Older Americans Act: Overview and Funding




Older Americans Act: Overview and Funding
Updated April 22, 2021
Congressional Research Service
https://crsreports.congress.gov
R43414




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Older Americans Act: Overview and Funding

Contents
Introduction ..................................................................................................................................... 1
Older Americans Act: Current Law ................................................................................................. 2
Title I. Declaration of Objectives; Definitions .......................................................................... 2
Title II. Administration on Aging .............................................................................................. 2

Aging and Disability Resource Centers .............................................................................. 4
Senior Medicare Patrol Program ......................................................................................... 5
Title III. Grants for State and Community Programs on Aging ................................................ 5
Title IV. Activities for Health, Independence, and Longevity ................................................... 6
Title V. Community Service Senior Opportunities Act ............................................................. 7
Title VI. Grants for Services for Native Americans .................................................................. 8
Title VII. Vulnerable Elder Rights Protection Activities ........................................................... 8

FY2021 Appropriations Overview .................................................................................................. 9
Annual Discretionary Appropriations ....................................................................................... 9
Appropriations Related to COVID-19 Response .......................................................................... 10
Families First Coronavirus Response Act ................................................................................ 11
Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act ............................................. 11
Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2021 .................................................................................. 12
American Rescue Plan Act of 2021 ......................................................................................... 13
OAA Funding History ................................................................................................................... 13

Figures
Figure 1. The Aging Network .......................................................................................................... 3
Figure 2. Older Americans Act, FY2021 Discretionary Appropriations ....................................... 10
Figure 3. Total Funding for Older Americans Act Programs, FY2011-FY2021 ........................... 14

Tables

Table A-1. Budget Authority for the Older Americans Act (OAA) Programs: FY2014-
FY2021 ....................................................................................................................................... 16
Table B-1. COVID-19 Additional Funding for Older Americans Act Programs, FY2020-
FY2021 ....................................................................................................................................... 21
Table C-1. Authorizations of Appropriations for Older Americans Act as Amended by the
Supporting Older Americans Act of 2020 (P.L. 116-131) .......................................................... 24

Appendixes
Appendix A. Older Americans Act Programs: FY2014-FY2021 Funding .................................... 15
Appendix B. COVID-19 Response Funding for Older Americans Act Programs ........................ 20
Appendix C. Authorizations of Appropriations for Older Americans Act (OAA) Programs ........ 23



link to page 30

Contacts
Author Information ........................................................................................................................ 27


Congressional Research Service

Older Americans Act: Overview and Funding

Introduction
The Older Americans Act (OAA) supports a wide range of social services and programs for
individuals aged 60 years or older. These include supportive services, congregate nutrition
services (i.e., meals served at group sites such as senior centers, community centers, schools,
churches, or senior housing complexes), home-delivered nutrition services, family caregiver
support, community service employment, the long-term care ombudsman program, and services
to prevent the abuse, neglect, and exploitation of older persons. Except for Title V, Community
Service Employment for Older Americans (CSEOA), all programs are administered by the
Administration on Aging (AOA) in the Administration for Community Living (ACL) within the
Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). Title V is administered by the Department of
Labor’s (DOL’s) Employment and Training Administration.
The OAA has been reauthorized and amended numerous times, since it was first enacted in 1965.
In the 116th Congress, both the House and the Senate passed legislation that would reauthorize the
OAA for a five-year period. On March 25, 2020 the President signed the Supporting Older
Americans Act of 2020 (P.L. 116-131) which authorizes appropriations for OAA programs
through FY2024.1
In response to the Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, Congress has passed the
following laws providing additional funding for OAA programs, among other activities.
 Families First Coronavirus Response Act––On March 18, 2020, the President
signed the Families First Coronavirus Response Act (FFCRA; P.L. 116-127),
which provides a total of $250 million in discretionary supplemental funding for
expanded food assistance for OAA nutrition services to states and tribal
organizations.
 Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act––On March 27, 2020, the
President signed the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act
(CARES; P.L. 116-136), which provides a total of $870 million in discretionary
supplemental funding for OAA nutrition services, supportive services, family
caregiver services, Aging and Disability Resource Centers (ADRCs), and elder
rights protection activities.
 Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2021––On December 27, 2020, the President
signed the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2021 (P.L. 116-260). Division N
provides a total of $175 million in additional mandatory funding for OAA
nutrition services to states and tribal organizations.
 American Rescue Plan Act of 2021––On March 12, 2021, the President signed
American Rescue Plan Act of 2021 (ARPA; P.L. 117-2). Title II, Subtitle L
provides a total of $1.434 billion in mandatory funding for OAA nutrition
services, supportive services to include COVID-19 vaccination outreach
(including transportation to vaccination sites) and activities to prevent and
mitigate social isolation related to COVID-19, family caregiver services, disease
prevention, grants for tribal organizations, and the long-term care ombudsman
program.

1 For more information on the OAA 2020 reauthorization, see CRS Report R46439, Older Americans Act: 2020
Reauthorization
.
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Older Americans Act: Overview and Funding

The following provides an overview of the Older Americans Act. It briefly describes the act’s
titles, highlighting selected provisions followed by FY2021 appropriations, additional
appropriations in response to the COVID-19 pandemic, and funding history.
Older Americans Act: Current Law
The OAA statutory language contains the following seven titles, which are summarized in this
section, highlighting selected activities:
 Title I sets policy objectives and defines terms;
 Title II establishes administrative functions for the executive branch;
 Title III authorizes grants to states and local entities for supportive and nutrition
services;
 Title IV authorizes grants for training, research, and demonstration projects in the
field of aging;
 Title V authorizes grants to states and national organizations to promote part-time
opportunities in community service activities for unemployed low-income older
individuals;
 Title VI authorizes grants for supportive and nutrition services to older Native
Americans;
 Title VII authorizes grants for vulnerable elder rights protection activities.
This section briefly describes each of the act’s titles, including FY2021 appropriations for each
title. Following sections provide a more detailed overview of FY2021 appropriations,
appropriations in response to the COVID-19 pandemic, and the act’s funding history.2 Table A-1
provides detailed OAA program budget authority for FY2014 through FY2021.
Title I. Declaration of Objectives; Definitions
Title I of the OAA sets out broad social policy objectives oriented toward improving the lives of
all older Americans, including adequate income in retirement, the best possible physical and
mental health, opportunity for employment, and comprehensive long-term care services, among
other objectives. Also, Title I provides definitions for various terms under the act. Title I does not
authorize appropriations.
Title II. Administration on Aging
Title II establishes the Administration on Aging (AOA) as the chief federal agency advocating for
older persons and sets out the responsibilities of AOA and the Assistant Secretary for Aging. The
Assistant Secretary is appointed by the President with the advice and consent of the Senate. Title
II also establishes the State and Territorial Units on Aging (SUAs), who serve as the state agency
primarily responsible for planning and policy development as well as administration of OAA
activities. In addition, the act authorizes the Assistant Secretary to make grants to eligible tribal
organizations for social and nutrition services to older Native Americans.
Title II also establishes Area Agencies on Aging (AAAs), which operate within a planning and
service area (PSA) designated by the SUA. AAAs serve as local entities who, either directly or

2 The funding amounts described in this report are in budget authority.
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Older Americans Act: Overview and Funding

through contract with local service providers (LSPs), oversee a comprehensive and coordinated
service system for the delivery of social, nutrition, and long-term services and supports to older
individuals. AAAs are required to be public or private nonprofit organizations. According to a
2020 survey of AAAs across the country, over one-third (39%) of AAAs are independent
nonprofit agencies, more than one-quarter (27%) are part of councils of government or regional
planning and development agencies, and another 27% are located within a county government. A
much smaller share are part of city governments (2%) or exist in another type of organizational
structure (5%).3 Collectively, these 56 SUAs, 622 AAAs and over 260 tribal and Native Hawaiian
organizations, and tens of thousands of aging and social service providers in local communities
comprise the Aging Network (see Figure 1).4 With respect to the distribution of federal funding,
AOA allocates federal funds authorized under OAA statutory funding formulas to SUAs and
tribal organizations. SUAs, in turn, award these funds to AAAs based on an intrastate funding
formula developed in accordance with AOA guidelines and approved by the Assistant Secretary.
Figure 1. The Aging Network

Source: Prepared by the Congressional Research Service.
Discretionary funding authorized under Title II goes toward program administration and Aging
and Disability Resource Centers (ADRCs), described in greater detail below, as well as other

3 National Association of Area Agencies on Aging, AAA National Survey Report: Meeting the Needs of Today’s Older
Adults, 2020
, https://www.n4a.org//Files/AAA-Survey-Report-2020%20Update-508.pdf.
4 Administration for Community Living (ACL), The Aging Network,
https://eldercare.acl.gov/Public/About/Aging_Network/Index.aspx; ACL, ACL FFY 2022 Evaluation Plan, p. 4,
https://acl.gov/sites/default/files/programs/2020-09/ACL%202022%20Evaluation%20Plan.docx.pdf. The 56 State
Units on Aging include the 50 states, 5 U.S. territories (American Samoa, Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana
Islands, Guam, Puerto Rico, U.S. Virgin Islands) and the District of Columbia.
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authorized activities that support the Aging Network and Elder Rights activities (see textbox
entitled “OAA Title II: Aging Network and Elder Rights Support Activities”). Program
administration funding for all Administration for Community Living (ACL) programs and
activities, which includes those authorized by the OAA, is funded at $41.1 million in FY2021.
OAA Title II: Aging Network and Elder Rights Support Activities
The following OAA programs and activities receive discretionary funding under OAA Title II:
Aging Network Support Activities

The National Eldercare Locator and Engagement program assists individuals, through a nationwide toll-free
phone number and website, in identifying community resources for older persons (https://eldercare.acl.gov/,
or 1-800-677-1116). It also supports model programs in senior civic engagement and volunteer engagement
(FY2021 funding is $2.0 million).

The Pension Counseling and Information Program provides funds to regional counseling projects that help older
Americans learn about and receive the retirement benefits to which they are entitled. This program also
supports the National Education and Resource Center on Women and Retirement Planning, which provides
workshops and information on financial education and retirement planning for women (FY2021 funding is
$1.9 million).
Elder Rights Support Activities

The National Center on Elder Abuse provides information to the public and professionals regarding elder abuse
prevention activities, and provides training and technical assistance to state elder abuse agencies and to
community-based organizations (https://ncea.acl.gov, FY2021 funding is about $765,000).

The National Long-Term Care Ombudsman Resource Center provides training and technical assistance to state
and local long-term care ombudsmen (http://www.ltcombudsman.org, FY2021 funding is about $516,000).
Source: Email communication with G. Steven Hagy, director, ACL Office of Budget and Finance, January 7, 2021;
Explanatory statement submitted by Rep. Lowey, Chairwoman of the House Committee on Appropriations
regarding the House Amendment to the Senate Amendment to H.R. 133, Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2021,
Congressional Record, December 21, 2020, pp. H8632, H8679-H8680; HHS, ACL, Fiscal Year 2021 Justification of
Estimates for Appropriations Committees
, pp. 91-97 and 149-155.
Note: ACL reported combined program funding for the National Eldercare Locator and civic engagement under
National Eldercare Locator and Engagement; however, civic engagement activities are authorized under OAA Title
IV, Section 417, and included under Title II activities for simplicity.
Aging and Disability Resource Centers
The Aging and Disability Resource Center (ADRC)/No Wrong Door System (NWD) assists with
state efforts to streamline access to and provide information about the range of public and private
long-term services and supports (LTSS) options available to consumers. The NWD initiative is a
collaborative effort among ACL, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS), and the
Department of Veterans Affairs (VA). ACL has provided planning grants to states to deliver
person-centered options counseling and to provide access and information about programs that
provide LTSS such as Medicaid, the Older Americans Act, and VA programs, as well as state-
funded programs. There are 1,322 access points nationwide, operating across 56 states and
territories, as well as the District of Columbia.5 These sites include local AAAs and ADRCs;
Centers for Independent Living; Statewide Independent Living Councils; University Centers for
Excellence in Developmental Disabilities Education, Research, and Services; and tribal

5 ACL, Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, and Department of Veterans Affairs, No Wrong Door,
https://nwd.acl.gov. For more information see, ACL, Aging and Disability Resource Centers Program/No Wrong Door
System, https://acl.gov/programs/connecting-people-services/aging-and-disability-resource-centers-programno-wrong-
door.
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Older Americans Act: Overview and Funding

organizations. Discretionary funding to ADRCs is $8.1 million in FY2021.6 In addition, the
CARES Act, provides $50.0 million in supplemental funding to ADRCs to prevent, prepare for,
and respond to coronavirus.7 This funding is to remain available until September 30, 2021.
Senior Medicare Patrol Program
Also authorized under Titles II and IV (Sections 201, 202, and 411) of the OAA is the Senior
Medicare Patrol (SMP) Program, which funds projects that educate older Americans and their
families to recognize and report Medicare and Medicaid fraud. Beginning in FY2016,
discretionary funding under ACL’s budget authority is no longer provided for SMP. Instead,
appropriations language has funded SMP activities under discretionary appropriations from the
Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) Health Care Fraud and Abuse Control
(HCFAC) account. This account distributes funding to various antifraud activities from the
Medicare Trust Fund at the joint discretion of the HHS Secretary and Attorney General, and
distributes certain discretionary appropriations at the discretion of Congress. The Consolidated
Appropriations Act, 2021 (P.L. 116-260) instructs the HHS Secretary to provide not less than
$20.0 million from HCFAC to SMP in FY2021.8
Title III. Grants for State and Community Programs on Aging
Title III authorizes grants to SUAs and AAAs to act as advocates on behalf of and to coordinate
programs for older persons.9 Title III accounts for 73.2% of the OAA’s total FY2021 funding
($1.558 billion out of $2.129 billion). In addition, a combined $1.567 billion in additional Title III
funding is appropriated under the P.L. 116-260, Division N, and P.L. 117-2, Title II, Subtitle L for
FY2021. States receive separate allotments of funds based on a statutory funding formula for
supportive services and centers, congregate nutrition, home-delivered nutrition, the nutrition
services incentive grant program, disease prevention and health promotion services, and family
caregiver support.10 The OAA allows states some flexibility to transfer funds among Title III
programs. Specifically, the OAA authorizes SUAs to transfer up to 40% of funds received
between the congregate nutrition and home-delivered nutrition services programs and up to 30%
of funds received between these nutrition services programs and the supportive services and
centers program.11 For example, in FY2016, the most recent year for which data are available,

6 Beginning in FY2009, Congress provided mandatory funding under the Medicare Improvements for Patients and
Providers Act (MIPPA, P.L. 110-275; 42 U.S.C. 1395b-3 note) for Medicare enrollment assistance to Aging Disability
Resource Centers (ADRCs), as well as Area Agencies on Aging (AAAs), State Health Insurance and Assistance
Programs (SHIPs), and the National Center for Benefits Outreach and Enrollment. ADRCs receive $5 million in
mandatory funding for FY2021 under P.L. 116-260, the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2021.
7 CARES Act ADRC funding allocations by state are described in “How was the funding formula determined? What is
the funding allocation?” in ACL, ADRC/No Wrong Door System Funding Opportunity: Critical Relief Funds for
COVID-19 Pandemic Response: COVID-19 ADRC Emergency Funding Opportunity
, April 10, 2020, p. 3,
https://acl.gov/sites/default/files/common/ACL_COVID-19_Emergency_Funding_FAQ_PostWebinar.pdf.
8 P.L. 116-260, Division H, Title II.
9 U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Community Living, Administration on Aging,
FY2016 Report to Congress: Older Americans Act, p. 3, https://acl.gov/sites/default/files/about-acl/2019-
02/FY2016_OAA%20Report%20to%20Congress.pdf.
10 State allotments for Title III programs are listed at HHS, ACL, State and Tribal Funding Allocations,
https://acl.gov/about-acl/older-americans-act-oaa.
11 OAA Section 308(b)(4)(A) and (5)(A).
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states collectively transferred a net total of $96.8 million from congregate nutrition to either
supportive services or home-delivered nutrition.12
Title III services are available to all persons aged 60 and older, but are targeted at those with the
greatest economic or social need, particularly low-income and minority persons, older individuals
with limited English proficiency, and older persons residing in rural areas. Means testing is
prohibited.13 Participants are encouraged to make voluntary contributions for services they
receive. States are allowed to implement cost-sharing policies for certain services based on a
sliding-scale fee, but older persons must not be denied services due to failure to make cost-
sharing payments. State, local, and private funding sources also supplement federal OAA funds
for these services.
In 2019, the most recent year for which data are available, about 10.9 million older persons were
served by Title III programs.14 Title III services included the provision of 149.8 million home-
delivered meals; 73.2 million congregate meals; 20.4 million rides to medical appointments,
grocery stores, and other activities; 49.3 million hours of personal care, homemaker, and chore
services; and 12.1 million hours of adult day care/adult day health services in 2019.15
Title IV. Activities for Health, Independence, and Longevity
Title IV of the OAA authorizes the Assistant Secretary for Aging to award funds for training,
research, and demonstration projects in the field of aging. Over the years, Title IV has supported a
wide range of research and demonstration projects, including those related to income, health,
housing, retirement, and long-term services and supports, as well as projects on career preparation
and continuing education for personnel in the field of aging. Title IV activities receive $42.0
million in discretionary funding for FY2021. Funding provided under Title IV goes toward
various activities that are designed to support health, independence, and longevity of older
individuals (see textbox entitled “OAA Title IV: Activities for Health, Independence, and
Longevity”).16 Among these activities are the Alzheimer’s Disease Program, which receives a
total of $27.5 million in funding for FY2021, of which $12.8 million is discretionary budget
authority included in this report and another $14.7 million is mandatory funding from the
Prevention and Public Health Fund (PPHF).

12 U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Community Living, Administration on Aging,
FY2016 Report to Congress: Older Americans Act,
p. 16, https://acl.gov/sites/default/files/about-acl/2019-
02/FY2016_OAA%20Report%20to%20Congress.pdf.
13 OAA Section 315.
14 U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Community Living, AGing Integrated Database
(AGID), State Program Reports, Data at a Glance
, https://agid.acl.gov/DataGlance/SPR/.
15 Ibid.
16 Title IV Section 411 also authorizes Falls Prevention activities; $5.0 million was provided for these activities in
FY2021 under mandatory funding for the Prevention and Public Health Fund. (Explanatory statement submitted by
Rep. Lowey, Chairwoman of the House Committee on Appropriations regarding the House Amendment to the Senate
Amendment to H.R. 133, Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2021, Congressional Record, December 21, 2020, pp.
H8634, H8680).
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OAA Title IV: Activities for Health, Independence, and Longevity
The following OAA programs and activities receive discretionary funding under Title IV authorities:
Aging Network Support Activities

National Resource Centers on Native American Elders provide research and technical information on health, long-
term services and supports, elder abuse, mental health, and other issues relevant to older Native Americans
(FY2021 funding is $655,000).

National Minority Aging Organizations Technical Assistance Centers provide culturally and linguistically appropriate
information on health promotion and disease prevention for Asian-Pacific American, Native American,
Hispanic, and African-American older individuals, and older lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT)
persons (FY2021 funding is $1.2 million).

Program Performance and Technical Assistance supports the development of outcome measures and
performance measurement tools to assess the results of OAA programs (FY2021 funding is $1.7 million).

Holocaust Survivor’s Assistance provides supportive services for aging Holocaust survivors living in the United
States (FY2021 funding is $5.0 million).

Care Corps Grants support public agencies and nonprofits in placing volunteers to provide nonmedical care to
help family caregivers, seniors, and individuals with disabilities to maintain independence (FY2021 funding is
$4.0 million).
Elder Rights Support Activities

Legal Assistance and Supports funds two different activities. First, Model Approaches help states integrate Adult
Protective Services into broader state legal service delivery networks. Second, Legal Assistance and Support
grants fund services to professionals and advocates working in legal, elder rights, and aging and disability
services to further develop resources available to older individuals with social or economic needs (FY2021
funding is $2.6 million).

Elder Justice/Adult Protective Services (APS) provides funding for demonstration grants to states to enhance their
APS Systems, technical assistance to states with regard to the national APS data collection effort, and
research in the areas of elder abuse, neglect, and exploitation (FY2021 funding is $14.0 million).
Alzheimer’s Disease Program

Provides funding for competitive grants to states and community-based organizations to provide services and
training to individuals with Alzheimer’s Disease and Related Dementia. ACL also funds a training and technical
assistance resource center (FY2021 funding $12.8 million).
Source: Email communication with G. Steven Hagy, director, ACL Office of Budget and Finance, January 7, 2021;
Explanatory statement submitted by Rep. Lowey, Chairwoman of the House Committee on Appropriations
regarding the House Amendment to the Senate Amendment to H.R. 133, Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2021,
Congressional Record, December 21, 2020, pp. H8632, H8679-H8680; HHS, ACL, Fiscal Year 2021 Justification of
Estimates for Appropriations Committees
, pp. 91-97, 115-119, and 149-155.
Note: FY2021 funding for the Elder Justice Initiative may also be used for activities authorized under OAA §751
and the Elder Justice Act (§2042(a) of the Social Security Act).
Title V. Community Service Senior Opportunities Act
Title V, Community Service Senior Opportunities Act, also known as Community Service
Employment for Older Americans (CSEOA) or the Senior Community Service Employment
Program (SCSEP), has as its purpose the promotion of useful part-time opportunities in
community service activities for unemployed low-income17 persons who are 55 years or older and
who have poor employment prospects. The Title V program is administered by DOL’s
Employment and Training Administration; it is the only OAA program not administered by HHS
under ACL. For FY2021, Title V represents 19.0% of OAA discretionary funding ($405.0 million

17 Participants’ incomes must be no greater than 125% of the federal poverty guidelines, 20 C.F.R. §641.500. For more
information about the Community Service Employment for Older Americans (CSEOA) program, see CRS Report
R45626, Older Americans Act: Senior Community Service Employment Program.
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out of $2.129 billion). DOL allocates Title V funds for grants based on a statutory funding
formula to state agencies in all 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, and the U.S.
territories, and to national organizations. There is a 10% nonfederal match requirement for Title V
grant activities.
SCSEP participants are placed in part-time positions working in a variety of community service
activities, such as day care centers, senior centers, schools, and hospitals.18 Participants work
part-time and receive on-the-job experience and skills. The program operates on a program year
(PY) basis from July 1 through June 30.19 For PY2020 (ending June 30, 2021), the program is
supporting a projected 56,050 participants.20 Enrollees are paid no less than the highest of the
federal minimum wage, the state or local minimum wage, or the prevailing wage paid by the
same employer for similar public occupations. In addition to wages, enrollees receive training,
physical examinations, personal and job-related counseling, transportation for employment
purposes (under certain circumstances), and placement assistance into unsubsidized jobs.
Title VI. Grants for Services for Native Americans
Title VI authorizes funds for supportive and nutrition services to older Native Americans. Funds
are awarded directly by ACL to Indian tribal organizations, Native Alaskan organizations, and
nonprofit groups representing Native Hawaiians. To be eligible for funding, a tribal organization
must represent at least 50 Native Americans aged 60 and older. In FY2018, grants were awarded
to 270 tribal organizations representing 400 Indian tribes and villages, including one organization
serving Native Hawaiian elders.21 The program provides services such as transportation, home-
delivered and congregate nutrition services, information and referral, and a wide range of home
care services. Title VI also authorizes caregiver support services to Native American elders.
Respite, caregiver training, information and outreach, counseling, and support groups are among
the services provided. For FY2021, these programs receive $46.0 million ($35.2 million for
supportive and nutrition services, and $10.8 million for family caregivers). In addition, in
response to the COVID-19 pandemic, a total of $32 million for supportive, nutrition, and family
caregiver services was provided to tribal organizations under P.L. 116-260, Division N, and P.L.
117-2, Title II, Subtitle L.
Title VII. Vulnerable Elder Rights Protection Activities
Title VII authorizes the long-term care ombudsman program as well as Elder Abuse, Neglect, and
Exploitation Prevention Programs. For FY2021, these programs are funded at a total of $23.7
million. The majority of Title VII funding ($18.9 million, or 80%, in FY2021) is directed at the
long-term care ombudsman program, which investigates and resolves complaints of residents in
nursing facilities, board and care facilities, and other adult care homes. In addition, $10.0 million

18 U.S. Department of Labor, Senior Community Service Employment Program,
https://www.dol.gov/agencies/eta/Seniors.
19 Per OAA Section 517(b), CSEOA is forward funded; for example, dollars appropriated in FY2021 (October 1, 2020
to September 30, 2021) are used for PY2021 (July 1, 2021 to June 30, 2022).
20 There are more participants than positions in a given program year; as participants leave the program, their job slots
can be filled by new participants. Department of Labor Employment and Training Administration, FY2021
Congressional Budget Justification,
Community Service Employment for Older Americans,
https://www.dol.gov/sites/dolgov/files/general/budget/2021/CBJ-2021-V1-05.pdf.
21 U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Community Living, Fiscal Year 2021
Justification of Estimates for Appropriations Committees
, p. 87; tribal organization allocation tables are at ACL, State
and Tribal Funding Allocations
, https://acl.gov/about-acl/older-americans-act-oaa.
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in funding for the long-term care ombudsman program has been provided under the P.L. 117-2,
Title II, Subtitle L in response to the COVID-19 pandemic.22 In 2019, ombudsmen handled more
than 198,500 resident complaints and provided more than 559,000 consultations to individuals
and long-term care facilities.23
FY2021 Appropriations Overview
The following provides information on FY2021 discretionary appropriations provided in annual
HHS and DOL appropriations laws. Funding for most OAA programs is provided in annual HHS
appropriations; OAA Title V is part of annual DOL appropriations.
Annual Discretionary Appropriations
The Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2021 (P.L. 116-260), Division H, Departments of Labor,
Health and Human Services, and Education, and Related Agencies Appropriations Act, 2021,
provided discretionary appropriations for OAA programs, projects, and activities under ACL’s
Aging and Disability Services Programs budget authority and the Department of Labor budget
authority at an estimated total of $2.129 billion for FY2021, which is $29.5 million (1.4%) more
than the FY2020 level.24 Figure 2 shows the distribution of FY2021 OAA discretionary amounts
by title, with program-level detail for Title III State and Community Programs on Aging. Title III
programs received the largest proportion of OAA funding, with 73.2% of funding appropriated to
nutrition, supportive services, family caregivers, and health promotion activities. About one-fifth
of OAA funding (19.0%) is allocated to Title V, the CSEOA Program. The remaining funds are
allocated to AOA-administered activities under Titles II (2.6%) and IV (2.0%), grants to Native
Americans under Title VI (2.2%), and vulnerable elder rights protection activities under Title VII
(1.1%).
Several OAA programs saw increases in funding for FY2021 compared with FY2020-enacted
levels. Title III programs received a $5.0 million increase for congregate nutrition services, a
$10.0 million increase for home-delivered nutrition services, and an additional $3.0 million was
appropriated for the National Family Caregiver Support Program and $2.5 million for Supportive
Services and Senior Centers. Title IV programs received an additional $7.0 million, including
$4.0 million for Care Corps grants (which was not funded in the FY2020 appropriations law), a

22 In addition, P.L. 116-260, Division N, Additional Coronavirus Response and Relief, appropriated $100.0 million for
activities authorized by the Elder Justice Act to prevent, prepare for, and respond to coronavirus. ACL announced that
$93.9 million of that amount would be available for “Grants to Enhance Adult Protective Services to Respond to
COVID-19,” Federal Register, February 1, 2021, 86 FR 7726, https://www.federalregister.gov/d/2021-02091. ACL
announced that $4.0 million of that amount would be available for “Grants to Enhance Capacity of Long-Term Care
Ombudsman Programs to Respond to Complaints of Abuse and Neglect of Residents in Long-Term Care Facilities
During the COVID-19 Public Health Emergency,” Federal Register, February 1, 2021, 86 FR 7728,
https://www.federalregister.gov/d/2021-02092.
23 U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Community Living, AGing Integrated Database
(AGID), National Ombudsman Reporting System (NORS), Data at a Glance
, https://agid.acl.gov/DataGlance/NORS/.
24 Program administration funding reflects administration costs for ACL-administered programs authorized under OAA
as well as the Developmental Disabilities Assistance and Bill of Rights Act (DD Act), the Help America Vote Act
(HAVA), the Assistive Technology (AT) Act, the Rehabilitation Act, the Public Health Service Act (PHSA), the Elder
Justice Act (EJA), and Medicare Improvements for Patients and Providers Act (MIPPA). (U.S. Department of Health
and Human Services, Administration for Community Living, Fiscal Year 2021 Justification of Estimates for
Appropriations Committees
, p. 258.) In addition, the Falls Prevention Program and Alzheimer’s Disease Program, both
authorized under OAA Title IV, receive mandatory funding under the Public Health Prevention Fund (PPHF). The
Senior Medicare Patrol Program also receives mandatory HCFAC account funding. These mandatory amounts are not
reflected in the estimated OAA total.
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$2.0 million increase for Elder Justice/Adult Protective Services, and a $1.0 million increase for
the Alzheimer’s Disease Program. Title VI grants to Native Americans received an increase of
$1.0 million for supportive, nutrition, and caregiver services. The long-term care ombudsman
program under Title VII received a $1.0 million increase.
Figure 2. Older Americans Act, FY2021 Discretionary Appropriations
Funding as a percentage of total OAA funding, $2.129 billion.
Excludes additional appropriations in response to the COVID-19 pandemic

Source: Explanatory statement submitted by Rep. Lowey, Chairwoman of the House Committee on
Appropriations regarding the House Amendment to the Senate Amendment to H.R. 133, Consolidated
Appropriations Act, 2021, Congressional Record, December 21, 2020, pp. H8632, H8640, H8679-H8681,
https://www.congress.gov/116/crec/2020/12/21/CREC-2020-12-21.pdf-bk4; email communication with G. Steven
Hagy, director, ACL Office of Budget and Finance, January 7, 2021.
Note: Does not include additional appropriations for COVID-19 response. Sums may not total due to rounding.
Appropriations Related to COVID-19 Response
Compared with younger people, older adults have been at higher risk of severe illness due to
COVID-19, including hospitalization and death.25 In response to the COVID-19 pandemic,26
discretionary and mandatory additional appropriations have provided an additional $1.120 billion

25 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Risk for COVID-19 Infection, Hospitalization, and Death By Age Group,
https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/covid-data/investigations-discovery/hospitalization-death-by-age.html.
26 On March 13, 2020, the President declared that the COVID-19 pandemic was of sufficient severity and magnitude to
warrant an emergency determination under §501(b) of the Robert T. Stafford Disaster Relief and Emergency
Assistance Act (“Stafford Act”; 42 U.S.C. 5121-5207). The emergency exists nationwide. Under the declaration, states,
U.S. territories, and tribes may consider requests for a declaration of a “major disaster” under §401(a) of the Stafford
Act. A major disaster declaration under the Stafford Act triggers disaster relief authority in the OAA should a state
(including a U.S. territory) or tribe (OAA Title VI grantee) request and receive such declaration. Specifically, OAA
§310 (42 U.S.C. 3030) provides authority for states to use any portion of funding made available under any and all
sections of the act for disaster relief provided to older individuals. For further information, see ACL guidance issued
March 16, 2020 at
https://acl.gov/sites/default/files/common/OAA%20DISASTER%20RELIEF%20REIMBURSEMENTS-310%203-16-
2020.docx.
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in FY2020 funding and $1.609 billion in FY2021 funding for OAA programs and activities to
prevent, prepare for, and respond to coronavirus.27 The following summarizes legislation enacted
in FY2020 and FY2021 to provide additional appropriations as well certain policy changes to
provide additional administrative flexibilities to SUAs and AAAs. For annual additional
appropriations for COVID-19 response by OAA title and activity, see Table A-1. For OAA
additional appropriations for COVID-19 response by law and appropriation year, see Table B-1.
Families First Coronavirus Response Act
On March 18, 2020, the President signed the Families First Coronavirus Response Act (FFCRA;
P.L. 116-127), which provides a total of $250.0 million in discretionary supplemental funding for
expanded food assistance for OAA nutrition services to states, U.S. territories, and tribal
organizations. Funding is to remain available until September 30, 2021. Specifically, FFCRA
provided
 $80.0 million for congregate nutrition services to states and U.S. territories,
 $160.0 million for home-delivered nutrition services to states and U.S. territories,
and
 $10.0 million for nutrition services to Native Americans.28
FFCRA does not apply the 15% state matching requirements for OAA Title III formula grants for
supportive services and nutrition services (OAA Sections 304(d)(1)(D) and 309(b)(2)) to these
funds.
Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act
On March 27, 2020, the President signed the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security
(CARES; P.L. 116-136,) Act, which provides a total of $870.0 million in discretionary
supplemental funding to states, U.S. territories, and tribal organizations for OAA nutrition
services, supportive services, family caregiver services, ADRCs, and elder rights protection
activities. Funding is to remain available until September 30, 2021. Specifically, the CARES Act
provided
 $480.0 million for nutrition services to states and U.S. territories,
 $20.0 million for nutrition services to Native Americans,
 $200.0 million for supportive services,
 $100.0 million for family caregiver services,
 $50.0 million for ADRCs, and

27 ACL has posted COVID-19 related guidance for OAA grantees and service providers at ACL, Coronavirus disease
2019 (COVID-19)
, https://acl.gov/COVID-19#NetworksAnchor; scroll to “For the Aging and Disability Networks.” On
March 29, HHS announced a partnership between the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and ACL to
provide $93 million in grants to the aging and disability networks to assist with increasing vaccinations among older
adults and individuals with disabilities, https://www.hhs.gov/about/news/2021/03/29/hhs-to-expand-access-to-covid-
19-vaccines-for-older-adults-and-people-with-disabilities.html.
28 State and tribal organization allocation tables for the Families First Coronavirus Response Act (P.L. 116-127) and
CARES Act (P.L. 116-136) are at ACL, State and Tribal Funding Allocations, https://acl.gov/about-acl/older-
americans-act-oaa.
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 $20.0 million for elder rights protection activities, including the long-term care
ombudsman program.29
The CARES Act provides an SUA the authority to transfer up to 100% of these funds between
nutrition services programs and does not apply the 15% state matching requirements for OAA
Title III formula grants for supportive services and nutrition services to these funds.30
During any portion of the COVID-19 public health emergency declared under Section 319 of the
Public Health Service Act (PHSA), Section 3222 of the CARES Act provides an SUA or AAA,
without prior approval, the authority to transfer up to 100% between OAA nutrition programs. It
further clarifies participant requirements for home-delivered nutrition services to include those
unable to obtain nutrition due to social distancing as a result of the emergency and authorizes the
Assistant Secretary to waive certain dietary requirements for nutrition services.
In addition, Section 3223 of the CARES Act provides additional authority for the Secretary of
Labor with respect to administration and implementation of OAA Title V, CSEOA program due to
the effects of the COVID-19 public health emergency declared under PHSA Section 319, if
determined appropriate. This includes extending individual program participation beyond 48
months in the aggregate, increasing the average participation cap for eligible individuals that is
applied to grantees, and increasing the limit on administrative expenses to 20% of the grant
amount.
Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2021
On December 27, 2020, the President signed the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2021 (P.L.
116-260). Division N, Additional Coronavirus Response and Relief, provides a total of $175
million in mandatory supplemental funding for OAA nutrition services to states, U.S. territories,
and tribal organizations. Specifically, the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2021 provided
 $168.0 million for nutrition services to states and U.S. territories, and
 $7.0 million for nutrition services to tribal organizations.
Of the $168.0 million to states and U.S. territories for nutrition services, ACL allocated the entire
amount to home-delivered nutrition services.31
P.L. 116-260, Division N, Section 731, does not apply the 15% state matching requirements for
OAA Title III formula grants for supportive services and nutrition services to these funds. Section
732 further provides that of the Title III-C home-delivered and congregate nutrition services
program funds that they receive in FY2021, SUAs and AAAs may transfer up to 100% of the
funds between the two programs without prior approval.32 Similar to the CARES Act, it further
clarifies participant requirements for home-delivered nutrition services to include those unable to

29 P.L. 116-136, the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act, provided $480.0 million in
supplemental funding for OAA Title III nutrition services that ACL allocated to states and territories under their home-
delivered nutrition programs and provided $20.0 million for OAA Title VII services that ACL allocated to the long-
term care ombudsman program. State and tribal organization allocation tables for the CARES Act (P.L. 116-136) are at
ACL, State and Tribal Funding Allocations, https://acl.gov/about-acl/older-americans-act-oaafor more information see
https://acl.gov/about-acl/older-americans-act-oaa.
30 OAA Section 308(b)(4)(A) authorizes SUAs to transfer up to 40% of funds received between the congregate
nutrition and home-delivered nutrition services programs.
31 Email communication with ACL Budget Director, January 7, 2021.
32 ACL issued further guidance on OAA funding transfers under P.L. 116-260 on January 28, 2021; see
https://acl.gov/sites/default/files/common/AoA%20-%20Fiscal%20FAQs%20Supplement%205.pdf#page=3.
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obtain nutrition due to social distancing as a result of the emergency and authorizes the Assistant
Secretary to waive certain dietary requirements for nutrition services.
American Rescue Plan Act of 2021
On March 12, 2021, the President signed the American Rescue Plan Act of 2021 (ARPA; P.L.
117-2). Title II, Subtitle L provides a total of $1.434 billion in mandatory funding for OAA
programs, to remain available until expended. Specifically, ARPA provided
 $750.0 million to states and U.S. territories for nutrition services;
 $460.0 million for supportive services, to include COVID-19 vaccination
outreach (including transportation) and activities to prevent and mitigate social
isolation related to COVID-19;
 $145.0 million for family caregiver services;
 $44.0 million for disease prevention;
 $25.0 million to tribal organizations for nutrition services, supportive services,
and family caregiver services; and
 $10.0 million for the long-term care ombudsman program.
Of the $750.0 million to states for nutrition services, ACL allocated $450.0 million to home-
delivered nutrition services and $300.0 million to congregate nutrition services.33 Of the $25.0
million to tribal organizations, ACL allocated $16.7 million to supportive and nutrition services
and $8.3 million to family caregiver services.34
OAA Funding History
Overall, total annual OAA funding has increased over the 11-year period from FY2011 to
FY2021, with the largest one-year increase in funding (56.7%) for FY2020 due to the
COVID-19 pandemic (not adjusted for inflation; see Figure 3). FY2021 funding is 16.1% higher
than in FY2020, again due to COVID-19 additional funding. For FY2021, total OAA funding,
including supplemental funding to respond to the needs of seniors during the COVID-19
pandemic, is at its highest level ($3.738 billion) in the act’s 55-year history. Prior to FY2020,
total OAA funding levels had remained below the FY2010 level, when funding was at its
previously highest level of $2.328 billion (not shown) due to supplemental funding provided to
the CSEOA Program to serve low-income seniors affected by the Great Recession.
Total OAA funding declined in FY2011 through FY2013, when funding was at $1.807 billion, its
lowest level over the 11-year period. Most of the 5.5% reduction from FY2012 to FY2013 is
attributable to sequestration.35 For FY2014 through FY2016, total OAA funding increased
slightly each year from the FY2013 level.

33 Email communication with ACL Budget Director, March 15, 2021.
34 Email communication with ACL Budget Director, March 15, 2021. Of the Title III-C home-delivered and congregate
nutrition services program funds that they receive in FY2021, SUAs and AAAs may transfer up to 100% of the funds
between the two programs without prior approval, per P.L. 116-260, Division N, Section 732.
35 The Budget Control Act of 2011 (BCA; P.L. 112-25) tasked a Joint Select Committee on Deficit Reduction with
developing a deficit reduction plan for Congress and the President to enact by January 15, 2012. The failure of
Congress and the President to enact deficit reduction legislation by that date triggered an automatic spending reduction
process that included sequestration. This sequestration affected OAA programs through a 5% reduction in nonexempt
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FY2017 saw a slight funding decrease, with total OAA funding at 1.4% less than FY2016; most
of the decrease is due to a 7.9% reduction to Title V CSEOA funding in FY2017. Total OAA
funding increased by 8.0% in FY2018 and 1.0% in FY2019. Total OAA funding for FY2020,
including additional funding in response to the COVID-19 pandemic, increased by $1.165 billion,
56.7%. Total OAA funding for FY2021 increased by $518.5 million, or 16.1%, again including
COVID-19 additional funding. (Amounts in this discussion are not adjusted for inflation.) For
programs and activities funded by OAA title since FY2014, see Table A-1.
Figure 3. Total Funding for Older Americans Act Programs, FY2011-FY2021

Source: Prepared by CRS based on appropriations legislation, committee reports, explanatory statements, and
agency operating plans. Amounts are nominal dollars (not adjusted for inflation).
Notes: Includes discretionary funding in annual appropriations laws, and discretionary and mandatory funding in
additional appropriations related to COVID-19 response.


nondefense discretionary funding in FY2013. In addition, the Consolidated and Further Continuing Appropriations Act,
2013 (P.L. 113-6), which generally funded discretionary HHS and Department of Labor (DOL) programs for FY2013
at their FY2012 levels, also included an across-the-board rescission of 0.2% per Section 3004.
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Appendix A. Older Americans Act Programs:
FY2014-FY2021 Funding
Table A-1
shows the discretionary budget authority history for OAA programs for FY2014
through FY2021. It includes discretionary funding in annual appropriations laws, and additional
discretionary and mandatory funding in COVID-19 relief legislation. Amounts are not adjusted
for inflation. The table includes several nonadd lines—in italicized font with funding amounts in
parentheses—for specific programs within a larger budget account (i.e., Nutrition Services).
Amounts shown in Table A-1 also account for the following:
 Annual and supplemental appropriations for FY2020, which are shown in two
columns:
 “FY2020 Annual Approps.” Includes discretionary funding provided by P.L.
116-94, Further Consolidated Appropriations Act 2020.
 “FY2020 Supplemental Approps.” includes total discretionary funding
provided by P.L. 116-127, Families First Coronavirus Response Act and P.L.
116-136, Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act (CARES Act).
 Annual and additional appropriations for FY2021, which are shown in two
columns:
 “FY2021 Annual Approps.” includes discretionary funding provided by P.L.
116-260, Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2021, Division H, Departments of
Labor, Health and Human Services, and Education, and Related Agencies
Appropriations Act, 2021.
 “FY2021 Additional Approps.” includes mandatory funding provided by P.L.
116-260, Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2021, Division N, Additional
Coronavirus Response and Relief; and P.L. 117-2, American Rescue Plan Act
of 2021.

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Table A-1. Budget Authority for the Older Americans Act (OAA) Programs: FY2014-FY2021
($ in millions)
FY2020
FY2020
FY2021
FY2021
Annual
Supplement
Annual
Additional
OAA Programs
FY2014a
FY2015
FY2016
FY2017
FY2018
FY2019
Appropsb al Appropsc Appropsd
Appropse
Title II: Administration on
$50.007
$50.007
$51.359
$51.359
$54.360
$54.360
$54.360
$50.000
$54.360
0
Aging
Program administration
30.035f
30.035
40.063
40.063
41.063
41.063
41.063
0
41.063
0
Aging network support activities
3.661g
3.661
3.896h
3.896
3.896
3.896
3.896
0
3.896
0
Senior Medicare Patroli
8.910
8.910
0j
0j
0j
0j
0j
0
0
0
Aging and Disability Resource
6.119k
6.119
6.119
6.119
8.119
8.119
8.119
$50.000
8.119
0
Centers
Elder rights support activitiesl
1.282
1.282
1.281
1.281
1.282
1.282
1.282
0
1,282
0
Title III: Grants for State and
$1,327.815 $1,327.815 $1,352.911 $1,358.411 $1,487.261 $1,497.861 $1,537.611 $1,020.000 $1,558.111 $1,567.000
Community Programs on
Aging

Supportive services and centers
347.724
347.724
347.724
350.224
385.074
385.074
390.074
200.000
392.574
460.000
Family caregiversm
145.586
145.586
150.586
150.586
180.586
181.186
185.936
100.000
188.936
145.000
Disease prevention/health
19.848
19.848
19.848
19.848
24.848
24.848
24.848
0
24.848
44.000
promotion
Nutrition services
814.657
814.657
834.753
837.753
896.753
906.753
936.753
720.000n
951.753
918.000
Congregate meals (nonadd)
438.191
438.191
448.342
450.342
490.342
495.342
510.342
80.000n
515.342
300.000
Home-delivered meals (nonadd)
216.397
216.397
226.342
227.342
246.342
251.342
266.342
640.000n
276.342
618.000o
Nutrition services incentive grants
160.069
160.069
160.069
160.069
160.069
160.069
160.069
0
160.069
0
(nonadd)
Title IV: Activities for Health,
$6.392
$12.892
$16.658
$18.658
$31.957
$36.957
$34.957
0
$41.957
0
Independence, and Longevity
Elder rights support activities
2.592
6.592p
10.593
12.593
14.592
14.592
14.592
0
16.592
0q
Aging network support activities
3.800g
6.300r
6.065h
6.065
8.565
13.565
8.565
0
12.565
0
CRS-16

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FY2020
FY2020
FY2021
FY2021
Annual
Supplement
Annual
Additional
OAA Programs
FY2014a
FY2015
FY2016
FY2017
FY2018
FY2019
Appropsb al Appropsc Appropsd
Appropse
Alzheimer's Disease Programs




8.800
8.800
11.800
0
12.800
0
Title V: Community Service
$434.371
$434.371
$434.371 $400.000 $400.000 $400.000 $405.000
0
$405.000
0
Senior Opportunities Act
Title VI: Grants to Native
$32.189
$32.189
$38.689
$38.764
$42.764
$44.264
$45.014
$30.000
$46.014
$32.000
Americans
Supportive and nutrition services
26.158
26.158
31.158
31.208
33.208
34.208
34.708
30.000
35.208
23.670
Native American caregivers
6.031
6.031
7.531
7.556
9.556
10.056
10.306
0
10.806
8.330
Title VII: Allotments for
$20.658
$20.658
$20.658
$20.658
$21.658
$21.658
$22.658
$20.000
$23.658
$10.000
Vulnerable Elder Rights
Protection Activities

Long-term care ombudsman
15.885
15.885
15.885
15.885
16.885
16.885
17.885
$20.000t
18.885
$10.000u
program
Elder abuse prevention
4.773
4.773
4.773
4.773
4.773
4.773
4.773
t
4.773
0
TOTAL Older Americans Act
$1,871.432 $1,877.932 $1,914.646 $1,887.850 $2,038.000 $2,055.100 $2,099.600 $1,120.000 $2,129.100 $1,609.000
Programs
Source: FY2014 to FY2021 Labor-Health and Human Services (HHS)-Education Appropriations Acts and accompanying report and explanatory statement language
available at the CRS appropriations status table; P.L. 116-127; P.L. 116-136; P.L. 116-260; P.L. 117-2; various HHS, Administration on Aging (AOA), Administration for
Community Living (ACL), and Department of Labor (DOL) budget documents, including budget justifications (FY2017); email communication with G. Steven Hagy,
director, AOA/ACL Office of Budget and Finance, 2013 to 2021.
Notes: Includes discretionary funding in annual appropriations laws, and discretionary and mandatory funding in COVID-19 relief legislation.
a. FY2014 numbers reflect appropriated amounts before transfers. Per P.L. 113-76, Division H, Title II §206, the Administration had limited authority to transfer funds
among HHS accounts. Under this authority, $3.857 million was transferred out of OAA programs: $3.466 million from the Nutrition Services Incentives Program;
$233,000 from ACL Program Administration; $55,000 from Aging network support activities; $52,000 from ADRCs; $29,000 from Elder Rights Support Activities;
and $22,000 from Senior Medicare Patrol. (Email communication with G. Steven Hagy, Director, Office of Budget and Finance, ACL, April 2, 2015).
b. This column reflects FY2020 appropriations in P.L. 116-94, Further Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2020. Funding is to remain available until September 30, 2021.
c. This column reflects supplemental FY2020 appropriations in P.L. 116-127, Families First Coronavirus Response Act and P.L. 116-136, Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and
Economic Security Act (CARES Act). Funding is to remain available until September 30, 2021.
d. This column reflects discretionary funding provided by P.L. 116-260, Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2021, Division H, Departments of Labor, Health and Human
Services, and Education, and Related Agencies Appropriations Act, 2021.
CRS-17


e. This column reflects mandatory additional funding provided by P.L. 116-260, Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2021, Division N, Additional Coronavirus Response
and Relief; and P.L. 117-2, American Rescue Plan Act, 2021.
f.
Starting with FY2014, amounts reflect program administration costs for aging and disability services programs administered by ACL, not just aging services programs
administered by AOA as in prior years. Prior to FY2014, amounts reflected under program administration included AOA administration of most OAA programs and
several programs under non-OAA authorities (e.g., Public Health Service Act [PHSA] and the Medicare Improvements for Patients and Providers Act [MIPPA]).
g. Starting in FY2014, budget documents provide funds for the National Eldercare Locator (authorized under Title II) and Multigenerational Civic Engagement
(authorized under Title IV) together under a new “National Eldercare Locator and Engagement” line item. For simplicity, this table includes this funding under Title II
Aging network support activities.
h. Starting in FY2016, budget documents provide funds for the Resource Center on Women and Retirement Planning (authorized under Title IV) and the Pension
Counseling and Information Program (authorized under Title II) together under a new “Pension Counseling and Retirement Information” line item. For simplicity,
this table includes this funding under Title II Aging network support activities.
i.
In addition to discretionary funding, the Senior Medicare Patrol Program receives mandatory Health Care Fraud and Abuse Control (HCFAC) account funds under
the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS).
j.
In FY2016, the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2016 (P.L. 114-113), changed the source of discretionary funding for the Senior Medicare Patrol program from that
funded under ACL appropriations to CMS HCFAC appropriations. Subsequent annual appropriations laws have continued this practice. The FY2016 and FY2017
appropriations laws did not specify a specific amount for these activities. The FY2018 and FY2019 appropriations laws each required the HHS Secretary to provide
not less than $17.621 million from HCFAC for the Senior Medicare Patrol program. The FY2020 appropriations law requires the HHS Secretary to provide not less
than $18.000 million from HCFAC for the Senior Medicare Patrol program.
k. In addition to ADRC discretionary funding under Title II, §2405 of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA, P.L. 111-148, as amended) provided
mandatory appropriations for ADRCs of $10.0 million for each year from FY2010 to FY2014.
l.
Elder rights support activities include the National Center on Elder Abuse and the National Long-Term Care Ombudsman Resource Center (both authorized under
Title II), and Model Approaches to Statewide Legal Assistance and National Legal Assistance and Support Projects (both authorized under Title IV). Prior to FY2011,
funding for these programs was included in totals for Aging network support activities and Program Innovations.
m. Funding for Native American family caregiving is shown in Title VI.
n. P.L. 116-127, the Families First Coronavirus Response Act, provides $240.0 million in supplemental funding for OAA Title III nutrition services ($80.0 million for
congregate nutrition and $160.0 million for home-delivered nutrition). P.L. 116-136, the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act, provides
$480.0 million in supplemental funding for OAA Title III nutrition services that ACL allocated to states and territories under their home-delivered nutrition
programs.
o. P.L. 116-260, Division N, and P.L. 117-2 provided mandatory supplemental funding to OAA nutrition services under Title III-C. For P.L. 116-260, ACL allocated the
entire Title III-C nutrition services amount ($168.0 million) to home-delivered nutrition services. For P.L. 117-2, ACL allocated $300.0 million to congregate
nutrition and $450.0 to home-delivered nutrition. However, of the Title III-C home-delivered and congregate nutrition services program funds received in FY2021,
SUAs and AAAs may transfer up to 100% of the funds between the two programs without prior approval, per P.L. 116-260, Division N, Section 732 (email
communication with ACL Budget Director, January 7, 2021 and March 15, 2021; P.L. 116-260, Division N, Sec. 732).
p. Starting in FY2015, elder rights support activities also include Elder Justice/Adult Protective Services (APS) funding. For simplicity, this table counts funding for Elder
Justice/APS under Title IV elder rights support activities; however, these funds may also be used for activities authorized under OAA Section 751 and the Elder
Justice Act (§2042(a) of the Social Security Act).
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q. P.L. 116-260, Division N, appropriated $100.0 million for activities authorized by the Elder Justice Act, to prevent, prepare for, and respond to coronavirus. ACL
announced that $93.9 million of that amount would be available for “Grants to Enhance Adult Protective Services to Respond to COVID-19,” Federal Register,
February 1, 2021, 86 FR 7726, https://www.federalregister.gov/d/2021-02091.
r. Starting in FY2015, Title IV Aging network support activities also includes Holocaust Survivors Assistance.
s. The Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2018 (P.L. 115-141), streamlined ACL’s four Alzheimer’s disease programs (Alzheimer’s Disease Supportive Services,
Alzheimer’s Disease Initiative—Specialized Supportive Services, Alzheimer’s Disease Initiative—Communications, and the National Alzheimer’s Call Center
previously funded under Aging Network Support Activities) into a single Alzheimer’s Disease Program. For each of FY2018 through FY2021, in addition to
discretionary funds, the Alzheimer’s Disease Program also received $14.7 million in mandatory funds from the Prevention and Public Health Fund (PPHF).
t.
P.L. 116-136, the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act (CARES Act), provides $20.0 million for OAA Title VII services that ACL allocated to the
long-term care ombudsman program.
u. In addition, P.L. 116-260, Division N, appropriated $100.0 million for activities authorized by the Elder Justice Act to prevent, prepare for, and respond to
coronavirus. ACL announced that $4.0 million of that amount would be available for “Grants to Enhance Capacity of Long-Term Care Ombudsman Programs to
Respond to Complaints of Abuse and Neglect of Residents in Long-Term Care Facilities During the COVID-19 Public Health Emergency,” Federal Register, February
1, 2021, 86 FR 7728, https://www.federalregister.gov/d/2021-02092.

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Older Americans Act: Overview and Funding

Appendix B. COVID-19 Response Funding for
Older Americans Act Programs
Table B-1
shows discretionary and mandatory funding for OAA programs under the following
laws that were enacted in response to the COVID-19 pandemic:
 P.L. 116-127, Families First Coronavirus Response Act (FFCRA), which
became law March 18, 2020. This law provided discretionary funding for
OAA nutrition services programs, to be made available until September 30,
2021.
 P.L. 116-136, Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act (CARES
Act), which became law March 27, 2020. This law provided discretionary
funding for certain OAA programs, to be made available until September 30,
2021.
 P.L. 116-260, Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2021, Division N, Additional
Coronavirus Response and Relief, which became law December 27, 2020.
This law provided mandatory funding for OAA nutrition services programs
(no funding deadline or expiration date is specified in the law).
 P.L. 117-2, American Rescue Plan Act (ARPA), which became law March 11,
2021. This law provided mandatory funding for certain OAA programs, to be
made available until expended.

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link to page 25 link to page 25 link to page 25 link to page 25 link to page 25 link to page 25
Table B-1. COVID-19 Additional Funding for Older Americans Act Programs, FY2020-FY2021
($ in millions)

FY2020 laws
FY2021 laws

Total FY2020
P.L. 117-2,
Total FY2021
COVID
P.L. 116-
American
COVID
Total COVID
P.L. 116-127,
P.L. 116-136,
Supplemental
260, Division
Rescue Plan
Additional
Additional
OAA Programs
FFCRA
CARES Act
s
N
Act
Funding
Funding
Title II: Administration on
Aging

0
$50.000
$50.000
0
0
0
$50.000
Aging and Disability Resource
Centers
0
$50.000
$50.000
0
0
0
$50.000
Title III: Grants for State and
Community Programs on
Aging

$240.000
$780.000
$1,020.000
$168.000
$1,399.000
$1,567.000
$2,587.000
Supportive services and centers
0
$200.000
$200.000
0
$460.000
$460.000
$660.000
Family caregivers
0
$100.000
$100.000
0
$145.000
$145.000
$245.000
Disease prevention/health
promotion
0
0
0
0
$44.000
$44.000
$44.000
Nutrition services
$240.000
$480.000
$720.000
$168.000
$750.000
$918.000
$1,638.000
Congregate meals (nonadd)
$80.000
0
$80.000
0
$300.000a
$300.000
$380.000
Home-delivered meals (nonadd)
$160.000
$480.000b
$640.000
$168.000c
$450.000a
$618.000
$1,258.000
Title VI: Grants for Native
Americans

$10.000
$20.000
$30.000
$7.000
$25.000
$32.000
$62.000
Supportive and nutrition services
$10.000
$20.000
$30.000
$7.000
$16.670
$23.670
$53.670
Native American family caregivers
0
0
0
0
$8.330
$8.330
$8.330
Title VII: Vulnerable Elder
Rights Protection Activities

0
$20.000
$20.000
0
$10.000
$10.000
$30.000
Long-term care ombudsman
program
0
$20.000d
$20.000
0e
$10.000
$10.000
$10.000
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FY2020 laws
FY2021 laws

Total FY2020
P.L. 117-2,
Total FY2021
COVID
P.L. 116-
American
COVID
Total COVID
P.L. 116-127,
P.L. 116-136,
Supplemental
260, Division
Rescue Plan
Additional
Additional
OAA Programs
FFCRA
CARES Act
s
N
Act
Funding
Funding
Total Older Americans Act
Programs

$250.000
$870.000
$1,120.000
$175.000
$1,434.000
$1,609.000
$2,729.000
Source: Statutory language and email communication with ACL Budget Director, March 25, 2020, January 7, 2021, and March 15, 2021
a. The American Rescue Plan Act of 2021 (APRA; P.L. 117-2) provided $750.0 million in mandatory additional funding to OAA nutrition services under Title III-C. ACL
allocated $300.0 million to congregate nutrition and $450.0 to home-delivered nutrition services programs. However, SUAs and AAAs may transfer up to 100% of
the funds received in FY2021 between the two programs without prior approval, per P.L. 116-260, Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2021, Division N, Section 732
(email communication with ACL Budget Director, March 15, 2021).
b. The Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act (CARES Act; P.L. 116-136) provided $480.0 million for OAA nutrition programs under Title III-C, which
includes both home-delivered meals and congregate meals programs. ACL allocated the entire amount to the home-delivered meals program, but states were
allowed to transfer as much as 100% of the funds they received to the congregate meals program. ACL, ACL State by State Total for CARES Act Funding, April 1, 2020,
https://acl.gov/sites/default/files/about-acl/2020-
04/ACL%20State%20by%20State%20Tribe%20and%20CIL%20CARES%20Supplemental%20Awards%20Tables%2004.21.20.pdf.
c. The Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2021, P.L. 116-260, Division N, provided $168.0 million to OAA nutrition services under Title III-C. ACL allocated the entire
amount to home-delivered nutrition services. However, SUAs and AAAs may transfer up to 100% of the funds received in FY2021 between the two programs
without prior approval, per Division N, Section 732 (email communication with ACL Budget Director, January 7, 2021).
d. The CARES Act (P.L. 116-136) provided $20.0 million “for elder rights protection activities, including the long-term ombudsman program.” ACL allocated the entire
amount to the long-term care ombudsman program. ACL, ACL State by State Total for CARES Act Funding, April 1, 2020, https://acl.gov/sites/default/files/about-
acl/2020-04/ACL%20State%20by%20State%20Tribe%20and%20CIL%20CARES%20Supplemental%20Awards%20Tables%2004.21.20.pdf.
e. In addition to OAA funding, the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2021 (P.L. 116-260), Division N, appropriated $100.0 million for activities authorized by the Elder
Justice Act to prevent, prepare for, and respond to coronavirus. ACL announced that $4.0 million of that amount would be available for “Grants to Enhance
Capacity of Long-Term Care Ombudsman Programs to Respond to Complaints of Abuse and Neglect of Residents in Long-Term Care Facilities During the COVID-
19 Public Health Emergency,” Federal Register, February 1, 2021, 86 FR 7728, https://www.federalregister.gov/d/2021-02092.

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link to page 26 link to page 26 link to page 26 Older Americans Act: Overview and Funding

Appendix C. Authorizations of Appropriations for
Older Americans Act (OAA) Programs
Table C-1
provides authorizations of appropriations under the Older Americans Act, as amended
by P.L. 116-131. Authorizations of appropriations are shown by OAA title and program or activity
(Titles II through VII). No authorizations of appropriations are under Title I of the act.
Authorizations of appropriations for each fiscal year (FY2020 through FY2024) have been
summed to show a total amount for each year (bottom of Table C-1). However, this total amount
includes only those OAA authorizations of appropriations with a discrete amount specified in
statute, which applies to almost all authorizations of appropriations. The one exception is under
OAA Title VII, Subtitle B, Native American Organization and Elder Justice Provisions. OAA
Section 751 authorizes to be appropriated “such sums as may be necessary” for Native American
elder rights program and grants for state elder justice systems. Table C-1 shows the
authorizations of appropriations by OAA title and program or activity (first column). The second
column describes any amendments or changes to statutory language under P.L. 116-131. The last
five columns show the authorizations of appropriations amounts for each program or activity for
FY2020 through FY2024, with a total amount summed below for each fiscal year.

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Table C-1. Authorizations of Appropriations for Older Americans Act as Amended by the Supporting Older Americans Act
of 2020 (P.L. 116-131)


Authorizations of Appropriations

OAA Statutory Reference
FY2020
FY2021
FY2022
FY2023
FY2024
Title II, Administration on Aging (AOA)
Administration, Salaries, and
§216(a) authorizes to be appropriated for
$43,937,410
$46,573,655
$49,368,074
$52,330,158
$55,469,968
Expenses of AOA
administration, salaries, and expenses of
the Administration
Eldercare Locator
§216(b)(1) authorizes to be appropriated
$2,180,660
$2,311,500
$2,450,190
$2,597,201
$2,753,033
to carry out §202(a)(21), relating to the
National Eldercare Locator Service
Pension Counseling and
§216(b)(2), relating to Pension Counseling
$1,988,060
$2,107,344
$2,233,784
$2,367,811
$2,509,880
Information Program
and Information Programs, authorizes to
be appropriated
Elder Rights Support Activities
§216(b)(3) authorizes to be appropriated
$1,371,740
$1,454,044
$1,541,287
$1,633,764
$1,731,790
(Title II)
to carry out §202 relating to Elder Rights
Support Activities under this title
Aging and Disability Resource
§216(b)(4) authorizes to be appropriated
$8,687,330
$9,208,570
$9,761,084
$10,346,749
$10,967,554
Centers
to carry out §202(b) relating to the Aging
and Disability Resource Centers
Title III, State and Community Programs on Aging


Supportive Services and Centers
§303(a) authorizes to be appropriated to
$412,029,180
$436,750,931
$462,955,987
$490,733,346
$520,177,347
carry out Part B
Congregate Nutrition Services
§303(b)(1) authorizes to be appropriated
$530,015,940
$561,816,896
$595,525,910
$631,257,465
$669,132,913
to carry out Subpart 1 of Part C
Home-Delivered Nutrition
§303(b)(2) authorizes to be appropriated
$268,935,940
$285,072,096
$302,176,422
$320,307,008
$339,525,428
Services
to carry out Subpart 2 of Part C
Disease Prevention and Health
§303(d) authorizes to be appropriated to
$26,587,360
$28,182,602
$29,873,558
$31,665,971
$33,565,929
Promotion
carry out Part D
CRS-24




Authorizations of Appropriations

OAA Statutory Reference
FY2020
FY2021
FY2022
FY2023
FY2024
Family Caregiver Support
§303(e) authorizes to be appropriated to
$193,869,020
$205,501,161
$217,831,231
$230,901,105
$244,755,171
carry out Part E
Nutrition Services Incentive
§311(e) authorizes to be appropriated
$171,273,830
$181,550,260
$192,443,275
$203,989,872
$216,229,264
Program
Title IV, Activities for Health, Independence, and Longevity


Aging Network Support
§411(b)(1) authorizes to be appropriated
$14,514,550
$15,385,423
$16,308,548
$17,287,061
$18,324,285
Activities
to carry out aging network support
activities under this section
Elder Rights Support Activities
§411(b)(2) authorizes to be appropriated
$15,613,440
$16,550,246
$17,543,261
$18,595,857
$19,711,608
(Title IV)
to carry out elder rights support activities
under this section
Title V, Community Service Senior Opportunities Act


Community Service Employment
§517(a) authorizes to be appropriated for
$428,000,000
$453,680,000
$480,900,800
$509,754,848
$540,340,139
for Older Americans
Title V
Title VI, Grants for Native Americans


Indian and Native Hawaiian
§643(1) authorizes to be appropriated for
$37,102,560
$39,298,714
$41,626,636
$44,094,235
$46,709,889
Programs
Parts A and B
Native American Caregiver
§643(2) authorizes to be appropriated for
$10,759,920
$11,405,515
$12,089,846
$12,815,237
$13,584,151
Support Program
Part C
Title VII, Vulnerable Elder Rights Protection Activities


Subtitle A—State Programs


Long-Term Care Ombudsman
§702(a) to authorize to be appropriated
$18,066,950
$19,150,967
$20,300,025
$21,518,027
$22,809,108
Program (Chapter 2)
to carry out Chapter 2
Elder Abuse, Neglect, and
§702(b) to authorize to be appropriated
$5,107,110
$5,413,537
$5,738,349
$6,082,650
$6,447,609
Exploitation Prevention Program
to carry out Chapters 3 and 4
(Chapter 3) and State Legal
Assistance Development
Program (Chapter 4)
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link to page 29


Authorizations of Appropriations

OAA Statutory Reference
FY2020
FY2021
FY2022
FY2023
FY2024
Subtitle B—Native American Organization and Elder Justice Provisions


Native American Elder Rights
§751(d) authorizes to be appropriated
SSAN
SSAN
SSAN
SSAN
SSAN
Program and Grants for State
such sums as may be necessary (SSAN)
Elder Justice Systems
for FY2007 and subsequent fiscal years
Total Authorization of Appropriationsa
$2,190,041,000
$2,321,413,461
$2,460,668,267
$2,608,278,365
$2,764,745,066
Source: The Older Americans Act, as amended by the Supporting Older Americans Act of 2020, P.L. 116-131.
a. The “Total Authorization of Appropriations” do not include an amount for OAA §751(d) under Subtitle B, Native American Organizations and Elder Justice
Provisions.

CRS-26

Older Americans Act: Overview and Funding






Author Information

Kirsten J. Colello
Angela Napili
Specialist in Health and Aging Policy
Senior Research Librarian



Key Policy Staff
Area of Expertise
Name
Older Americans Act (General)
Kirsten J. Colello
OAA Title V, Community Service Employment for Older
Benjamin Collins
Americans (CSEOA) or Senior Community Service
Employment Program (SCSEP)
Family Caregiving (General); OAA Title III-Part E, National
Jared S. Sussman
Family Caregiver Support Program (NFCSP)


Disclaimer
This document was prepared by the Congressional Research Service (CRS). CRS serves as nonpartisan
shared staff to congressional committees and Members of Congress. It operates solely at the behest of and
under the direction of Congress. Information in a CRS Report should not be relied upon for purposes other
than public understanding of information that has been provided by CRS to Members of Congress in
connection with CRS’s institutional role. CRS Reports, as a work of the United States Government, are not
subject to copyright protection in the United States. Any CRS Report may be reproduced and distributed in
its entirety without permission from CRS. However, as a CRS Report may include copyrighted images or
material from a third party, you may need to obtain the permission of the copyright holder if you wish to
copy or otherwise use copyrighted material.

Congressional Research Service
R43414 · VERSION 29 · UPDATED
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