Career and Technical Education: Appropriations

Order Code RL33694 Career and Technical Education: Appropriations Updated January 23, 2007 Rebecca R. Skinner and Richard N. Apling Specialists in Social Legislation Domestic Social Policy Division Career and Technical Education: Appropriations Summary The federal government provides support for career and technical education through the Carl D. Perkins Career and Technical Education Improvement Act of 2006 (Perkins IV; P.L. 109-270). Perkins IV, passed by the 109th Congress and signed into law on August, 12, 2006, reauthorized and amended the Perkins Act. Its predecessor, the Carl D. Perkins Vocational and Technical Education Act of 1998 (Perkins III; P.L. 105-332), authorized funding for career and technical education through FY2003, although Congress continued to provide funding under the act through FY2006. The Perkins Act, funded at $1.296 billion in FY2006, is the main source of specific federal funding for career and technical education. In its FY2007 budget request, the Administration proposed the elimination of all dedicated funding for career and technical education. States and local educational agencies (LEAs) would have the option of continuing to support career and technical education through the High School Reform initiative, a new program proposed by the Administration in its FY2007 budget request. Both the House and Senate Committees on Appropriations, however, have reported bills that would continue to fund the Perkins Act at its FY2006 appropriations level. Neither the House nor the Senate has passed Labor, Health and Human Services, and Education (L-HHS-ED) appropriations for FY2007; hence, under the current continuing resolution, L-HHS-ED programs are being funded at the “current rate” for FY2006 — usually equivalent to the FY2006 appropriated level. This report provides an overview of overall federal funding for career and technical education from FY2000 through FY2006. It also discusses appropriations for FY2007, including the FY2007 budget request and House and Senate legislative action. The report concludes with a discussion of state grants provided under the basic state grants and tech-prep programs. This report will be updated as warranted by legislative action. Contents Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Overall Federal Funding for Career and Technical Education . . . . . . . . . . . 2 FY2007 Appropriations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 State Grants . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 List of Tables Table 1. Perkins Act Appropriations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Table 2. Basic State Grants: FY2000-FY2006 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Table 3. Tech-Prep Grants: FY2000-FY2006 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Career and Technical Education: Appropriations Introduction The federal government provides support for career and technical education through the Carl D. Perkins Career and Technical Education Improvement Act of 2006 (Perkins IV; P.L. 109-270).1 Perkins IV, passed by the 109th Congress and signed into law on August, 12, 2006, reauthorized and amended the Perkins Act. Its predecessor, the Carl D. Perkins Vocational and Technical Education Act of 1998 (Perkins III; P.L. 105-332), authorized funding for career and technical education through FY2003, although Congress continued to provide funding under the act through FY2006. The Perkins Act, funded at $1.296 billion in FY2006,2 is the main source of specific federal funding for career and technical education.3 The act probably provides, however, less than 10% of national spending on career and technical education, although no precise calculation of the amount the U.S. spends on career and technical education is available. In its FY2007 budget request, the Administration proposed the elimination of all dedicated funding for career and technical education. States and local educational agencies (LEAs) would have the option of continuing to support career and technical 1 The Career and Technical Education Act (originally enacted in 1963) was named after Carl D. Perkins, the chairman of the House Committee on Education and Labor, in 1984 (Carl Perkins Vocational Education Act of 1984 — P.L. 98-524, “Perkins I”). The Perkins Act was reauthorized in 1991 (Carl D. Perkins Vocational and Applied Technology Education Act — P.L. 101-392, “Perkins II”), in 1998 (Carl D. Perkins Vocational-Technical Education Act Amendments of 1998 — P.L. 105-332, “Perkins III”), and most recently in 2006 (Carl D. Perkins Career and Technical Education Improvement Act of 2006 — P.L. 109-270, “Perkins IV”). For more information about the Carl D. Perkins Vocational and Technical Education Act of 1998, see CRS Report RL31747, The Carl D. Perkins Vocational and Technical Education Act of 1998: Background and Implementation, by Rebecca R. Skinner and Richard N. Apling. For a detailed discussion of changes made to the Perkins Act by P.L. 109-270, see CRS Report RL33624, Career and Technical Education: Selected Changes Made by P.L. 109-270, by Rebecca R. Skinner and Richard N. Apling. 2 The FY2006 appropriation includes the 1% across-the-board reduction required by the FY2006 Defense Appropriations Act (P.L. 109-148). The appropriation was calculated by the U.S. Department of Education, Budget Service, Jan. 4, 2006. 3 Considerably more federal funding is provided indirectly for postsecondary career and technical education through federal student loans and grants. CRS-2 education through the High School Reform initiative, a new program proposed by the Administration in its FY2007 budget request. Both the House and Senate Committees on Appropriations, however, have reported bills that would continue to fund the Perkins Act at its FY2006 appropriations level (H. 5647, H.Rept. 109-515; S. 3708, S.Rept. 109-287), and as noted above, Congress and the President agreed on the reauthorization of the Perkins Act. Neither the House nor the Senate has passed Labor, Health and Human Services, and Education (L-HHS-ED) appropriations for FY2007; hence, under the current continuing resolution, L-HHSED programs are being funded at the “current rate” for FY2006 — usually equivalent to the FY2006 appropriated level.4 This report provides an overview of overall federal funding authorized by the Perkins Act for career and technical education from FY2000 through FY2006. It also discusses appropriations for FY2007, including the FY2007 budget request and House and Senate legislative action. The report concludes with a discussion of state grants provided under the Perkins basic state grants and the tech-prep programs. Overall Federal Funding for Career and Technical Education Federal funding for career and technical education through the Perkins Act has increased modestly since FY2000 (Table 1). This funding principally supports state grants under the basic state grants and tech-prep programs. Funds are also appropriated to support national programs focused on research, development, dissemination, evaluation, and assessment. Prior to FY2006, funds were also appropriated to support occupational and employment information activities and the tech-prep demonstration program.5 Total funding was about $1.193 billion in FY2000 and about $1.296 billion in FY2006 (an 8.7% increase).6 Over the same period, appropriations for basic state grants increased 11.4% (from $1.04 billion to $1.16 billion). Funding for all other programs authorized by the Perkins Act decreased from FY2000 to FY2006, primarily due to funding decreases in FY2006 appropriations. For example, funding for both the tech-prep demonstration program and the occupational and employment information program was eliminated in FY2006. National programs decreased by 22.1% from FY2005 to FY2006, for an overall decrease in funding from FY2000 to FY2006 of 47.6%. Funding for basic state grants and tech-prep was also reduced in 4 On September 29, 2006, the FY2007 Department of Defense appropriations bill (H.R. 5631) was signed by the President (P.L. 109-289). Division B of the act included a continuing resolution to continue federal funding for discretionary programs through November 17, 2006. On November 17, 2006, P.L. 109-369 extended the continuing resolution through December 8, 2006. On December 9, 2006, P.L. 109-383 subsequently extended the continuing resolution through February 15, 2007. 5 P.L. 109-270 did not reauthorize the tech-prep demonstration program. The occupational and employment information program was reauthorized, but neither the House- nor the Senate Committee on Appropriations-reported bills would provide funding for the program in FY2007. 6 Total appropriations for Perkins III peaked in FY2004 at $1.328 million, and have declined in subsequent years. CRS-3 FY2006 due to the 1% across-the-board reduction required by the Defense Appropriations Act (P.L. 109-148). Basic state grants accounted for the majority of FY2006 funding, followed by funding for tech-prep. FY2007 Appropriations In its FY2007 budget request, similar to its FY2005 and FY2006 budget requests, the Bush Administration proposed the elimination of all dedicated federal funding for career and technical education.7 According to the budget request, federal funding for career and technical education would still be available through a new high school initiative being proposed by the Administration, the High School Reform initiative (HSRI). The HSRI would be funded at $1.475 billion for FY2007. The program would support interventions designed to address the “academic performance of students most at risk of failure to meet academic standards” and annual assessments administered in high school.8 States would receive formula grants and would, in turn, award competitive grants to LEAs. Funds could be used by LEAs for a number of interventions, including “programs that combine rigorous academic courses with demanding vocational and technical education courses in order to provide students with high-quality academic and technical training,” dropout prevention programs, and college preparation programs for low-income students.9 7 In its FY2005 and FY2006 budget requests, the Administration also proposed the elimination of the current federal career and technical education programs. In FY2006, the Administration proposed the creation of a High School Intervention initiative, funded at $1.2 billion. This initiative, similar to the initiative proposed for FY2007, would have placed increased emphasis on testing and accountability at the high school level. (U.S. Department of Education, FY2006 Justifications of Appropriation Estimates to Congress, p. M-20.) In FY2005, the Administration requested $1 billion to fund a new program, the Secondary and Technical Education State Grants program. This program would have created “a coordinated high school and technical education improvement program in place of the current Vocational Education State Grants.” (U.S. Department of Education, FY2005 Justifications of Appropriation Estimates to Congress, p. M-15.) 8 U.S. Department of Education, FY2007 Justifications of Appropriation Estimates to Congress, p. A-70. 9 U.S. Department of Education, FY2007 Justifications of Appropriation Estimates to Congress, p. A-71. CRS-4 Table 1. Perkins Act Appropriations (in $000s) Programs % of total for FY2006 % change FY2000 to FY2006 FY2000 FY2001 FY2002 FY2003 FY2004 FY2005 FY2006 $1,037,704 $1,075,360 $1,153,568 $1,165,495 $1,168,240 $1,167,578 $1,155,903 89.2% 11.4% 2,111 2,200 2,360 2,384 2,390 2,389 2,365 0.2% 12.0% 15,835 16,500 17,700 17,883 17,925 17,915 17,736 1.4% 12.0% b 5,940 6,372 6,438 6,453 6,449 6,385 0.5% na $1,055,650 $1,100,00 $1,180,000 $1,192,200 $1,195,008 $1,194,331 $1,182,388 91.2% 12.0% $9,000 $9,000 $9,500 $9,438 $9,382 $9,307 $0 0.0% -100.0 106,000 106,000 108,000 107,298 106,665 105,812 104,754 8.1% -1.2% nac 5,000 5,000 4,968 4,939 4,900 0 0.0% na 4,600 5,600 6,500 nad nad nad nad na na $119,600 $125,600 $129,000 $121,704 $120,986 $120,019 $104,754 8.1% -12.4% $17,500 $17,500 $12,000 $11,922 $11,852 $11,757 $9,164 0.7% -47.6% $1,192,750 $1,243,100 $1,321,000 $1,325,826 $1,327,846 $1,326,107 $1,296,306 100.0% 8.7% Basic grants Basic state grants Territorial set-aside Indian & Hawaiian natives set-aside a na Incentive grants Subtotal (basic grants) Special programs Occupational and employment information Tech-prep education Tech-prep demonstration Tribally controlled postsecondary vocational and technical institutions Subtotal (special programs) e National programs Subtotal (national programs) Total Source: Table prepared by the Congressional Research Service (CRS), Sept. 19, 2006, based on data from the U.S. Department of Education (ED), Budget Office. Note: FY2003, FY2004, and FY2005 appropriations include the across-the-board reduction as calculated by ED. The FY2006 appropriation includes the 1% across-the-board reduction required by the FY2006 Defense Appropriations Act (P.L. 109-148). The appropriation was calculated by the U.S. Department of Education, Budget Service, January 4, 2006. The FY2006 estimates are subject to change. Details may not add to totals due to rounding. CRS-5 a. Incentive grants were authorized under Section 503 of the Workforce Investment Act (WIA; P.L. 105-220). Beginning on July 1, 2000, the Secretary of Labor was authorized to award a grant to each state that exceeded state adjusted performance levels for Title I of WIA, the expected levels of performance for Title II of WIA, and the adjusted levels of performance for Perkins III. Perkins III provided a specific funding authorization to support these incentive grants for FY2000-FY2003. Funds were not authorized for FY1999. While the Perkins Act was not reauthorized until 2006, funding continued to be provided for incentive grants through FY2006. P.L. 109-270 eliminated the set-aside for incentive grant funding beginning in FY2007. Funds previously set aside for this purpose will be provided to states through the basic state grants formula. b. The U.S. Department of Education (ED) was unable to negotiate performance levels with states for FY1999, as states lacked sufficient data for all of the core indicators of performance specified in statutory language. Thus, ED was unable to award incentive grants based on states meeting agreed upon performance levels. For FY2000, Congress reallocated the 0.54% set-aside for incentive grants to basic state grants. c. No funds were appropriated for this program until FY2001. d. The Administration’s budget request for FY2004, FY2005, and FY2006 requested funding for this program, currently authorized by Perkins IV, under the Higher Education account. The Administration proposes reauthorizing this program under the Higher Education Act, which is scheduled for reauthorization in the 110th Congress. For FY2003 and subsequent fiscal years, funding for this program is not reflected in this table for comparability purposes, as ED no longer includes it under career and technical education in its budget tables. e. National programs include research, development, dissemination, evaluation, and assessment. na = not applicable. While the HSRI would provide some flexibility in how funds are used, the HSRI would also require new high school assessments to be administered. Currently, under the Elementary and Secondary Education Act, as amended by the No Child Left Behind Act (P.L. 107-110), high school students must be tested at least once in grades 10-12 in language arts and mathematics. The HSRI would require that students be tested annually in language arts and mathematics in at least two additional high school grades. States would be required to use some of their HSRI funding to support these efforts. Assessments would have to be in place by the 20102011 school year.10 LEAs would be held accountable by their state for improving secondary school student performance. Given the emphasis that would be placed on student assessments, it is possible that LEAs that would receive competitive grants through this initiative could choose to pursue interventions other than career and technical education. It is also possible that LEAs currently using federal dollars to support their career and technical education programs may not receive a competitive grant through the HSRI, possibly reducing or eliminating career and technical education options for students in those LEAs. In addition, no grants would be awarded at the postsecondary level.11 Congress, however, did not authorize the HSRI; rather, it reauthorized the Perkins Act. In addition, Congress has not acted to include the HSRI in FY2007 10 The FY2006 budget request included $250 million specifically for a High School Assessments program to aid states in developing and implementing the additional required assessments. 11 About 38.3% of basic state grants funding under the Perkins Act in 2001 was allocated to the postsecondary level. (U.S. Department of Education, Office of the Under Secretary, Policy and Program Studies Services, 2004, National Assessment of Vocational Education: Final Report to Congress, p. 209.) CRS-6 appropriations, acting instead to continue funding for career and technical education and most of the programs authorized under the Perkins Act.12 Both the House Committee on Appropriations (H.R. 5647; H.Rept. 109-515) and the Senate Committee on Appropriations (S. 3708; S.Rept. 109-287) have reported FY2007 appropriations bills that would provide level funding for career and technical education, at $1,296,306,000.13 State Grants As previously mentioned, the largest program funded by the Perkins Act is the basic state grants program. The program primarily supports career and technical education activities at the secondary and postsecondary levels in LEAs, area career and technical education schools, and institutions of higher education. Uses of funds include, for example, establishing linkages between secondary and postsecondary career and technical education, providing professional development, supporting career and academic counseling, and transitioning students from subbaccalaureate career and technical education programs to baccalaureate degree programs, including the development of articulation agreements. While substantially smaller in terms of funding, the tech-prep program focuses on combining and coordinating secondary and postsecondary career and technical education activities into a coherent sequence of courses. Funds for the basic state grants program and the tech-prep program are distributed to states by formula.14 The formulas are based primarily on population factors and per capita income factors. Weights are assigned to individuals in three population groups — ages 15 to 19, ages 20 to 24, and ages 25 to 65 — with the largest weights assigned to the youngest population group. Per capita income (pci) is defined as the total personal income in a state divided by the population of the state. It affects the weighted population count for each state through an allotment ratio.15 This helps to provide states with lower pci’s with additional grant funds, and vice versa. The distribution of funds is also affected by a minimum grant provision and a hold harmless provision that provides all states with at least their FY1998 grant amount, assuming appropriations are sufficient to do so.16 Tables 2 and 3 provide 12 As previously mentioned, the occupational and employment information program did not receive funding in FY2006, and neither the Administration’s budget request nor the Houseand Senate-reported bills would provide funding for the program in FY2007. The program was reauthorized, however, by P.L. 109-270. The tech-prep demonstration program did not receive funding in FY2006, and was not reauthorized by P.L. 109-270. 13 For more information about FY2007 appropriations for programs administered by the U.S. Department of Education, see CRS Report RL33576, Labor, Health and Human Services, and Education: FY2007 Appropriations, by Paul M. Irwin. 14 For additional information about state grants for career and technical education, see CRS Report RL33676, Career and Technical Education: State Grant Formula, by Rebecca R. Skinner and Richard N. Apling. 15 The allotment ratio is calculated by dividing the pci for a given state by the pci for all states combined. The result is multiplied by 0.5 and subtracted from one. 16 If appropriations were insufficient to provide all states with at least the same amount of (continued...) CRS-7 state grants for the basic state grants and tech-prep programs, respectively. For FY2001 through FY2005, actual grant amounts are included. For FY2006, grant amounts for both programs are estimates produced by the U.S. Department of Education (ED). Table 2. Basic State Grants: FY2000-FY2006 (in $000s) State or other area Alabama Alaska Arizona Arkansas California Colorado Connecticut Delaware District of Columbia Florida Georgia Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma 16 FY2000 actual $19,446 $4,215 $19,342 $11,652 $113,267 $13,771 $8,542 $4,282 $4,215 $50,037 $30,074 $5,189 $6,328 $39,678 $24,025 $12,048 $10,832 $17,954 $21,412 $5,189 $15,184 $17,324 $36,921 $17,174 $13,558 $21,743 $5,055 $6,975 $5,660 $5,189 $21,623 $8,280 $51,362 $29,143 $4,215 $43,459 $15,755 FY2001 actual $20,036 $4,215 $20,179 $11,925 $120,746 $14,415 $8,826 $4,469 $4,215 $51,525 $31,494 $5,377 $6,619 $41,158 $24,787 $12,381 $11,370 $18,365 $22,051 $5,377 $15,994 $17,324 $38,256 $17,411 $13,920 $22,506 $5,269 $7,139 $5,854 $5,377 $22,257 $8,560 $52,487 $29,976 $4,215 $44,683 $16,120 FY2002 actual $21,537 $4,215 $21,690 $12,819 $129,790 $15,495 $9,487 $4,794 $4,215 $55,385 $33,853 $5,768 $7,115 $44,241 $26,643 $13,309 $12,222 $19,740 $23,703 $5,768 $17,193 $18,097 $41,121 $18,715 $14,963 $24,192 $5,652 $7,674 $6,293 $5,768 $23,924 $9,201 $56,419 $32,221 $4,215 $48,030 $17,327 FY2003 actual $21,395 $4,215 $23,460 $13,006 $127,491 $15,876 $9,701 $4,836 $4,215 $59,189 $35,295 $5,827 $6,887 $45,307 $26,934 $13,394 $12,021 $19,223 $23,396 $5,827 $17,119 $19,015 $39,517 $18,499 $14,963 $24,101 $5,632 $7,623 $7,261 $5,827 $23,931 $9,214 $60,300 $34,167 $4,215 $46,602 $17,336 FY2004 actual $21,002 $4,215 $24,282 $12,815 $128,464 $16,090 $9,989 $4,827 $4,215 $61,684 $35,911 $5,841 $6,903 $44,778 $26,552 $13,036 $11,948 $18,777 $22,785 $5,841 $17,358 $18,820 $40,051 $18,535 $14,464 $24,073 $5,530 $7,512 $7,950 $5,841 $24,410 $9,331 $59,439 $34,424 $4,215 $46,604 $16,912 FY2005 actual $20,497 $4,215 $24,337 $12,734 $128,963 $15,651 $10,148 $4,901 $4,215 $62,944 $36,193 $5,838 $6,829 $45,595 $26,493 $12,864 $11,768 $18,412 $22,085 $5,838 $17,146 $18,737 $39,997 $18,755 $14,202 $24,163 $5,516 $7,453 $8,054 $5,838 $24,733 $9,328 $60,106 $34,489 $4,215 $46,468 $16,305 FY2006 estimate $19,991 $4,215 $24,415 $12,540 $128,753 $15,640 $10,136 $4,808 $4,215 $63,436 $36,587 $5,780 $6,792 $44,824 $25,916 $12,321 $11,504 $18,133 $21,534 $5,780 $16,844 $18,419 $39,304 $18,257 $13,923 $23,775 $5,457 $7,138 $8,204 $5,780 $24,716 $9,264 $59,744 $34,797 $4,215 $45,570 $15,943 (...continued) funding they received in FY1998, all states would have their grant amounts ratably reduced. That is, all grants would be reduced by the same percentage. CRS-8 State or other area Oregon Pennsylvania Puerto Rico Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virgin Islands Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Subtotal for states, District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, and Virgin Islands American Samoa Guam Northern Mariana Islands Other outlying areas Indian set-aside Native Hawaiian set-aside Incentive grant set-aside Total FY2000 actual $12,798 $41,166 $18,458 $5,189 $17,175 $4,215 $21,825 $82,286 $12,156 $4,215 $570 $23,699 $20,212 $8,429 $20,976 $4,215 FY2001 actual $13,192 $42,541 $19,090 $5,377 $17,647 $4,329 $22,532 $86,234 $12,454 $4,215 $568 $24,827 $21,232 $8,429 $21,604 $4,215 FY2002 actual $14,180 $45,727 $20,520 $5,768 $18,969 $4,644 $24,219 $92,694 $13,387 $4,215 $584 $26,687 $22,823 $8,924 $23,222 $4,215 $1,037,704 $1,075,360 $1,153,568 $190 $190 $190 $500 $500 $500 FY2003 actual $14,417 $46,626 $20,302 $5,827 $19,338 $4,491 $24,746 $94,261 $13,835 $4,215 $626 $26,356 $22,171 $8,469 $22,779 $4,215 FY2004 actual $14,521 $45,925 $19,844 $5,841 $19,111 $4,475 $24,415 $95,927 $13,170 $4,215 $661 $26,487 $22,640 $8,429 $22,940 $4,215 FY2005 actual $14,556 $46,544 $19,267 $5,838 $18,906 $4,443 $24,293 $95,754 $12,763 $4,215 $640 $26,441 $22,643 $8,429 $22,606 $4,215 FY2006 estimate $14,267 $45,576 $18,977 $5,780 $18,784 $4,372 $23,935 $95,087 $12,346 $4,215 $627 $25,807 $22,629 $8,429 $22,187 $4,215 $1,165,495 $1,168,239 $1,167,578 $190 $190 $190 $500 $500 $500 $1,155,902 $190 $500 $190 $1,231 $13,196 $190 $1,320 $13,750 $190 $1,480 $14,750 $190 $1,504 $14,903 $190 $1,510 $14,938 $190 $1,509 $14,929 $190 $1,485 $14,780 $2,639 $2,750 $2,950 $2,981 $2,988 $2,986 $2,956 $6,438 $6,453 $6,449 $1,192,200 $1,195,008 $1,194,331 $6,385 $1,182,388 na $5,940 $6,372 $1,055,650 $1,100,000 $1,180,000 Source: Table prepared by CRS, Sept. 19, 2006, based on data available from the U.S. Department of Education, Budget Service. Note: Details may not add to totals due to rounding. FY2006 estimates are subject to change. na = Not applicable. Table 3. Tech-Prep Grants: FY2000-FY2006 (in $000s) State Alabama Alaska Arizona Arkansas California Colorado Connecticut Delaware FY2000 actual $1,997 $373 $1,986 $1,197 $11,632 $1,414 $877 $437 FY2001 actual $1,996 $337 $1,988 $1,187 $11,895 $1,420 $870 $440 FY2002 actual $2,021 $343 $2,035 $1,203 $12,178 $1,454 $890 $449 FY2003 actual $1,996 $371 $2,151 $1,192 $11,689 $1,456 $889 $445 FY2004 actual $1,996 $366 $2,186 $1,187 $11,563 $1,448 $899 $441 FY2005 actual $1,996 $363 $2,143 $1,187 $11,356 $1,395 $894 $444 FY2006 estimate $1,996 $360 $1,971 $1,187 $11,260 $1,395 $870 $436 CRS-9 State District of Columbia Florida Georgia Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Puerto Rico Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virgin Islands Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Total FY2000 actual $303 $5,139 $3,088 $530 $650 $4,075 $2,467 $1,245 $1,112 $1,864 $2,199 $530 $1,559 $1,663 $3,792 $1,764 $1,392 $2,233 $516 $716 $581 $530 $2,221 $850 $5,247 $2,996 $371 $4,463 $1,618 $1,314 $4,239 $1,921 $530 $1,764 $423 $2,241 $8,450 $1,248 $355 $58 $2,434 $2,076 $877 $2,154 $286 $106,000 FY2001 actual $322 $5,076 $3,103 $530 $652 $4,055 $2,465 $1,245 $1,120 $1,864 $2,190 $530 $1,576 $1,659 $3,769 $1,737 $1,391 $2,217 $519 $710 $577 $530 $2,193 $843 $5,247 $2,996 $376 $4,450 $1,588 $1,300 $4,239 $1,921 $530 $1,739 $427 $2,233 $8,495 $1,227 $353 $55 $2,446 $2,092 $877 $2,128 $280 $106,000 FY2002 actual $328 $5,196 $3,176 $540 $668 $4,151 $2,500 $1,249 $1,147 $1,864 $2,224 $540 $1,613 $1,698 $3,858 $1,756 $1,404 $2,270 $529 $720 $590 $540 $2,245 $863 $5,293 $3,023 $383 $4,506 $1,626 $1,330 $4,290 $1,925 $540 $1,780 $435 $2,272 $8,697 $1,256 $360 $55 $2,504 $2,141 $877 $2,179 $286 $108,000 FY2003 actual $323 $5,427 $3,236 $536 $631 $4,154 $2,469 $1,245 $1,102 $1,864 $2,190 $536 $1,570 $1,743 $3,644 $1,737 $1,391 $2,210 $519 $710 $666 $536 $2,194 $845 $5,528 $3,133 $365 $4,450 $1,589 $1,322 $4,275 $1,921 $536 $1,773 $413 $2,269 $8,642 $1,268 $361 $58 $2,420 $2,038 $877 $2,107 $286 $107,298 FY2004 actual $342 $5,552 $3,232 $533 $624 $4,052 $2,465 $1,245 $1,075 $1,864 $2,190 $533 $1,562 $1,694 $3,644 $1,737 $1,391 $2,179 $505 $710 $716 $533 $2,197 $840 $5,350 $3,099 $354 $4,450 $1,571 $1,307 $4,239 $1,921 $533 $1,731 $409 $2,233 $8,635 $1,196 $348 $60 $2,420 $2,038 $877 $2,107 $282 $106,665 FY2005 actual $331 $5,543 $3,187 $529 $624 $4,052 $2,465 $1,245 $1,066 $1,864 $2,190 $529 $1,542 $1,650 $3,644 $1,737 $1,391 $2,179 $500 $710 $709 $529 $2,189 $834 $5,293 $3,037 $344 $4,450 $1,571 $1,292 $4,239 $1,921 $529 $1,731 $403 $2,233 $8,432 $1,196 $346 $58 $2,420 $2,038 $877 $2,107 $278 $105,812 FY2006 estimate $322 $5,122 $3,077 $524 $624 $4,052 $2,465 $1,245 $1,066 $1,864 $2,190 $526 $1,542 $1,649 $3,644 $1,737 $1,391 $2,179 $495 $710 $662 $524 $2,189 $834 $5,247 $2,996 $337 $4,450 $1,571 $1,292 $4,239 $1,921 $524 $1,731 $396 $2,233 $8,398 $1,196 $343 $57 $2,420 $2,038 $877 $2,107 $274 $104,754 Source: Table prepared by CRS, Sept. 19, 2006, based on data available from the U.S. Department of Education, Budget Service. Note: Details may not add to totals due to rounding. FY2006 estimates are subject to change. Techprep grants are provided only to the 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, and the Virgin Islands. Other recipients of basic state grants, such as outlying areas, do not receive tech-prep grants. na = Not applicable.