the budget submission recommended cutting appropriations significantly in two accounts–debt reduction resources for the Heavily Indebted Poor Country (HIPC) initiative and the Export-Import Bank–but only the latter represented a policy shift. Except in one area, the FY2002 budget request represented few changes in the list of top U.S. foreign aid recipients. Israel, Egypt, and Jordan remained the leading recipients. The most significant change was the increase in aid for Latin American drug-producing nations. Under the Administration’s Andean Counterdrug Initiative, Colombia, Peru, and Bolivia would be among the leading 10 recipients of U.S. aid. CRS-8 Following nearly 6 months of debate, Congress cleared for the President on December 20, 2001, a $15.35 billion Foreign Operations Appropriations for FY2002 (P.L. 107-115; H.R. 2506). The measure is roughly midway between levels passed earlier by the House ($15.17 billion) and the Senate ($15.52 billion), and $178 million higher than requested by the President. This marks one of the few occasions when Congress has approved more spending for Foreign Operations than sought by the Administration. The amount is about $400 million, or 2.7%, higher than for FY2001 (excluding the $1.1 billion for Foreign Operations programs allocated from the terrorism emergency supplemental measure, P.L. 107-38). Highlights of the bill include: $779 million for the Export-Import Bank, nearly $100 million more than requested; $475 million for HIV/AIDS, up from the $429 million proposal; and $625 million for the Andean Counternarcotics Initiative, a cut of $106 million from the request. The enacted measure drops Senate-passed language overturning the President’s international family planning restrictions, but approved funding levels for population aid and UNFPA near the higher Senate-passed amounts. Interior P.L. 107-63 – Vote Status Table: Internet-Linked: [http://www.crs.gov/products/appropriations/appover.shtml] Printer-Ready: [http://www.crs.gov/products/appropriations/apprint.pdf] CRS Report RL31006, Appropriations for FY2002: Interior and Related Agencies, coordinated by Carol Hardy-Vincent and Susan Boren: February 1, 2002 (Summary) The Interior and Related Agencies Appropriations bill includes funds for the Department of the Interior (DOI), except the Bureau of Reclamation, and funds for some agencies or programs within three other departments–Agriculture, Energy, and Health and Human Services. It also funds numerous smaller agencies. On April, 9, 2001, President Bush submitted his FY2002 budget for Interior and Related Agencies, totaling $18.19 billion compared to the $19.07 billion enacted for FY2001 (P.L. 106-291). These figures reflect scorekeeping adjustments. Title VIII of the FY2001 law created a new discretionary “conservation spending category.” On June 19, 2001, the House Appropriations Committee reported the FY2002 Interior and Related Agencies Appropriations bill (H.R. 2217, H.Rept. 107-103). The House debated and passed H.R. 2217 (376-32) on June 21, 2001, with a total of $19.0 billion. On June 29, 2001, the Senate Appropriations Committee reported H.R. 2217 (S.Rept. 107-36) with amendments. The Senate debated the bill on July 11 and 12, 2001, and passed H.R. 2217 by voice vote on July 12, 2001,with a total of $18.53 billion, a lower level than the House. House and Senate conferees met on October 10, 2001, and filed a report containing their agreement (H.Rept. 107-234) on October 11, 2001. On October 17, 2001, the conference report passed the House (380-28) and the Senate (95-3). The bill was signed into law on November 5, 2001 (P.L. 107-63). CRS-9 The FY2002 law contains a total of $19.18 billion, higher than the House and Senate levels. For agencies within DOI, it contains $9.44 billion, while the Forest Service is funded at $4.13 billion. There is $1.77 billion for energy programs, and $2.76 billion for the Indian Health Service. The Smithsonian Institution receives $497.2 million; the National Endowment for the Arts, $98.2 million; and the National Endowment for the Humanities, $124.5 million. The conferees addressed a number of significant energy and mineral issues. The FY2002 law drops provisions that barred funds from being used to: suspend or revise existing hardrock mining regulations, implement the Kyoto Protocol, or execute a final lease agreement for oil and gas drilling in the “Lease Sale 181" area of the Gulf of Mexico. It includes provisions to bar the use of funds for offshore energy leasing activities in several areas, and for energy leasing activities within presidentially-proclaimed national monuments as they were on January 20, 2001. The law also extends the Recreational Fee Demonstration Program for 2 years, and modifies the Steel Loan Guarantee Program. In response to the terrorist attacks on the United States on September 11, 2001, a $40 billion emergency supplemental appropriation was enacted (P.L. 107-38). The National Park Service has received $3.1 million of the initial fund allocation for emergency response costs in New York City and Washington D.C. Labor/HHS/Education P.L. 107-116 – Vote Status Table: Internet-Linked: [http://www.crs.gov/products/appropriations/appover.shtml] Printer-Ready: [http://www.crs.gov/products/appropriations/apprint.pdf] CRS Report RL31003, Appropriations for FY2002: Labor, Health and Human Services, and Education, by Paul M. Irwin: March 11, 2002 (Summary) This report tracks the enactment by the 107th Congress of the FY2002 appropriations for the Departments of Labor, Health and Human Services, and Education, and Related Agencies (L-HHS-ED). This Act provides discretionary funds for three federal departments and related agencies. The report summarizes L-HHS-ED discretionary funding issues, but not authorization or entitlement issues. On April 9, 2001, the President submitted the FY2002 budget request to the Congress. The L-HHS-ED request was $116.3 billion for discretionary programs; the FY2001 appropriations was $109.7 billion, enacted primarily through P.L. 106-554. The House version of the FY2002 L-HHS-ED bill, H.R. 3061, passed with a discretionary total of $123.5 billion; the Senate version of H.R. 3061 (first reported as S. 1536) passed with a discretionary total of $124.2 billion. The conference version of H.R. 3061 was signed into law January 10, 2002, as P.L. 107-116, with a discretionary total of $124.3 billion, 13.3% more than for FY2001. A series of eight continuing resolutions provided interim FY2002 funding prior to January 10, 2002. CRS-10 U.S. Department of Labor (DOL): DOL discretionary appropriations were $11.7 billion in FY2001; $12.0 billion is enacted for FY2002. An increase of $153 million is provided for job training under the Workforce Investment Act. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS): DHHS discretionary appropriations were $47.0 billion in FY2001; $54.1 billion is enacted for FY2002. Increases are enacted of $3.0 billion for the National Institutes of Health, $1.4 billion for Low-Income Home Energy Assistance Program (LIHEAP), and $1.3 billion for the Child Care and Development Block Grant. Smaller increases are provided for Community Health Centers, Ryan White AIDS programs, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services Program Management, and Head Start. Funding is decreased for the LIHEAP Emergency Allocation. U.S. Department of Education (ED): ED discretionary appropriations were $42.2 billion in FY2001; $48.9 billion is enacted for FY2002. Increases are enacted of $1.6 billion each for Title I Part A Grants to Local Educational Agencies and Pell Grants, and $1.2 billion for Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) Part B Grants to States. Smaller increases are provided for reading programs, Impact Aid, teaching programs, 21st Century Community Learning Centers, Fund for the Improvement of Education, English Language Acquisition, and Higher Education programs. A State Assessments program receives initial funding of $387 million. School Repair and Renovation, funded at $1.2 billion in FY2001, is terminated. Related Agencies: Discretionary appropriations for related agencies were $8.7 billion in FY2001; $9.2 billion is enacted for FY2002. Increases are enacted of $277 million for the Supplemental Security Income (SSI) program and $167 million for Administrative Expenses at the Social Security Administration (SSA). Legislative Branch P.L. 107-68 – Vote Status Table: Internet-Linked: [http://www.crs.gov/products/appropriations/appover.shtml] Printer-Ready: [http://www.crs.gov/products/appropriations/apprint.pdf] CRS Report RL31012, Appropriations for FY2002: Legislative Branch, by Paul Dwyer: February 27, 2002 (Summary) Congress appropriated $2.97 billion for legislative branch operations in FY2002, an 8.9% increase over the FY2001 funding level of $2.73 billion. The FY2002 bill, signed into P.L. 107-68, contains funds for 79 new Capitol Police positions, funds for Capitol Police training programs, language providing comparability in the pay of the Capitol Police with the Uniformed Division of the Secret Service and the Park Police, an 18.1% increase in the police budget, an additional $70 million for construction of the Capitol visitors’ center, and several measures to recruit and retain employees of the Senate and the congressional support agencies. The Senate version of the FY2002 bill contained $1.9 billion for legislative activities, excluding those of the House, a 5.6% ($103.1 million) increase over CRS-11 FY2001's level of $1.8 billion. The House version contained $2.2 billion, excluding Senate activities, a 4.4% ($95 million) increase from $2.144 billion in FY2001. Since final action was not completed by the end of FY2001, Congress approved continuing resolutions funding the legislative branch at its FY2001 level. In July 2001, Congress also agreed to a $79.5 million FY2001 legislative branch supplemental appropriation (P.L. 107-20), containing $61.7 million for House internal operations, $1 million for the Capitol Police, and $15.9 million for the Government Printing Office. The terrorists’ attacks of September 11, 2001, prompted moves toward an even more stringent security environment on Capitol Hill, which affected the legislative branch budget. On September 21 and September 28, the President released $86.45 million for Capitol Hill security measures. These funds were part of a $40 billion FY2001 terrorism emergency supplemental bill approved by Congress on September 14, and signed into P.L. 107-38 on September 18. The President proposed, and Congress approved, an additional allocation for Capitol complex security of $265.1 million, which, unlike the other allocations for security, required approval by Congress. The $265.1 million supplemental was contained in P.L. 107-117, the FY2002 Department of Defense Appropriations Act, signed by the President on January 10, 2002. Among elements considered by Congress were proposals to: ! merge the Capitol Hill, Library of Congress, and Government Printing Office police into a consolidated force; Senate report language directed the General Accounting Office to study the issue; ! authorize and fund programs to enhance staff retention and recruitment, such as repayment of student loans, and implementation of performance-based recognition and compensation proposals; P.L. 107-68 contains language authorizing student loan repayments for employees of the Senate and Congressional Budget Office; and ! approve $42.5 million for repair of the Capitol dome; P.L. 107-68 contains $1.6 million for painting. Military Construction P.L. 107-64 – Vote Status Table: Internet-Linked: [http://www.crs.gov/products/appropriations/appover.shtml] Printer-Ready: [http://www.crs.gov/products/appropriations/apprint.pdf] CRS Report RL31010, Appropriations for FY2002: Military Construction, by Daniel H. Else: November 7, 2001 (Most Recent Developments) The House Appropriations Committee marked up the Military Construction Appropriations bill for FY2002 (H.R. 2904) on September 20, 2001, with House passage the next day on a 401-0 vote (vote no. 344). The Senate Appropriations Committee marked up its version of the bill (S. 1460) on September 25 and passed it the next day on a unanimous vote of 97-0 (vote no. 288). Although both bills CRS-12 appropriated $10.5 billion, falling within adjusted 302(b) budget allocations, they differed in how the funding was allocated. Conferees met on October 16, 2001, and issued the conference report (H.Rept. 107-246) on H.R. 2904. The House approved the report on October 17 with a vote of 409-1 (vote no. 394). The Senate approved the report on October 18 with a vote of 96-1 (vote no. 305), clearing the measure for the President. The President signed the bill on November 5, 2001, enacting it as P.L. 107-64 (115 Stat. 474). Transportation P.L. 107-87 – Vote Status Table: Internet-Linked: [http://www.crs.gov/products/appropriations/appover.shtml] Printer-Ready: [http://www.crs.gov/products/appropriations/apprint.pdf] CRS Report RL31008, Appropriations for FY2002: Department of Transportation and Related Agencies, coordinated by Robert S. Kirk and David Randall Peterman: January 15, 2002 (Summary) On December 18, 2001, the President Bush signed the FY2002 Department of Transportation (DOT) and Related Agencies conference agreement (H.Rept. 107-308), appropriating a total of $59.588 billion for DOT, a 2.5% increase over the FY2001 enacted level. The enacted bill provides $507 million more than the House-passed version and $391 million less than the Senate-passed bill. At $32.895 billion, the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) will receive slightly less than in FY 2001. The Federal Railroad Administration (FRA) will receive $734 million, $21 million less than in FY2001. The other major agencies all get increases. The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) budget will increase roughly 6% to $13.295 billion; the Federal Transit Administration (FTA) budget will increase 8% to $6.747 billion; and the Coast Guard will receive an increase of 12% to $5.031 billion. The Act also includes $1.25 billion (to be offset by user fee collections) for the new Transportation Security Administration (TSA). The enacted conference agreement mandates significant safety and inspection requirements be met by Mexico-domiciled trucks before DOT begins processing Mexican applications for operating authority in the U.S. beyond the commercial zones along the border. It does, however, include a number of modifications in response to Administration concerns that the original Senate bill (as well as the House bill) violated provisions of the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA). The conference agreement created a controversy when the conferees redirected and earmarked $997.6 million of Revenue Aligned Budget Authority (RABA) funds. The RABA mechanism adjusts DOT program authorization and obligation levels to reflect recent fuel tax revenues (by increasing or decreasing both the authorization and the obligation limitation). For FY2002, this added $4.5 billion to DOT programs. This redirection of RABA funds reduces the RABA portion of the states’ formula funding by 10.7% from what they otherwise would have received. Authorizers see this action as a usurpation of their authority, and some vowed to oppose this sort of action in the future. CRS-13 Congress responded to the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, by passing the 2001 Emergency Supplemental Appropriations Act for Recovery from and Response to Terrorist Attacks on the United States (P.L. 107-38). That Act provides $40 billion, government-wide, to pay the costs of a variety of responses, including “providing increased transportation security.” As of this writing, roughly $1.9 billion of these emergency supplemental funds have been approved for transfer to DOT. Treasury/Postal Service P.L. 107-67 – Vote Status Table: Internet-Linked: [http://www.crs.gov/products/appropriations/appover.shtml] Printer-Ready: [http://www.crs.gov/products/appropriations/apprint.pdf] CRS Report RL31002, Appropriations for FY2002: Treasury, Postal Service, Executive Office of the President, and General Government, coordinated by Sharon S. Gressle: January 16, 2002 (Summary) The Treasury, Postal Service, Executive Office of the President, and General Government FY2002 appropriation, P.L. 107-67, totals $32.4 billion. Congressional Budget Office scorekeeping puts the totals at $32.8 billion ($15.7 billion mandatory and $17.1 discretionary. The House passed an appropriation totaling $32.7 billion. The Senate-passed bill would have funded the accounts at $32.8 billion. The conference agreement would provide a 4.6% pay adjustment in January 2002 for federal civilian employees. Several of the accounts within the bill are also receiving funding through the Emergency Response Fund under P.L. 107-38 and P.L. 107-117. On April 9, 2001, President George W. Bush submitted his FY2002 budget to Congress. The budget documents show, for accounts funded through the Treasury, Postal Service, and General Government appropriations bill, a proposed FY2002 discretionary budget authority of $16.6 billion and proposed outlays of $16.3 billion. This represents a $1 billion increase over the FY2001 enacted estimates (estimates do not reflect the enacted FY2001 supplemental). Realistically, the estimates that were offered earlier in the year are no longer current. Several of the covered accounts fund activities affected either directly by, or as a consequence of response to, the attacks of September 11. Accounts in the Department of the Treasury, Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, and Firearms, U.S. Customs Service, U.S. Secret Service, and the General Services Administration usually receive funding for functions related to countering terrorism. Emergency Response Fund allocations, as provided by P.L. 107-38, the Emergency Supplemental Appropriations Act for Recovery from and Response to Terrorist Attacks on the United States, FY2001, have gone to accounts in the Department of the Treasury, the Executive Office of the President and the General Services Administration. To date, those accounts have been allocated $147.5 million from the Emergency Response Fund. Those allocations are not included in the totals above. Pursuant to recent negotiations, between the White House and Congress, on new overall funding levels, the October 9 House allocation for the spending allocations for CRS-14 the Treasury and General Government accounts remain at $17.022 billion. The Senate Appropriations Committee allocated $17.118 billion on October 11. Veterans Affairs/Housing and Urban Development P.L. 107-73 – Vote Status Table: Internet-Linked: [http://www.crs.gov/products/appropriations/appover.shtml] Printer-Ready: [http://www.crs.gov/products/appropriations/apprint.pdf] CRS Report RL31004, Appropriations for FY2002: VA, HUD, and Independent Agencies, coordinated by Dennis W. Snook and E. Richard Bourdon: December 7, 2001 (Summary) P.L. 107-73, the FY2002 appropriations bill (H.R. 2620) for the Departments of Veterans Affairs (VA) and Housing and Urban Development (HUD), and several independent agencies, provides $112.7 billion for FY2002, including $85.4 billion in discretionary funds. The versions of H.R. 2620 passed by each Chamber were relatively close in the total amount approved for programs funded through the bill, although there were serious differences in some areas, and both versions differed from the Administration’s request. For instance: ! Both houses added to the request for VA medical programs, with the Senate adding $400 million, and the House, $303 million. Conferees split the difference, providing $351 million more than requested, but dropped a House plan to add $300 million to rehabilitate VA facilities to improve patient safety. ! The Senate offered slightly over $1 billion more than the House in housing and urban assistance money; the House had approved about $600 million less than the Administration requested. Conferees settled on $30.1 billion, $168 million more than the House bill, but $866 million less than the Senate, and $433 less than requested. ! The House added $229 million, and the Senate $435 million to the request for EPA. Conferees topped both bills, and added $586 million to the request. ! The House did not fund programs of the Corporation for National and Community Service (which supports AmeriCorp), while the Administration proposed to maintain almost the same funding as in FY2001, and the Senate approved that amount and added $4 million; conferees provided $13 million less than the Senate. ! The Administration did not request emergency funding for FEMA’s disaster relief efforts; the House bill provided $1.3 billion in emergency relief funds, the Senate, $2 billion. Conferees provided $1.5 billion. ! The House added $367 million to the NSF request; the Senate added $200 million; conferees agreed to add $316 million to the request. ! The Senate added $50 million to the NASA request, while the House increased it by $440 million. Conferees settled on $282 million above the request. CRS-15 The President requested $83.4 billion in discretionary funds for programs covered by VA-HUD appropriations. H.Con.Res. 83, the Concurrent Resolution on the FY2002 Budget adopted by Congress, assumed $84.1 billion in discretionary funds. Following the September 11 terrorist attack, Congress passed legislation (P.L. 107-38) to provide $40 billion in emergency supplemental appropriations to aid victims, bolster counter-terrorism, and pursue the investigation and prosecution of those responsible. The new law contains $34.4 million for FEMA, and $3.2 million for EPA responses to terrorist acts. For Additional Reading Appropriations and Budget Process Appropriation and Budget Fact Sheets (CRS) provide short explanations of budget concepts, terminology, congressional and executive budget process, budget resolutions and reconciliation measures, authorization and appropriations process, entitlements and discretionary spending, Budget Enforcement Act and sequestration, surplus/deficits, and the debt limit. [http://www.crs.gov/products/guides/budget/index/BudgetIndex.shtml] CRS Report 97-684, Congressional Appropriations Process: An Introduction, by Sandy Streeter. CRS Report 98-721, Introduction to the Federal Budget Process, by Robert Keith. Budget FY2002 CRS Issue Brief IB10079, Budget Fiscal Year 2002, by Philip D. Winters. CRS Report RL30999, Budget FY2002: A Chronology with Internet Access, by Justin Murray. Continuing Resolutions CRS Report RL30343, Continuing Appropriations Acts: Brief Overview of Recent Practices, by Sandy Streeter. Debt and Economy CRS Report RS20645, Changes in Federal Debt and Its Major Components, 1996-2000, by Philip D. Winters. CRS Report RL30329, Current Economic Conditions and Selected Forecasts, by Gail E. Makinen. CRS-16 Social Security Surplus (Off-Budget) CRS Report 98-422, Social Security and the Federal Budget: What Does Social Security’s Being “Off-Budget” Mean? by David Stuart Koitz. Internet Access Appropriation Bills, Reports, Laws, Vetoes (FY1997-FY2002) Full-text: [http://www.access.gpo.gov/congress/legislation/appro.html] Appropriation Committees Sites, Publications, Membership House: [http://www.access.gpo.gov/congress/house/house02.html] Senate: [http://www.access.gpo.gov/congress/senate/senate03.html] Budget Process Institutes [http://www.crs.gov/services/general/briefings.shtml#budget] Budget Timetable [http://www.house.gov/rules/budget_time.htm] CBO Current Status of Discretionary Appropriations CBO estimates of the 13 appropriation subcommittees emergency and non-emergency discretionary appropriations showing budget authority and outlays, and 302(b) allocations. [http://www.cbo.gov/showdoc.cfm?index=2049&sequence=0&from=7] CBO Budget Reports Provides access to the Monthly Budget Review (Analysis of the Monthly Treasury Statement), Analysis of the President’s Budgetary Proposals, Economic and Budget Outlook and Updates, Long-Term Budgetary Pressures and Policy Options, and Spending and Revenue Options. [http://www.cbo.gov/byclasscat.cfm?header=2] CBO Unauthorized Appropriations/Expiring Authorizations Identifies “authorizing legislation that should be in place before it considers the 13 regular appropriation bills for the fiscal year.” [http://www.cbo.gov/byclasscat.cfm?cat=6] Debt Bureau of the Public Debt: [http://www.publicdebt.treas.gov/opd/opd.htm] How Much “Debt Held by the Public” Has Been Reduced in Recent Years? Cumulative FY1998-FY2001: $453 billion. FY2001: $90 billion. FY2000: $222.8 billion. FY1999: $88.7 billion. FY1998: $51.2 billion. See CRS Report RS20645, Changes in Federal Debt and Its Major Components, 1996-2000, by Philip D. Winters. CRS-17 Floor Agenda Provides a list of projected floor votes and CRS analysis. [http://www.crs.gov/products/flooraction/legalert.shtml] Glossaries CRS access to CRS Budget Index and Congressional Quarterly’s American Congressional Dictionary: [http://www.crs.gov/products/guides/budget/index/BudgetIndex.shtml] CBO: [http://www.cbo.gov/glossary.cfm] Senate: [http://www.senate.gov/~budget/republican/reference/cliff_notes/cliffapi.htm] OMB: Go to Budget Systems and Concepts (This is in PDF. Last chapter is Glossary of Budget Terms) [http://w3.access.gpo.gov/usbudget/fy2002/maindown.html] Locating Agencies/Programs in Appropriation Bills “I’m looking for a particular program, but I don’t know which appropriation bill it’s in.” Federal agencies may receive funds from more than one appropriations act. Consult the “Guide to Federal Programs” on the CRS FY2002 Appropriations Products Page, or the Senate Appropriations Committee jurisdiction site; both identify the major source of appropriated funds for federal agencies and programs. [http://www.crs.gov/products/appropriations/appprogs.shtml] [http://www.senate.gov/~appropriations/jurisd.htm] OMB Supplemental Requests [http://w3.access.gpo.gov/usbudget/fy2002/amndsup.html] (Note: Estimates 1 and 2 are from the Clinton Administration.) OMB Veto Indications Statements of Administration Policy (SAPs) present the Administration’s viewpoint on appropriation bills. [http://www.whitehouse.gov/omb/legislative/sap/107-1/subcommittee/] Rules Committee—House (Special Rules) [http://www.house.gov/rules/special_rules.htm] 302(b) Spending Allocations Appropriation Subcommittees House: [http://www.access.gpo.gov/congress/legislation/02appro.html#housesub] H.Rept. 107-230 (October 9, 2001); H.Rept. 107-208 (September 20, 2001; H.Rept. 107-165 (July 26, 2001); H.Rept. 107-161 (July 25, 2001); H.Rept. 107-153 (July 23, 2001); H.Rept. 107-104, revising the congressional budget for the U.S. government for fiscal year 2001 (June 19, 2001); H.Rept. 107-100 (June 13, 2001). Senate: [http://www.access.gpo.gov/congress/legislation/02appro.html#senate01] S.Rept. 107-110 (December 6, 2001); S.Rept. 107-98 (November 14, 2001); S.Rept. 107-81 (October 11, 2001); S.Rept. 107-65 (September 19, 2001); S.Rept. 107-50 (August 1, 2001); S.Rept. 107-45 (July 23, 2001); S.Rept. 107-44 (July 23, 2001); S.Rept. 107-40 (July 13, 2001); S.Rept. 107-34 (June 21, 2001); S.Rept. 107-35 (June 27, 2001). CRS-18 Budget/Appropriations Sequence The congressional budget and appropriations sequence ideally flows as shown below. However, in practice, the process is rarely so simple. (For more detailed information see CRS Report 98-721, Introduction to the Federal Budget Process.) The following links from GPO provide comprehensive access to the House and Senate Budget and Appropriation Committee Web sites, publications, hearings, prints, legislation, membership, jurisdiction, and rules: [http://www.access.gpo.gov/congress/house/hclinks.html] [http://www.access.gpo.gov/congress/senate/sclinks.html] ! President presents his budget proposals to Congress by the first Monday in February. [http://w3.access.gpo.gov/usbudget/] ! House and Senate Appropriation and Budget Committees hold hearings on the President’s budget, with testimony from the Administration, CBO, Federal Reserve, and others. ! CBO, which is an independent support agency for Congress, assists the Budget committees through the process with reports on economic forecasts, budgetary analysis, and deficit/surplus options, including The Economic and Budget Outlook and Update, An Analysis of the President’s Budget Proposals, and Budget Options. [http://www.cbo.gov/byclasscat.cfm?header=2] ! House and Senate Budget Committees receive Views and Estimates on spending and revenues from all full committees 6 weeks after the President’s budget is received. ! House and Senate Budget Committees report budget resolutions to the House and Senate, respectively. ! Each Chamber debates and considers amendments to the original resolution. ! Each Chamber adopts a budget resolution, with differences between the two versions resolved in a conference committee. ! Each Chamber adopts the final version. The budget resolution is not signed by the President and does not become public law. ! Each Appropriations subcommittee holds markups, in which they consider amendments and formulate the regular bill under their jurisdiction. Each subsequently reports its version to their respective Appropriations Committee. ! Full House and Senate Appropriations Committees hold markups on their subcommittees’ versions and report the committees’ versions to their respective Chambers. ! White House indications of opposition or support to appropriation and nonappropriation legislation scheduled for floor action in the second session 107th Congress, called Statements of Administration Policy (SAPs) are located at [http://www.whitehouse.gov/omb/legislative/sap/107-1/subcommittee/] ! House and Senate debate, consider amendments, and pass each regular bill; differences between the House- and Senate-passed bills are resolved in conference committee. The final version is adopted by both Chambers and sent to the President. If the bill is approved, it becomes law. Generally, either all 13 regular bills are enacted separately, or some are enacted together in an omnibus measure. ! House and Senate adopt continuing resolutions to provide short-term funding if the regular bills are not enacted by the October 1 deadline. CRS-19 Budget Resolution Votes On May 5, 2001, the FY2002 budget resolution conference report, H.Rept. 107-60 (H.Con.Res 83), was passed by the House by a vote of 221-207, vote #104. The Senate passed the conference report on May 10, 2001, by a vote of 53-47, vote #98. The President does not sign budget resolutions. Previously, on April 6, 2001, the Senate passed the FY2002 budget resolution by a vote of 65-35, vote #86. On March 28, 2001, the House passed H.Con.Res. 83, by a vote of 222-205, vote #70. The House rejected four other budget proposals: ! Kucinich amendment (Progressive Caucus), rejected by a vote of 343-79, vote #66. ! Stenholm amendment (Blue Dog Coalition), rejected by a vote of 221-204, vote #67. ! Flake amendment (Republican Study Committee), rejected by a vote of 34181, vote #68. ! Spratt amendment (Democratic alternative) rejected by a vote of 243-183, vote #69. For historical information on budget resolutions from FY1975-FY2000, see CRS Report RL30297, Congressional Budget Resolutions: Selected Statistics and Information Guide. CRS-20 Table 1. Administration Requests/Amounts Enacted (amounts in thousands) Calendar Year Amount Requested by President Amount Enacted Difference (under - / over +) 1981 541,827,828 554,457,424 +2,629,596 1982 507,740,133 514,832,375 +7,092,242 1983 542,956,052 551,620,505 +8,664,453 1984 576,343,259 559,151,836 -17,191,423 1985 588,698,504 583,446,885 -5,251,619 1986 590,345,199 577,279,102 -13,066,097 1987 618,268,049 614,526,518 -3,741,531 1988 621,250,664 625,967,373 +4,716,709 1989 652,138,432 666,211,681 +14,073,249 1990 704,510,962 697,257,740 -7,253,222 1991 756,428,167 748,448,990 -7,979,177 1992 776,072,233 764,493,308 -11,578,925 1993 818,126,396 788,612,998 -29,513,398 1994 786,217,794 783,750,779 -2,467,015 1995 804,207,430 761,097,096 -43,110,334 1996 801,214,439 793,403,352 -7,811,087 1997 799,196,397 787,614,002 -11,582,395 1998 859,790,825 864,003,763 +4,212,938 1999 916,704,274 920,554,725 +3,850,451 2000 992,530,515 1,007,263,577 +14,733,062 Source: House Committee on Appropriations, January 31, 2001. CRS-21 Table 2. Discretionary/Mandatory Outlays (in billions of dollars) Fiscal Year Discretionary Spending Entitlement/ Other Mandatory Spending Net Interest Offsetting Receipts Total 1981 307.9 339.4 68.8 -37.9 678.2 1982 325.9 370.8 85.0 -36.0 745.8 1983 353.3 410.6 89.8 -45.3 808.4 1984 379.4 405.6 111.1 -44.2 851.9 1985 415.7 448.3 129.5 -47.1 946.4 1986 438.5 461.8 136.0 -45.9 990.5 1987 444.2 474.2 138.7 -52.9 1,004.1 1988 464.4 505.1 151.8 -56.8 1,064.5 1989 488.8 549.7 169.0 -63.8 1,143.7 1990 500.5 626.9 184.4 -58.7 1,253.2 1991 533.3 702.4 194.5 -105.7 1,324.4 1992 534.6 716.1 199.4 -68.4 1,381.7 1993 541.0 736.4 198.7 -66.6 1,409.5 1994 543.9 783.6 203.0 -68.5 1,461.9 1995 545.7 817.7 232.2 -79.7 1,515.8 1996 534.5 856.9 241.1 -71.9 1,560.6 1997 548.9 896.3 244.0 -88.0 1,601.3 1998 554.7 938.6 241.2 -81.9 1,652.6 1999 575.0 976.8 229.7 -78.4 1,703.0 2000 617.0 1,029.8 223.2 -81.1 1,789.0 Source: Congressional Budget Office. The Economic and Budget Outlook: Fiscal Years 2002-2011. January 2001. Washington, GPO, 2001. Table F-8, p. 146.