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Use of the Capitol Rotunda, Capitol Grounds, and Emancipation Hall: Concurrent Resolutions, 101st to 115th Congress

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Order Code RL34619. Use of the Capitol Rotunda and Capitol Grounds: Concurrent , Capitol Grounds, and Emancipation Hall: Concurrent Resolutions, 101st to 110th Congress August 14, 2008 Matthew E. Glassman and Jacob R. Straus Analysts on the Congress Government and Finance Division Use of the Capitol Rotunda and Capitol Grounds: Concurrent Resolutions, 101st to 110th Congress 111th Congress Matthew Eric Glassman Analyst on the Congress Jacob R. Straus Analyst on the Congress March 5, 2009 Congressional Research Service 7-5700 www.crs.gov RL34619 CRS Report for Congress Prepared for Members and Committees of Congress c11173008 . Use of the Capitol Rotunda, Capitol Grounds, and Emancipation Hall Summary The Capitol Rotunda and the Capitol Grounds have been used as the setting for a variety of events, ranging from memorial ceremonies and the reception of foreign dignitaries to the presentation of awards and the hosting of public competitions. This report identifies and categorizes uses of the Capitol Rotunda and Capitol Grounds authorized by concurrent resolutions since the 101st Congress. In most cases, use of the Capitol Rotunda requires a concurrent resolution agreed to by both the House and Senate. A concurrent resolution for the use of the Rotunda will typically identify the event and date for which use is authorized. Often, the resolution will also direct physical preparations to be carried out under the supervision of the Architect of the Capitol. supervision of the Architect of the Capitol. Sixty-seven concurrent resolutions were agreed to by the House and the Senate authorizing the use of the Rotunda between the 101st and 111th Congresses. These resolutions can be divided into seven categories: (1) commemoration ceremonies; (2) congressional gold medal ceremonies; (3) artwork unveilings; (4) presidential inauguration activities; (5) receptions or ceremonies honoring living people; (6) persons lying in state or honor; and (7) prayer vigils. Use of the Capitol Grounds can be authorized either by the passage of a concurrent resolution or through an application process with the Capitol Police. A concurrent resolution is typically needed for events longer than 24 hours in duration, for events that require vehicles on the Capitol Grounds for setup, for events requiring electronics on the Lower West Terrace of the Capitol, and for events where a large number of membersMembers will be in attendance. All other events can apply for permits and approval through the Capitol Police’s special events office. Sixty-sevenSeventy-eight concurrent resolutions were agreed to by the House and the Senate authorizing the use of the RotundaCapitol Grounds between the 101st and 110th111th Congresses. These resolutions can be divided into seven categories: (1) commemoration ceremonies; (2) congressional gold medal ceremonies; (3) artwork unveilings; (4) presidential inauguration activities; (5) receptions or ceremonies honoring living people; (6) persons lying in state or honor; and (7) prayer vigils. Seventy-eight concurrent resolutions were agreed to by the House and the Senate authorizing the use of the Capitol Grounds between the 101st and 110th Congresses. These resolutions can be divided into four categories: (1) events sponsored by nonfederal government groups; (2) memorial services; (3) events sponsored by the federal government; and (4) award and dedication ceremonies. This report will be updated at the beginning of each Congress. Contents Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Concurrent Resolutions for Use of the Rotunda . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Methodology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Results . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Commemoration Ceremonies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Congressional Gold Medal Ceremonies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Artwork Unveilings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Presidential Inaugural Activities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Receiving or Honoring Living Persons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Persons Lying in State or Honor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Prayer Vigils . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Concurrent Resolutions for Use of the Capitol Grounds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Methodology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Results . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Nonfederal Government Sponsored Events . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Memorial Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Federal Government Sponsored Events . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Award and Dedication Ceremonies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Appendix A. Concurrent Resolutions Adopted for the Use of the Capitol Rotunda, 101st to 110th Congress . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Appendix B. Concurrent Resolutions Adopted for the Use of the Capitol Grounds, 101st to 110th Congress . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 List of Tables Table 1. Concurrent Resolutions Agreed to for Use of the Rotunda, 101st to 110th Congress . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Table 2. Concurrent Resolutions Agreed to for Use of the Rotunda, 101st to 110th Congress, by Category . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Table 3. Concurrent Resolutions Agreed to for Use of the Capitol Grounds, 101st to 110th Congress . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Table 4. Concurrent Resolutions Agreed to for Use of the Capitol Grounds, 101st to 110th Congress, by Category . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Use of the Capitol Rotunda and Capitol Grounds: Concurrent Resolutions, 101st to 110th Congress Introduction Both the Capitol Rotunda and the Capitol Grounds have been used as the setting for a variety of events, ranging from memorial ceremonies and the reception of foreign dignitaries to the presentation of awards and the hosting of public competitions. This report identifies and categorizes uses of the Capitol Rotunda and Capitol Grounds authorized by concurrent resolutions since the 101st Congress. In most cases, use of the Capitol Rotunda requires a concurrent resolution agreed to by both the House and Senate.1 A concurrent resolution for the use of the Rotunda typically identifies the event and date for which use is authorized. Often, the resolution also directs physical preparations to be carried out “in accordance with such conditions as the Architect of the Capitol may provide.”2 Use of the Capitol Grounds requires either the passage of a concurrent resolution or permit approval from the Capitol Police. Events that entail the use of the West Front Steps of the Capitol, electricity on the Lower West Terrace of the Capitol, require more than 24 hours from setup to cleanup, require vehicles on Capitol Grounds for setup, or will have a large number of Members in attendance typically require a concurrent resolution.3 All other events can typically be issued permits by the U.S. Capitol Police.4 1 Congressional leaders have authorized the use of the Rotunda without a concurrent resolution for the lying in state of an official when Congress was out of session. For example, use of the Rotunda for the lying in state of President Ford in January 2007 was authorized by the Speaker of the House and the Majority Leader of the Senate. Telephone conversation between the authors and Becky F. Dougherty, protocol officer of the United States Senate, Office of the Sergeant at Arms and Doorkeeper of the Senate, July 24, 2008. 2 For example, see H.Con.Res. 377, 110th Congress. 3 Telephone conversation between the authors and Lt. Kathryn Stillman, special events, U.S. Capitol Police, July 16, 2008. 4 The U.S. Capitol Police application for conducting an event on Capitol Grounds can be found on the Capitol Police website [http://www.uscapitolpolice.gov/special_events.php], accessed July 31, 2008. The application, available at [http://www.uscapitolpolice.gov/ special_events/uscplib_297482_v1_cp_40_ guidelines_page.pdf], must be submitted at least 120 hours, or five days, in advance of the activity. CRS-2 Concurrent Resolutions for Use of the Rotunda Methodology. A database search was conducted using the Legislative Information System (LIS) for the 101st through 110th Congresses (1989-2009). The search was conducted by running a query across all agreed-to concurrent resolutions using the subject term “Rotunda.” The results of the search were then examined individually to differentiate resolutions for the use of the Rotunda from spurious references to it in otherwise unrelated legislation.5 Results. The search identified a total of 67 concurrent resolutions that were agreed to by the House and Senate. Between the 101st Congress and the 110th Congress, the House and Senate agreed to between 1 and 10 concurrent resolutions per Congress that authorized the use of the Rotunda. Table 1 reports the total number of resolutions agreed to in each Congress. Table 1. Concurrent Resolutions Agreed to for Use of the Rotunda, 101st to 110th Congress Congress Number Congress Number 101 (1989-1991) 7 106 (1999-2001) 8 102 (1991-1993) 4 107 (2001-2003) 8 103 (1993-1995) 1 108 (2003-2005) 7 104 (1995-1997) 6 109 (2005-2007) 8 105 (1997-1999) 8 110 (2007-2009) 10 st Source: Database query of Congressional Legislative Information System (LIS), 101 -110th Congress Appendix A, which lists the results of the database search, provides the following information for each concurrent resolution: the Congress in which the resolution was introduced, the resolution number, and the subject of the resolution. Concurrent resolutions authorizing the use of the Rotunda can be divided into seven categories: (1) commemoration ceremonies; (2) congressional gold medal ceremonies; (3) artwork unveilings; (4) presidential inauguration activities; (5) receptions or ceremonies honoring living people; (6) persons lying in state or honor; and (7) prayer vigils. The following sections provide a brief explanation of each category and examples of activities. Table 2 contains the number of concurrent resolutions agreed to by the Congress since 1989, by category. Commemoration Ceremonies. The largest percentage of concurrent resolutions agreed to (35.8%) for the use of the Rotunda during the 101st to 110th Congress were for ceremonies commemorating historical events. For example, concurrent resolutions authorizing the use of the Rotunda for a ceremony as part of 5 Each piece of legislation identified by the search was examined to determine (1) whether the legislation authorized the use of the Rotunda, and (2) the purpose for which the use was authorized. CRS-3 the commemoration of the days of remembrance of victims of the Holocaust were passed during each Congress.6 In recent Congresses, resolutions were also agreed to for Rotunda ceremonies to commemorate the 60th anniversary of the integration of the United States Armed Forces7 and the 200th birthday of Constantino Brumidi.8 Congressional Gold Medal Ceremonies. Ceremonies to award Congressional gold medals account for 23.9% of the concurrent resolutions for the use of the Rotunda agreed to since the 101st Congress. These award ceremonies include presentations of Congressional Gold Medals to Rosa Parks, cartoonist Charles M. Schultz, the Tuskegee Airmen, and other recipients.9 Artwork Unveilings. Since the 101st Congress, 16.4% of concurrent resolutions have been agreed to for the use of the Rotunda for ceremonies to unveil artwork. These have included unveiling ceremonies for portrait busts of former Vice Presidents,10 as well as presentation ceremonies of statutes prior to placement in Statuary Hall.11 Presidential Inaugural Activities. In preparation for the quadrennial Presidential inauguration activities that take place at the Capitol, concurrent resolutions were passed during the 102nd, 104th, 106th, 108th, and 110th Congresses.12 These resolutions have authorized the Joint Congressional Committee on Inaugural Ceremonies to use the Rotunda “in connection with the proceedings and ceremonies conducted for the inauguration of the President-elect and the Vice President-elect of the United States.”13 Receiving or Honoring Living Persons. Since the 101st Congress, 7.5% of concurrent resolutions have authorized the use of the Rotunda for the purposes of receiving foreign dignitaries or honoring a living person. For example, during the 102nd Congress, use of the Rotunda was authorized for a ceremony and reception for 6 For example, see H.Con.Res. 66, 110th Congress. 7 H.Con.Res. 377, 110th Congress. 8 H.Con.Res. 202, 109th Congress. Constantino Brumidi was an artist who painted the “apotheosis of Washington” in the dome of the Capitol as well as frescoes and murals on in the first floor hallways on the Senate wing of the Capitol Building. For more information on Constantino Brumidi see U.S. Congress, Architect of the Capitol, Constantino Brumidi: Artist of the Capitol (Washington: GPO, 1998). 9 For a complete list of Congressional Gold Medals awarded, see CRS Report RL30076, Congressional Gold Medals, 1776-2008, by Stephen Stathis. 10 For example, S.Con.Res. 63, 108th Congress, authorized the use of the Rotunda for an unveiling ceremony of a portrait bust of former Vice-President Quayle. 11 For example, H.Con.Res. 242, 109th Congress, authorized the use of the Rotunda for a presentation ceremony of a statute of Po’Pay, prior to placement in Statuary Hall. 12 For example, see S.Con.Res. 68, 110th Congress. 13 Ibid. CRS-4 the Dalai Lama.14 During the 105th Congress, use of the Rotunda was authorized for a ceremony honoring Mother Teresa.15 Persons Lying in State or Honor. Use of the Rotunda for individuals to lie in state or honor comprised 6% of Rotunda events authorized by concurrent resolution. These events have included President Reagan16 and Senator Claude Pepper17 lying in state, Rosa Parks lying in honor,18 and the memorial service for Detective John Michael Gibson and Private First Class Jacob Joseph Chestnut of the United States Capitol Police.19 Prayer Vigils. On two occasions during the 107th Congress (3% of concurrent resolutions), concurrent resolutions were agreed to for the use of the Rotunda for prayer vigils. H.Con.Res. 233 authorized the use of the Rotunda for a prayer vigil in memory of those who lost their lives on September 11, 2001. S.Con.Res. 83 authorized the use of the Rotunda for a ceremony as part of a National Day of Reconciliation. Table 2. Concurrent Resolutions Agreed to for Use of the Rotunda, 101st to 110th Congress, by Category Category Number Percentage of Total Commemoration Ceremonies 24 35.8 Congressional Gold Medal Ceremonies 16 23.9 Artwork Unveilings 11 16.4 Presidential Inaugural Activities 5 7.5 Receiving or Honoring Living People 5 7.5 Persons Lying in State or Honor 4 6.0 Prayer Vigils 2 3.0 Total 67 100 Source: Database query of Congressional Legislative Information System (LIS), 101st-110th Congress Concurrent Resolutions for Use of the Capitol Grounds Methodology. A database search was conducted using the Legislative Information System (LIS) for the 101st through 110th Congresses (1989-2009). The 14 H.Con.Res. 115, 102nd Congress. 15 S.Con.Res. 26, 105th Congress. 16 H.Con.Res. 444, 108th Congress; S.Con.Res. 115, 108th Congress. 17 H.Con.Res. 139, 101st Congress. 18 S.Con.Res. 61, 109th Congress. 19 H.Con.Res. 206, 105th Congress. CRS-5 search was conducted by running a query using the subject term “Capitol Grounds.” The results of the search were then examined individually to differentiate resolutions for the use of the Capitol Grounds from spurious references to it in otherwise unrelated legislation.20 The uses of the Capitol Grounds identified here are restricted to those authorized by concurrent resolution of the House and Senate. Results. The search identified a total 77 concurrent resolutions that were agreed to by the House and Senate. Between the 101st Congress and the 110th Congress, the House and Senate agreed to between 4 and 14 concurrent resolutions per Congress that authorized the use of the Capitol Grounds. Table 3 reports the total number of resolutions agreed to in each Congress. Table 3. Concurrent Resolutions Agreed to for Use of the Capitol Grounds, 101st to 110th Congress Congress Number Congress Number 101 (1989-1991) 4 106 (1999-2001) 14 102 (1991-1993) 6 107 (2001-2003) 9 103 (1993-1995) 7 108 (2003-2005) 7 104 (1995-1997) 6 109 (2005-2007) 7 105 (1997-1999) 9 110 (2007-2009) 8 st Source: Database query of Congressional Legislative Information System (LIS), 101 -110th Congress Appendix B, which lists the results of the database search, provides the following information for each concurrent resolution: the Congress in which the resolution was introduced, the resolution number, and the subject of the resolution. Concurrent resolutions authorizing the use of the Capitol Grounds can be divided into one of four categories: (1) events sponsored by nonfederal government groups; (2) memorial services; (3) events sponsored by the federal government; and (4) award and dedication ceremonies. The following sections provide a brief explanation of each category with examples of the types of activities concurrent resolutions provided for on the Capitol Grounds. Table 4 contains the number of concurrent resolutions agreed to by the Congress since 1989 by category. Nonfederal Government Sponsored Events. The largest percentage of concurrent resolutions agreed to (64.9%) in any given Congress are for events that are sponsored by nonfederal government entities. For example, concurrent resolutions authorizing the use of the Capitol Grounds for the Greater Washington 20 Each piece of legislation identified by the search was examined to determine whether (1) the legislation authorized the use of the Capitol Grounds, and (2) the purpose for which the use was authorized. CRS-6 Soap Box Derby21 and the District of Columbia Special Olympics Law Enforcement Torch Relay22 are typically agreed to each Congress. Memorial Services. Memorial services held on the Capitol Grounds account for 19.5% of the concurrent resolutions passed since the 101st Congress. Each year since 1989, the House and Senate have agreed to a concurrent resolution allowing the National Peace Officer’s Memorial Service to be conducted on Capitol Grounds.23 The ceremony honors law enforcement officers who gave their lives in the line of duty during the previous year.24 Federal Government Sponsored Events. Events sponsored by the federal government compose 11.7% of events on the Capitol Grounds authorized by concurrent resolution. These events have included authorizing the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts to hold performances on the East Front of the Capitol,25 allowing the National Book Festival to run programs on Capitol Grounds,26 and authorizing a celebration for the Library of Congress’s 200th birthday.27 Award and Dedication Ceremonies. Award and dedication ceremonies account for 3.9% of events authorized by concurrent resolution for the Capitol Grounds. Since 1989, three award and dedication ceremonies have been authorized through concurrent resolution. In the 106th Congress (1999-2001), Congress authorized the use of the Capitol Grounds for the dedication of the JapaneseAmerican Memorial to Patriotism;28 in the 108th Congress (2003-2005), the dedication ceremony for the National World War II Memorial was authorized for the Capitol Grounds;29 and in the 110th Congress (2007-2009), the presentation ceremony for the Congressional Gold Medal awarded to Tenzin Gyatso, the Fourteenth Dalai Lama, took place on Capitol Grounds.30 21 For example, see H.Con.Res. 311, 110th Congress. 22 For example, see H.Con.Res. 309, 110th Congress. 23 For example, see H.Con.Res. 308, 110th Congress. 24 U.S. Congress, United States Capitol Police, “27th Annual National Peace Officers Memorial Service,” press release, May 13, 2008 [http://www.uscapitolpolice.gov/ pressreleases/2008/pr_05-13-08.php], accessed July 31, 2008. 25 For example, see H.Con.Res. 76, 107th Congress. 26 For example, see H.Con.Res. 348, 107th Congress. 27 For example, see H.Con.Res. 146, 106th Congress. 28 S.Con.Res. 139, 106th Congress. 29 H.Con.Res. 423, 108th Congress. 30 H.Con.Res. 196, 110th Congress. CRS-7 Table 4. Concurrent Resolutions Agreed to for Use of the Capitol Grounds, 101st to 110th Congress, by Category Category Number Percentage of Total Nonfederal Government Sponsored Event 50 64.9 Memorial Services 15 19.5 Federal Government Sponsored Events 9 11.7 Award and Dedication Ceremonies 3 3.9 Total 77 100 Source: Database query of Congressional Legislative Information System (LIS), 101st-110th Congress CRS-8 Appendix A. Concurrent Resolutions Adopted for the Use of the Capitol Rotunda, 101st to 110thfour categories: (1) events sponsored by nonfederal government groups; (2) memorial services; (3) events sponsored by the federal government; and (4) award and dedication ceremonies. Upon the completion and opening of the Capitol Visitor Center (CVC) during the 110th Congress, Emancipation Hall of the CVC became available for use in the same manner as the Rotunda and Capitol Grounds. Use of Emancipation Hall requires the passage of a resolution agreed to by both houses of Congress authorizing its use. During the 110th Congress, one current resolution was passed authorizing the use of Emancipation Hall. To date, in the 111th Congress, no resolution authorizing the use of Emancipation Hall have been agreed to. This report will be updated at the end of each session of Congress. Congressional Research Service . Use of the Capitol Rotunda, Capitol Grounds, and Emancipation Hall Contents Introduction ................................................................................................................................1 Concurrent Resolutions for Use of the Rotunda ...........................................................................1 Methodology.........................................................................................................................1 Results ..................................................................................................................................2 Commemoration Ceremonies ..........................................................................................2 Congressional Gold Medal Ceremonies...........................................................................3 Artwork Unveilings ........................................................................................................3 Presidential Inaugural Activities ......................................................................................3 Receiving or Honoring Living Persons ............................................................................3 Persons Lying in State or Honor ......................................................................................4 Prayer Vigils ...................................................................................................................4 Concurrent Resolutions for Use of the Capitol Grounds...............................................................5 Methodology.........................................................................................................................5 Results ..................................................................................................................................5 Nonfederal Government Sponsored Events .....................................................................6 Memorial Services ..........................................................................................................6 Federal Government Sponsored Events ...........................................................................6 Award and Dedication Ceremonies..................................................................................6 Use of Emancipation Hall of the Capitol Visitor Center ...............................................................7 Tables Table 1. Concurrent Resolutions Agreed to for Use of the Rotunda, 101st to 111th Congress ..................................................................................................................................2 Table 2. Concurrent Resolutions Agreed to for Use of the Rotunda, 101st to 111th Congress, by Category .............................................................................................................4 Table 3. Concurrent Resolutions Agreed to for Use of the Capitol Grounds, 101st to 111th Congress ..................................................................................................................................5 Table 4. Concurrent Resolutions Agreed to for Use of the Capitol Grounds, 101st to 111th Congress, by Category .............................................................................................................7 Table A-1. Concurrent Resolutions Agreed to for the Use of the Capitol Rotunda, 101st to 111th Congress..........................................................................................................................8 Table B-1. Concurrent Resolutions Agreed to for the Use of the Capitol Grounds, 101st to 111th Congress........................................................................................................................ 12 Appendixes Appendix A. Concurrent Resolutions for the Use of the Capitol Rotunda.....................................8 Appendix B. Concurrent Resolutions for the Use of the Capitol Grounds................................... 12 Congressional Research Service . Use of the Capitol Rotunda, Capitol Grounds, and Emancipation Hall Contacts Author Contact Information ...................................................................................................... 16 Congressional Research Service . Use of the Capitol Rotunda, Capitol Grounds, and Emancipation Hall Introduction Both the Capitol Rotunda and the Capitol Grounds have been used as the setting for a variety of events, ranging from memorial ceremonies and the reception of foreign dignitaries to the presentation of awards and the hosting of public competitions. This report identifies and categorizes uses of the Capitol Rotunda and Capitol Grounds authorized by concurrent resolutions since the 101st Congress. In most cases, use of the Capitol Rotunda requires a concurrent resolution agreed to by both the House and Senate. 1 A concurrent resolution for the use of the Rotunda typically identifies the event and date for which use is authorized. Often, the resolution also directs physical preparations to be carried out “in accordance with such conditions as the Architect of the Capitol may provide.”2 Use of the Capitol Grounds requires either the passage of a concurrent resolution or permit approval from the Capitol Police. Events that entail the use of the West Front Steps of the Capitol, electricity on the Lower West Terrace of the Capitol, require more than 24 hours from setup to cleanup, require vehicles on Capitol Grounds for setup, or will have a large number of Members in attendance typically require a concurrent resolution.3 All other events can typically be issued permits by the U.S. Capitol Police. 4 Upon the completion and opening of the Capitol Visitor Center (CVC) during the 110th Congress, Emancipation Hall of the CVC became available for use in the same manner as the Rotunda and Capitol Grounds. Use of Emancipation Hall requires the passage of a resolution agreed to by both houses of Congress authorizing its use.5 Concurrent Resolutions for Use of the Rotunda Methodology A database search was conducted using the Legislative Information System (LIS) for the 101st through 111th Congresses (1989-2011). The search was conducted by running a query across all 1 Congressional leaders have authorized the use of the Rotunda without a concurrent resolution for the lying in state of an official when Congress was out of session. For example, use of the Rotunda for the lying in state of President Ford in January 2007 was authorized by the Speaker of the House and the Majority Leader of the Senate. Telephone conversation between the authors and Becky F. Dougherty, protocol officer of the United States Senate, Office of the Sergeant at Arms and Doorkeeper of the Senate, July 24, 2008. 2 For example, see H.Con.Res. 377, 110th Congress. 3 Telephone conversation between the authors and Lt. Kathryn Stillman, special events, U.S. Capitol Police, July 16, 2008. 4 The U.S. Capitol Police application for conducting an event on Capitol Grounds can be found on the Capitol Police website http://www.uscapitolpolice.gov/special_events.php, accessed July 31, 2008. The application, available at http://www.uscapitolpolice.gov/special_events/uscplib_297482_v1_cp_40_guidelines_page.pdf, must be submitted at least 120 hours, or five days, in advance of the activity. 5 Sec. 103, Capitol Visitor Center Act of 2008, P.L. 110-437, Oct. 10, 2008. Congressional Research Service 1 . Use of the Capitol Rotunda, Capitol Grounds, and Emancipation Hall agreed-to concurrent resolutions using the subject term “Rotunda.” The results of the search were then examined individually to differentiate resolutions for the use of the Rotunda from spurious references to it in otherwise unrelated legislation. 6 Results The search identified a total of 67 concurrent resolutions that were agreed to by the House and Senate. Between the 101st Congress and the 111th Congress, the House and Senate agreed to between one and nine concurrent resolutions per Congress that authorized the use of the Rotunda. Table 1 reports the total number of resolutions agreed to in each Congress. Table 1. Concurrent Resolutions Agreed to for Use of the Rotunda, 101st to 111th Congress Congress Number Congress Number 101 (1989-1991) 7 107 (2001-2003) 8 102 (1991-1993) 4 108 (2003-2005) 7 103 (1993-1995) 1 109 (2005-2007) 8 104 (1995-1997) 6 110 (2007-2009) 9 105 (1997-1999) 8 111 (2009-2011) 1a 106 (1999-2001) 8 Total (101st-111th) 67 Source: Database query of Congressional Legislative Information System (LIS), 101st-111th Congress. Notes: a. Data for the 111th Congress includes resolutions agreed to through March 5, 2009. Appendix A, which lists the results of the database search, provides the following information for each concurrent resolution: the Congress in which the resolution was introduced, the resolution number, and the subject of the resolution. Concurrent resolutions authorizing the use of the Rotunda can be divided into seven categories: (1) commemoration ceremonies; (2) congressional gold medal ceremonies; (3) artwork unveilings; (4) presidential inauguration activities; (5) receptions or ceremonies honoring living people; (6) persons lying in state or honor; and (7) prayer vigils. The following sections provide a brief explanation of each category and examples of activities. Table 2 contains the number of concurrent resolutions agreed to by the Congress since 1989, by category. Commemoration Ceremonies The largest percentage of concurrent resolutions agreed to (37.3%) for the use of the Rotunda during the 101st to 111th Congress were for ceremonies commemorating historical events. For example, concurrent resolutions authorizing the use of the Rotunda for a ceremony as part of the commemoration of the days of remembrance of victims of the Holocaust were passed during each 6 Each piece of legislation identified by the search was examined to determine (1) whether the legislation authorized the use of the Rotunda, and (2) the purpose for which the use was authorized. Congressional Research Service 2 . Use of the Capitol Rotunda, Capitol Grounds, and Emancipation Hall Congress.7 In recent Congresses, resolutions were also agreed to for Rotunda ceremonies to commemorate the 60th anniversary of the integration of the United States Armed Forces8 and the 200th birthday of Constantino Brumidi.9 Congressional Gold Medal Ceremonies Ceremonies to award Congressional gold medals account for 22.3% of the concurrent resolutions for the use of the Rotunda agreed to since the 101st Congress. These award ceremonies include presentations of Congressional Gold Medals to Rosa Parks, cartoonist Charles M. Schultz, the Tuskegee Airmen, and other recipients. 10 Artwork Unveilings Since the 101st Congress, 16.4% of concurrent resolutions have been agreed to for the use of the Rotunda for ceremonies to unveil artwork. These have included unveiling ceremonies for portrait busts of former Vice Presidents,11 as well as presentation ceremonies of statutes prior to placement in Statuary Hall.12 Presidential Inaugural Activities In preparation for the quadrennial Presidential inauguration activities that take place at the Capitol, concurrent resolutions were passed during the 102nd, 104th, 106th, 108th, and 110th Congresses.13 These resolutions have authorized the Joint Congressional Committee on Inaugural Ceremonies to use the Rotunda “in connection with the proceedings and ceremonies conducted for the inauguration of the President-elect and the Vice President-elect of the United States.”14 Since the 101st Congress, 7.5% of concurrent resolutions have authorized the use of the Rotunda for inaugural activities. Receiving or Honoring Living Persons Since the 101st Congress, 7.5% of concurrent resolutions have authorized the use of the Rotunda for the purposes of receiving foreign dignitaries or honoring a living person. For example, during the 102nd Congress, use of the Rotunda was authorized for a ceremony and reception for the Dalai 7 For example, see H.Con.Res. 66, 110th Congress. H.Con.Res. 377, 110th Congress. 9 H.Con.Res. 202, 109th Congress. Constantino Brumidi was an artist who painted the “apotheosis of Washington” in the dome of the Capitol as well as frescoes and murals in the first floor hallways on the Senate wing of the Capitol Building. For more information on Constantino Brumidi see U.S. Congress, Architect of the Capitol, Constantino Brumidi: Artist of the Capitol (Washington: GPO, 1998). 10 For a complete list of Congressional Gold Medals awarded, see CRS Report RL30076, Congressional Gold Medals, 1776-2009, by Stephen W. Stathis. 8 11 For example, S.Con.Res. 63, 108th Congress, authorized the use of the Rotunda for an unveiling ceremony of a portrait bust of former Vice-President Quayle. 12 For example, H.Con.Res. 242, 109th Congress, authorized the use of the Rotunda for a presentation ceremony of a statute of Po’Pay, prior to placement in Statuary Hall. 13 For example, see S.Con.Res. 68, 110th Congress. 14 Ibid. Congressional Research Service 3 . Use of the Capitol Rotunda, Capitol Grounds, and Emancipation Hall Lama.15 During the 105th Congress, use of the Rotunda was authorized for a ceremony honoring Mother Teresa.16 Persons Lying in State or Honor Use of the Rotunda for individuals to lie in state or honor comprised 6.0% of Rotunda events authorized by concurrent resolution. These events have included President Reagan17 and Senator Claude Pepper 18 lying in state, Rosa Parks lying in honor,19 and the memorial service for Detective John Michael Gibson and Private First Class Jacob Joseph Chestnut of the United States Capitol Police.20 Prayer Vigils On two occasions during the 107th Congress (3.0% of concurrent resolutions), concurrent resolutions were agreed to for the use of the Rotunda for prayer vigils. H.Con.Res. 233 authorized the use of the Rotunda for a prayer vigil in memory of those who lost their lives on September 11, 2001. S.Con.Res. 83 authorized the use of the Rotunda for a ceremony as part of a National Day of Reconciliation. Table 2. Concurrent Resolutions Agreed to for Use of the Rotunda, 101st to 111th Congress, by Category Category Number Percentage of Total Commemoration Ceremonies 25 37.3 Congressional Gold Medal Ceremonies 15 22.3 Artwork Unveilings 11 16.4 Presidential Inaugural Activities 5 7.5 Receiving or Honoring Living People 5 7.5 Persons Lying in State or Honor 4 6.0 Prayer Vigils 2 3.0 66 100 Total Source: Database query of Congressional Legislative Information System (LIS), 101st-111th Congress 15 H.Con.Res. 115, 102nd Congress. S.Con.Res. 26, 105th Congress. 17 H.Con.Res. 444, 108th Congress; S.Con.Res. 115, 108th Congress. 18 H.Con.Res. 139, 101st Congress. 19 S.Con.Res. 61, 109th Congress. 20 H.Con.Res. 206, 105th Congress. 16 Congressional Research Service 4 . Use of the Capitol Rotunda, Capitol Grounds, and Emancipation Hall Concurrent Resolutions for Use of the Capitol Grounds Methodology A database search was conducted using the Legislative Information System (LIS) for the 101st through 111th Congresses (1989-2009). The search was conducted by running a query using the subject term “Capitol Grounds.” The results of the search were then examined individually to differentiate resolutions for the use of the Capitol Grounds from spurious references to it in otherwise unrelated legislation. 21 The uses of the Capitol Grounds identified here are restricted to those authorized by concurrent resolution of the House and Senate. Results The search identified a total 77 concurrent resolutions that were agreed to by the House and Senate. Between the 101st Congress and the 111th Congress, the House and Senate agreed to between 4 and 14 concurrent resolutions per Congress that authorized the use of the Capitol Grounds. Table 3 reports the total number of resolutions agreed to in each Congress. Table 3. Concurrent Resolutions Agreed to for Use of the Capitol Grounds, 101st to 111th Congress Congress Number Congress Number 101 (1989-1991) 4 107 (2001-2003) 9 102 (1991-1993) 6 108 (2003-2005) 7 103 (1993-1995) 7 109 (2005-2007) 7 104 (1995-1997) 6 110 (2007-2009) 8 105 (1997-1999) 9 111 (2009-2011) 0a 106 (1999-2001) 14 Total (101st-111th) 77 Source: Database query of Congressional Legislative Information System (LIS), 101st-111th Congress. Notes: a. Data for the 111th Congress includes resolutions agreed to through March 5, 2009. Appendix B, which lists the results of the database search, provides the following information for each concurrent resolution: the Congress in which the resolution was introduced, the resolution number, and the subject of the resolution. Concurrent resolutions authorizing the use of the Capitol Grounds can be divided into one of four categories: (1) events sponsored by nonfederal government groups; (2) memorial services; (3) events sponsored by the federal government; and (4) award and dedication ceremonies. The 21 Each piece of legislation identified by the search was examined to determine (1) whether the legislation authorized the use of the Capitol Grounds, and (2) the purpose for which the use was authorized. Congressional Research Service 5 . Use of the Capitol Rotunda, Capitol Grounds, and Emancipation Hall following sections provide a brief explanation of each category with examples of the types of activities concurrent resolutions provided for on the Capitol Grounds. Table 4 contains the number of concurrent resolutions agreed to by Congress since 1989 by category. Nonfederal Government Sponsored Events The largest percentage of concurrent resolutions agreed to (64.9%) in any given Congress are for events that are sponsored by nonfederal government entities. For example, concurrent resolutions authorizing the use of the Capitol Grounds for the Greater Washington Soap Box Derby22 and the District of Columbia Special Olympics Law Enforcement Torch Relay23 are typically agreed to each Congress. Memorial Services Memorial services held on the Capitol Grounds account for 19.5% of the concurrent resolutions passed since the 101st Congress. Each year since 1989, the House and Senate have agreed to a concurrent resolution allowing the National Peace Officer’s Memorial Service to be conducted on Capitol Grounds. 24 The ceremony honors law enforcement officers who gave their lives in the line of duty during the previous year.25 Federal Government Sponsored Events Events sponsored by the federal government compose 11.7% of events on the Capitol Grounds authorized by concurrent resolution. These events have included authorizing the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts to hold performances on the East Front of the Capitol,26 allowing the National Book Festival to run programs on Capitol Grounds,27 and authorizing a celebration for the Library of Congress’s 200th birthday. 28 Award and Dedication Ceremonies Award and dedication ceremonies account for 3.9% of events authorized by concurrent resolution for the Capitol Grounds. Since 1989, three award and dedication ceremonies have been authorized through concurrent resolution. In the 106th Congress (1999-2001), Congress authorized the use of the Capitol Grounds for the dedication of the Japanese-American Memorial to Patriotism;29 in the 108th Congress (2003-2005), the dedication ceremony for the National World War II Memorial was authorized for the Capitol Grounds; 30 and in the 110th Congress 22 For example, see H.Con.Res. 311, 110th Congress. For example, see H.Con.Res. 309, 110th Congress. 24 For example, see H.Con.Res. 308, 110th Congress. 23 25 U.S. Congress, United States Capitol Police, “27th Annual National Peace Officers Memorial Service,” press release, May 13, 2008 http://www.uscapitolpolice.gov/pressreleases/2008/pr_05-13-08.php, accessed July 31, 2008. 26 For example, see H.Con.Res. 76, 107th Congress. 27 For example, see H.Con.Res. 348, 107th Congress. 28 For example, see H.Con.Res. 279, 106th Congress. 29 S.Con.Res. 139, 106th Congress. 30 H.Con.Res. 423, 108th Congress. Congressional Research Service 6 . Use of the Capitol Rotunda, Capitol Grounds, and Emancipation Hall (2007-2009), the presentation ceremony for the Congressional Gold Medal awarded to Tenzin Gyatso, the Fourteenth Dalai Lama, took place on Capitol Grounds.31 Table 4. Concurrent Resolutions Agreed to for Use of the Capitol Grounds, 101st to 111th Congress, by Category Category Number Percentage of Total Nonfederal Government Sponsored Event 50 64.9 Memorial Services 15 19.5 Federal Government Sponsored Events 9 11.7 Award and Dedication Ceremonies 3 3.9 Total 77 100 Source: Database query of Congressional Legislative Information System (LIS), 101st-111th Congress Use of Emancipation Hall of the Capitol Visitor Center Upon the completion and opening of the Capitol Visitor Center (CVC) during the 110th Congress, Emancipation Hall of the CVC became available for use in the same manner as the Rotunda and Capitol Grounds. Use of Emancipation Hall requires the passage of a resolution agreed to by both houses of Congress authorizing its use.32 During the 110th Congress, one concurrent resolution was passed authorizing the use of Emancipation Hall. It provided for the use of the Hall in connection with “ceremonies and activities held in connection with the opening of the Capitol Visitor Center to the public.”33 Consistent with previous resolutions authorizing the use of the Rotunda, the concurrent resolution for the use of Emancipation Hall directed that physical preparations be carried out “in accordance with such conditions as the Architect of the Capitol may provide.”34 To date, in the 111th Congress, no resolutions authorizing the use of Emancipation Hall have been agreed to. 31 H.Con.Res. 196, 110th Congress. Sec. 103, Capitol Visitor Center Act of 2008, P.L. 110-437, Oct. 10, 2008. 33 H.Con.Res. 435, 110th Congress. 34 Ibid. 32 Congressional Research Service 7 . Use of the Capitol Rotunda, Capitol Grounds, and Emancipation Hall Appendix A. Concurrent Resolutions for the Use of the Capitol Rotunda Table A-1. Concurrent Resolutions Agreed to for the Use of the Capitol Rotunda, 101st to 111th Congress Congress Resolution Subject Commemoration Ceremonies 101st (1989-1991) S.Con.Res. 133 Ceremony celebrating American military heroism H.Con.Res. 50 Ceremony as part of the commemoration of the days of remembrance of victims of the Holocaust 102nd (1991-1993) H.Con.Res. 45 Ceremony as part of the commemoration of the days of remembrance of victims of the Holocaust 103rd (1993-1995) H.Con.Res. 41 Ceremony as part of the commemoration of the days of remembrance of victims of the Holocaust 104th (1995-1997) S.Con.Res. 29 Ceremony celebrating the 3000thAnniverary of Jerusalem H.Con.Res. 106 Ceremony as part of the commemoration of the days of remembrance of victims of the Holocaust H.Con.Res. 20 Ceremony as part of the commemoration of the days of remembrance of victims of the Holocaust H.Con.Res. 206 Ceremony as part of the commemoration of the days of remembrance of victims of the Holocaust H.Con.Res. 11 Ceremony as part of the commemoration of the days of remembrance of victims of the Holocaust H.Con.Res. 244 Ceremony as part of the commemoration of the days of remembrance of victims of the Holocaust H.Con.Res. 81 Ceremony in honor of the 50th anniversary of NATO H.Con.Res. 19 Ceremony as part of the commemoration of the days of remembrance of victims of the Holocaust H.Con.Res. 325 Ceremony as part of the commemoration of the days of remembrance of victims of the Holocaust H.Con.Res. 14 Ceremony as part of the commemoration of the days of remembrance of victims of the Holocaust 105th (1997-1999) 106th (1999-2001) 107th (2001-2003) CRS-9 Congress 108th (2003-2005) 109th (2005-2007) 110th (2007-2009) Resolution Subject H.Con.Res. 359 Ceremony as part of the commemoration of the days of remembrance of victims of the Holocaust H.Con.Res. 40 Ceremony as part of the commemoration of the days of remembrance of victims of the Holocaust H.Con.Res. 427 Ceremony for the 75th anniversary of the establishment of the Department of Veterans Affairs H.Con.Res. 350 Ceremony as part of the commemoration of the days of remembrance of victims of the Holocaust H.Con.Res. 202 Ceremony to honor Constantino Brumidi on the 200th anniversary of his birth H.Con.Res. 63 Ceremony as part of the commemoration of the days of remembrance of victims of the Holocaust 105th (1997-1999) 106th (1999-2001) 107th (2001-2003) 108th 109th (2003-2005) (2005-2007) CRS-8 . Use of the Capitol Rotunda, Capitol Grounds, and Emancipation Hall Congress 110th (2007-2009) 111th (2009-2011) Resolution Subject H.Con.Res. 377 Ceremony commemorating the 60th Anniversary of the integration of the Armed Forces H.Con.Res. 313 Ceremony to honor Iraq war troops and those serving in Afghanistan and throughout the world H.Con.Res. 306 Ceremony as part of the commemoration of the days of remembrance of victims of the Holocaust H.Con.Res. 66 Ceremony as part of the commemoration of the days of remembrance of victims of the Holocaust H.Con.Res. 27 Ceremony in honor of the bicentennial of the birth of President Abraham Lincoln Persons Lying in State or Honor 101st (1989-1991) H.Con.Res. 139 Authorizing the use of the rotundaRotunda for the lying in state of the remains of Claude Pepper 105th (1997-1999) H.Con.Res. 310 Authorizing a memorial service for John Gibson and Jacob Chestnut of the Capitol Police 108th (2001-2003) S.Con.Res. 115 Authorizing the use of the rotundaRotunda for the lying in state of the remains of Ronald Reagan 109th (2005-2007) S.Con.Res. 61 Authorizing the remains of Rosa Parks to lie in honor in the rotunda CRS-10 Congress Resolution Subject Rotunda 109th (2005-2007) Congressional Gold Medal Ceremonies 104th (1995-1997) S.Con.Res. 45 Awarding the Congressional Gold Medal to Reverend and Mrs. Billy Graham 105th (1997-1999) H.Con.Res. 326 Presenting the Congressional Gold Medal to Nelson Rolihlahla Mandela 106th (1999-2001) H.Con.Res. 127 Presenting a gold medal on behalf of Congress to Rosa Parks H.Con.Res. 278196 Presenting the Congressional Gold Medal to Mrs. Gerald R. Ford H.Con.Res. 344 Presenting the Congressional Gold Medal to Father Theodore Hesburgh H.Con.Res. 149 Awarding a gold medal on behalf of Congress to Charles M. Schulz H.Con.Res. 374174 Awarding Congressional Gold Medals to the original 29 Navajo Code Talkers H.Con.Res. 305 Awarding a gold medal on behalf of Congress to former President Reagan and his wife H.Con.Res. 469 Awarding the Congressional Gold Medal to General Henry H. Shelton 108th (2003-2005) H.Con.Res. 357 Awarding the Congressional Gold Medal to Dr. Dorothy Height 109th (2005-2007) H.Con.Res. 79 Awarding the Congressional Gold Medal to Jackie Robinson 110th (2007-2009) H.Con.Res. 164 Awarding the Congressional Gold Medal to Dr. Norman E. Borlaug H.Con.Res. 196 Awarding the Congressional Gold Medal to Tenzin Gyatso, the Fourteenth Dali Lama S.Con.Res. 15 Awarding the Congressional Gold Medal to the Tuskegee Airmen S.Con.Res. 71 Awarding the Congressional Gold Medal to Michael Ellis DeBakey, M.D. 107th (2001-2003) CRS-11 Congress Resolution H.Con.Res. 79 Subject Awarding the Congressional Gold Medal to Jackie Robinson CRS-9 . Use of the Capitol Rotunda, Capitol Grounds, and Emancipation Hall Congress Resolution Subject Presidential Inaugural Activities 102nd (1991-1993) S.Con.Res. 103 Use of Rotunda by Joint Congressional Committee on Inaugural Ceremonies for 1992 104th (1995-1997) S.Con.Res. 48 Use of Rotunda by Joint Congressional Committee on Inaugural Ceremonies for 1996 106th (1999-2001) S.Con.Res. 90 Use of Rotunda by Joint Congressional Committee on Inaugural Ceremonies for 2000 108th (2003-2005) S.Con.Res. 93 Use of Rotunda by Joint Congressional Committee on Inaugural Ceremonies for 2004 110th (2007-2009) S.Con.Res. 68 Use of Rotunda by Joint Congressional Committee on Inaugural Ceremonies for 20062008 Artwork Unveiling 101st (1989-1991) S.Con.Res. 5 Ceremony to inaugurate the display of the POW/MIA flag H.Con.Res. 251 Dedication ceremony incidental to the placement of bust of Lajos Kossuth in the Capitol H.Con.Res. 226 Presentation ceremony of statute of Philo T. Farnsworth prior to placement in Statuary Hall 102nd (1991-1993) S.Con.Res. 49 Unveiling ceremony of portrait bust of President George H.W. Bush 104th (1995-1997) H.Con.Res. 10694 Dedication ceremony incidental to the placement of bust of Raoul Wallenberg in the Capitol 105th (1997-1999) H.Con.Res. 25 Presentation ceremony of statute of Jack Swigert prior to placement in Statuary Hall 106th (1999-2001) H.Con.Res. 333 Presentation ceremony of statute of Chief Washakie prior to placement in Statuary Hall 108th (2003-2005) H.Con.Res. 236 Unveiling ceremony of statute of Sarah Sakakawea prior to placement in Statuary Hall CRS-12 Congress 109th (2005-2009) Resolution Subject S.Con.Res. 63 Unveiling ceremony of portrait bust of Vice President Dan Quayle H.Con.Res. 5 Presentation ceremony of statute of Sarah Winnemucca prior to placement in Statuary Hall H.Con.Res. 242 Presentation ceremony of statute of Po’Pay prior to placement in Statuary Hall 102nd 109th (2005-2009) Prayer Vigils 107th (2001-2003) CRS-10 H.Con.Res. 233 Prayer Vigil in memory of those who lost their lives on September 11, 2001 S.Con.Res. 83 Ceremony as part of a National Day of Reconciliation . Use of the Capitol Rotunda, Capitol Grounds, and Emancipation Hall Congress Resolution Subject Receiving or Honoring Living People 101st (1989-1991) H.Con.Res. 344 Reception for His All Holiness Patriach Dimitrios 102nd (1991-1993) H.Con.Res. 115 Ceremony and Reception for the Dalai Lama 105th (1997-1999) S.Con.Res. 56 Ceremony honoring Leslie Townes (Bob) Hope S.Con.Res. 26 Ceremony honoring Mother Teresa H.Con.Res. 134 Reception for His All Holiness Patriarch Bartholomew Source: Database query of Congressional Legislative Information System (LIS), 101st-110th111th Congress CRS-13 Appendix B. Concurrent Resolutions Adopted CRS-11 . Use of the Capitol Rotunda, Capitol Grounds, and Emancipation Hall Appendix B. Concurrent Resolutions for the Use of the Capitol Grounds Table B-1. Concurrent Resolutions Agreed to for the Use of the Capitol Grounds, 101st to 110th111th Congress Congress Resolution Subject Nonfederal Government Sponsored Events 101st (1989-1991) 102nd (1991-1993) 103rd (1993-1995) 104th (1995-1997) CRS-12 H.Con.Res. 71 Torch Relay for 1989 Special Olympics H.Con.Res. 286 Torch Relay for 1990 Special Olympics S.Con.Res. 98 Public event for Earth Day 1990 H.Con.Res. 138 Program for National Physical Fitness and Sports Month H.Con.Res. 331 Greater Washington Soap Box Derby 1992 H.Con.Res. 367 Morning Star Foundation and the 1992 Alliance may present “Native Voices: 500 Years After” S.Con.Res. 34 Torch Relay for 1991 Special Olympics S.Con.Res. 111 Torch Relay for 1992 Special Olympics H.Con.Res. 81 Torch Relay for 1993 Special Olympics H.Con.Res. 82 Greater Washington Soap Box Derby 1993 H.Con.Res. 236 Torch Relay for 1994 Special Olympics H.Con.Res. 238 Greater Washington Soap Box Derby 1994 H.Con.Res. 34 Commemoration of Ringling Brothers and Barnum and Bailey Circus H.Con.Res. 38 Greater Washington Soap Box Derby 1995 CRS-14 Congress 105th (1997-1999) 106th (1999-2001) Resolution Subject H.Con.Res. 64 Torch Relay for 1995 Special Olympics H.Con.Res. 146 Torch Relay for 1996 Special Olympics H.Con.Res. 153 Greater Washington Soap Box Derby 1996 H.Con.Res. 166 Washington for Jesus 1996 prayer rally H.Con.Res. 172 1996 Summer Olympics Torch Run Relay . Use of the Capitol Rotunda, Capitol Grounds, and Emancipation Hall Congress 105th (1997-1999) 106th (1999-2001) 107th (2001-2003) 108th (2001-2003) 109th (2005-2007) CRS-13 Resolution Subject H.Con.Res. 49 Greater Washington Soap Box Derby 1997 H.Con.Res. 67 Torch Relay for 1997 Special Olympics H.Con.Res. 98 SAFE KIDS Buckle Up Car Seat Safety Check H.Con.Res. 238 National Race for the Cure Breast Cancer Survivors Event H.Con.Res. 255 Greater Washington Soap Box Derby 1998 H.Con.Res. 262 District of Columbia 1998 Special Olympics Law Enforcement Torch Run H.Con.Res. 47 Greater Washington Soap Box Derby 1999 H.Con.Res. 49 Earth Force Youth Bike Summit Bike Rodeo H.Con.Res. 50 District of Columbia 1999 Special Olympics Law Enforcement Torch Run H.Con.Res. 105 Law Enforcement Torch Run for the 1999 Special Olympics World Games H.Con.Res. 277 Greater Washington Soap Box Derby 2000 CRS-15 Congress 107th (2001-2003) 108th (2001-2003) 109th (2005-2007) 110th (2007-2009) Resolution Subject H.Con.Res. 280 District of Columbia 2000 Special Olympics Law Enforcement Torch Run H.Con.Res. 314 Earth Force Youth Bike Summit Bike Rodeo H.Con.Res. 423 Million Family March H.Con.Res. 79 Greater Washington Soap Box Derby 2001 H.Con.Res. 87 District of Columbia 2001 Special Olympics Law Enforcement Torch Run H.Con.Res. 356 Greater Washington Soap Box Derby 2002 H.Con.Res. 53 Greater Washington Soap Box Derby 2003 H.Con.Res. 128 District of Columbia 2003 Special Olympics Law Enforcement Torch Run H.Con.Res. 376 Greater Washington Soap Box Derby 2004 H.Con.Res. 389 District of Columbia 2004 Special Olympics Law Enforcement Torch Run H.Con.Res. 86 Greater Washington Soap Box Derby 2005 H.Con.Res. 135 District of Columbia 2005 Special Olympics Law Enforcement Torch Run H.Con.Res. 161 Tenth Anniversary of the Million Man March H.Con.Res. 349 Greater Washington Soap Box Derby 2006 H.Con.Res. 359 District of Columbia 2006 Special Olympics Law Enforcement Torch Run . Use of the Capitol Rotunda, Capitol Grounds, and Emancipation Hall Congress 110th (2007-2009) Resolution Subject H.Con.Res. 79 Greater Washington Soap Box Derby 2007 CRS-16 Congress Resolution Subject H.Con.Res. 123 District of Columbia 2007 Special Olympics Law Enforcement Torch Run H.Con.Res. 309 District of Columbia 2008 Special Olympics Law Enforcement Torch Run H.Con.Res. 311 Greater Washington Soap Box Derby 2008 H.Con.Res. 335 Celebration of the 100th Anniversary of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Incorporated Federal Government Sponsored Events 101st (1989-1991) H.Con.Res. 198 Authorizing a concert performance on Capitol Grounds 103rd (1993-1995) H.Con.Res. 146 Commemoration of the 200th anniversary of the laying of the Capitol cornerstone 105th (1997-1999) H.Con.Res. 265 John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts performances on East Front of Capitol 106th (1999-2001) H.Con.Res. 52 John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts performances on East Front of Capitol H.Con.Res. 279 Library of Congress 200th Birthday Celebration H.Con.Res. 281 John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts performances on East Front of Capitol H.Con.Res. 76 John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts performances on East Front of Capitol S.Con.Res. 41 National Book Festival 2001 H.Con.Res. 348 National Book Festival 2002 107th (2001-2003) CRS-17 Congress Resolution Subject 106th 107th (1999-2001) (2001-2003) Memorial Services 103rd (1993-1995) 103rd (1993-1995) 104th (1995-1997) 105th (1997-1999) 106th (1999-2001) 107th (2001-2003) CRS-14 H.Con.Res. 71 Twelfth Annual National Peace Officers’ Memorial Service H.Con.Res. 237 Thirteenth Annual National Peace Officers’ Memorial Service 104th (1995-1997) H.Con.Res. 147 Fifteenth Annual National Peace Officers’ Memorial Service 105th (1997-1999) H.Con.Res. 66 Sixteenth Annual National Peace Officers’ Memorial Service H.Con.Res. 263 Seventeenth Annual National Peace Officers’ Memorial Service H.Con.Res. 44 Eighteenth Annual National Peace Officers’ Memorial Service H.Con.Res. 278 Nineteenth Annual National Peace Officers’ Memorial Service H.Con.Res. 74 Twentieth Annual National Peace Officers’ Memorial Service H.Con.Res. 347 Twenty-First Annual National Peace Officers’ Memorial Service . Use of the Capitol Rotunda, Capitol Grounds, and Emancipation Hall Congress 108th (2003-2005) 109th 110th (2005-2007) (2007-2009) Resolution Subject H.Con.Res. 96 Twenty-Second Annual National Peace Officers’ Memorial Service H.Con.Res. 388 Twenty-Third Annual National Peace Officers’ Memorial Service H.Con.Res. 136 Twenty-Forth Annual National Peace Officers’ Memorial Service H.Con.Res. 360 Twenty-Fifth Annual National Peace Officers’ Memorial Service H.Con.Res. 124 Twenty-Sixth Annual National Peace Officers’ Memorial Service H.Con.Res. 308 Twenty-Seventh Annual National Peace Officers’ Memorial Service 106th (1999-2001) 107th (2001-2003) 108th (2003-2005) 109th (2005-2007) 110th (2007-2009) CRS-18 Congress Resolution Subject Award and Commemorative Ceremonies 106th (1999-2001) S.Con.Res. 139 Dedication of the Japanese-American Memorial to Patriotism 108th (2003-2005) H.Con.Res. 423 Dedication of the National World War II Memorial (2007-2009) H.Con.Res. 196 Congressional Gold Medal Ceremony for Tenzin Gyatso, the Fourteenth Dalai Lama 110th (2007-2009) 110th Source: Database query of Congressional Legislative Information System (LIS), 101st-110th Congress111th Congress CRS-15 . Use of the Capitol Rotunda, Capitol Grounds, and Emancipation Hall Author Contact Information Matthew Eric Glassman Analyst on the Congress mglassman@crs.loc.gov, 7-3467 Congressional Research Service Jacob R. Straus Analyst on the Congress jstraus@crs.loc.gov, 7-6438 16