House Committee Funding Legislation, 109th Congress

Order Code RL32793 CRS Report for Congress Received through the CRS Web House Committee Funding Legislation, 109th Congress Updated April 29, 2005 R. Eric Petersen Analyst in American National Government Government and Finance Division Congressional Research Service ˜ The Library of Congress House Committee Funding Legislation, 109th Congress Summary On April 27, 2005, H.Res. 224, providing for the expenses of House committees, other than Appropriations Committee, for the 109th Congress, was adopted by the House by voice vote. On April 21, 2005, Representative Robert Ney, chairman of the Committee on House Administration, introduced the measure, which was referred to the Committee on House Administration. The committee ordered it reported to the House the same day. At the same time, the committee also reportedly adopted regulations limiting committee expenditures for franked mail by committees to $5,000 per year, and required committees to abide by franking regulations similar to those in force for individual Members. House Rules required the House of Representatives to act by March 31, 2005, to provide operating funds for its standing and select committees (except for the Appropriations Committee). On March 2, 2005, Representative Bob Ney, chairman of the committee, introduced H.Res. 133 to provide for the continuing expenses of standing and select committees of the House from April 1, 2005, through April 30, 2005. The House adopted the measure by a vote of 406-0 on March 8. The House Administration Committee typically holds hearings on each committee’s request, and the chair of that committee typically introduces an omnibus funding resolution, based on committee requests. The committee held hearings on March 10, and 16, 2005, and received the testimony of committee chairs and ranking minority members. At the hearing, questions from Members of the House Administration Committee included consideration of the use of the frank by committee chairs, and committee guidelines that provide minority members on panels financed through the House funding process with at least one-third of the committee staff positions, and one-third of committee funds to pay for those positions. This report, which will be updated as events warrant, provides committee funding requests for the 109th Congress and authorizations for House committees in the 104th - 108th Congresses. CRS Report RL32794, House Committee Funding Requests and Authorizations, 104th - 109th Congresses, provides historical and analytical data on funding requests and authorizations for House committees since 1995. Information on Senate committee funding is available in CRS Report RL32779, Senate Committee Funding Resolutions, 109th Congress, and Funding Authorizations 104th - 109th Congresses. Contents Recent Action . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 House Committee Funding Process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 List of Tables Table 1. House Committee Funding Requests and Amounts Authorized by the House, 109th Congress . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Table 2. House Committee Funding Authorizations, 108th and 109th Congresses, Actual Dollars . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Table 3. House Committee Funding Authorizations, 108th and 109th Congresses, Constant Dollars . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Table 4. House Committee Funding Authorizations, 104th - 108th Congresses, Actual Dollars . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Table 5. House Committee Funding: Percentage Changes in Authorizations, Actual Dollars, 105th-109th Congresses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Table 6. House Committee Funding Authorizations, 104th -108th Congresses, Constant Dollars . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Table 7. House Committee Funding: Percentage Changes in Authorizations, Constant Dollars, 105th - 109th Congresses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 House Committee Funding Legislation, 109th Congress Recent Action On April 27, 2005, H.Res. 224, providing for the expenses of House committees, other than Appropriations Committee, for the 109th Congress, was adopted by the House by voice vote. On April 21, 2005, Representative Robert Ney, chairman of the Committee on House Administration, introduced the measure, which was referred to the Committee on House Administration. The committee ordered it reported to the House the same day.1 At the same time, the committee also reportedly adopted regulations limiting committee expenditures for franked mail by committees to $5,000 per year, and required committees to abide by franking regulations similar to those in force for individual Members.2 House Rules required the chamber to act by March 31, 2005, to provide operating funds for its standing and select committees, except for the Appropriations Committee, which is funded separately through legislative branch appropriations bills. On March 2, 2005, Representative Ney introduced H.Res. 133, to provide for the continuing expenses of standing and select committees of the House from April 1, 2005, through April 30, 2005. The House agreed to suspend the rules and adopt the measure by a vote of 406-0 on March 8. Measures introduced to fund individual committee activities, were referred to the Committee on House Administration. The committee held hearings on March 10, and 16, 2005, and received the testimony of committee chairs and ranking minority members. Testimony by the committee chairs reportedly included requests for additional staff; funds for new and existing staff salaries, including cost-of-living increases; proposals to replace office equipment; and funds to upgrade office technologies.3 Questions from Members of the House Administration Committee included consideration of the use of the frank by committee chairs, and committee guidelines 1 “Committee Funding Resolution,” Congressional Record–Daily Digest, Apr. 21, 2005, p. D388. 2 Jennifer Yachnin, “New Rules Limit House Committee Funding,” Roll Call, Apr. 21, 2005, available at [http://www.rollcall.com/issues/1_1/breakingnews/8973-1.html], visited Apr. 22, 2005. 3 Jennifer Yachnin, “House Panels Request More Funding, Space,” Roll Call, Mar. 14, 2005, p. 1, available at [http://www.rollcall.com/issues/50_86/news/8483-1.html], visited Mar. 17, 2005. CRS-2 that provide minority members on panels financed through the House funding process with at least one-third of the committee staff positions, and one-third of committee funds to pay for those positions. Under House Rules, the minority is guaranteed one-third of the first 30 staff positions authorized for a committee, but is not entitled to such a proportion of any additional staff positions. The House Administration committee guidelines reportedly allow for negotiation between a chair and ranking member regarding the exclusion of shared administrative staff who provide services to both parties from the committee staff allocation, and provide the minority with one-third of the remaining positions. Some committees have established such agreements, although most such administrative staff may be majority party staff designees. According to testimony, agreements between other chairs and ranking members include provisions for the joint hiring or minority consultation in administrative staff employment decisions. House Administration guidelines reportedly also recommend provision of onethird of committee funds for equipment, travel and supplies to the minority. Some ranking minority members testifying at the hearing raised concerns that while those funds are generally available to the minority in most committees, ranking members do not control the funds and must seek approval from committee chairs. In their testimony, some committee chairs noted that minority requests for travel, supplies, and other funds are routinely granted, and that under the Rules of the House, Committee chairs are solely responsible for all committee funds. All Members who testified seemed to agree that, while some disparities among committees on the allocation to the minority of travel funds and office equipment may still exist despite House Administration guidelines, since the 103rd Congress, the minority party has been treated more equitably than before in the allocation of House committee staff and resources.4 Typically, following the hearings on committee funding requests, the chair of the House Administration Committee then introduces an omnibus funding resolution, which, after its referral to the House Administration Committee, has traditionally served as the legislative vehicle for a full committee markup. The House normally acts on committee funding resolutions during the last week of March in the first year of a Congress. On April 21, 2005, Representative Ney introduced H.Res. 224, providing for the expenses of House committees, other than the Appropriations Committee, for the 109th Congress. The measure was referred to the Committee on House Administration, which ordered it reported to the House the same day. At the same time, the committee also reportedly adopted regulations limiting committee expenditures for franked mail by committees to $5,000 per year, and required 4 Unrelated to the funding proposals considered at the hearings, several committee chairs and ranking members reportedly raised concerns regarding the sufficiency of office space in congressional buildings to support staff and committee operations. See Ibid., and Jennifer Yachnin, “Ethics Seeks Big Budget Increase,” Roll Call, Mar. 17, 2005, p 1, available at [http://www.rollcall.com/issues/50_89/news/8574-1.html], visited Mar. 17, 2005. CRS-3 committees to abide by franking regulations similar to those in force for individual Members.5 On April 27, 2005, the House of Representatives adopted H.Res. 224 by a voice vote. Table 1 summarizes requests from individual committees and amounts reported by the Committee on House Administration. Table 2 provides committee funding levels for the 109th Congress, as reported by the Committee on House Administration on April 26, 2005 in H.Rept. 109-54, and authorizations for House committees in the 108th Congress. Table 3 provides the same information, calculated in constant (January 2005) dollars.6 Tables 4 includes authorizations for House committees in the 104th -108th Congresses in actual dollars. Table 5 provides the percentage change in committee authorizations in the 105th-109th Congresses, based on actual dollars. Tables 6 and 7 provide the same information in constant dollars. House Committee Funding Process Under House Rule X, clause 6, each standing and select committee of the House (except the Appropriations Committee) is required to submit an operating budget request for its necessary expenses over the two years of a Congress. The budgetary requests include estimated salary needs for staff, costs of consulting services, printing costs, office equipment and supply costs, and travel costs for committee members and staff. Some costs (such as pension and insurance contributions for committee employees) are not directly billed to the committee and are paid from other appropriated funds. Individual committee requests are then packaged by the House Administration Committee into an omnibus “primary expense resolution.” Clause 6(c) requires that “the minority party (be) treated fairly in the appointment” of committee staff employed pursuant to such expense resolutions. Prior to the 104th Congress, House rules provided a base level of 30 so-called “statutory” staff positions for all House standing committees (except the Appropriations Committee). Funds for these staff were provided through a line-item appropriation and were not included in the funding resolutions reported from the House Administration Committee. In the 104th Congress, House rules were changed to (1) provide for biennial committee funding resolutions, and (2) include funding authorization for the baseline 30 staff positions in each committee’s funding 5 Jennifer Yachnin, “New Rules Limit House Committee Funding,” Roll Call, Apr. 21, 2005, available at [http://www.rollcall.com/issues/1_1/breakingnews/8973-1.html], visited Apr. 22, 2005. 6 CRS Report RL32794, House Committee Funding Requests and Authorizations, 104th 108th Congresses, by R. Eric Petersen, provides historical and analytical data on funding requests and authorizations for House committees since 1995. Information on Senate committee funding is available in CRS Report RL32779, Senate Committee Funding Resolutions, 109th Congress, and Funding Authorizations 104th - 109th Congresses, by R. Eric Petersen. CRS-4 authorization.7 Twenty of these positions are allotted to the committee majority and 10 to the committee minority. The House majority leadership has encouraged its committee leaders to move as quickly as possible to provide the minority with onethird of the remaining committee staff and resources authorized in the biennial funding resolutions. Statements made by leaders of the House Administration Committee at the beginning of its committee funding review for the 107th Congress, and reaffirmed at the beginning of the 108th and 109th Congresses, indicate a general consensus that all House committees should provide at least one-third minority staffing this Congress. Each committee is encouraged to discuss its proposed budget and approve it at a committee organization meeting. Some committees, however, do not prepare or approve their draft budgets this way. Each committee chair normally introduces a House resolution to provide his or her committee with the requisite funds for the two years of the Congress. These individual resolutions are then referred to the House Administration Committee, which holds public hearings on each committee’s request. The chair and the ranking minority member from each committee normally testify at these hearings. The committee held hearings on March 10, and 16, 2005, and received the testimony of committee chairs and ranking minority members. The chair of the House Administration Committee then typically introduces an omnibus funding resolution, which, after its referral to the House Administration Committee, has served as the legislative vehicle for a full committee markup. The chairman’s resolution usually incorporates, without change, the amounts requested by each committee. The House normally acts on committee funding resolutions during the last week of March in the first year of a Congress. The committee funding resolution is normally called up as privileged business under the Rules of the House, allowing it to be called up and considered without the need for a special rule from the Rules Committee. Privileged funding resolutions are considered in the House under the one-hour rule and, typically, the majority party manager does not yield the floor to permit amendments to be offered. (The committee-reported amendment is automatically laid before the House.) At the end of one hour of debate, the majority party manager moves the previous question and, if agreed to, the House votes on final passage of the resolution. Before the vote on final passage, it has become customary for the minority party to offer a motion to recommit the funding resolution. This motion normally permits the minority to offer an alternative funding proposal and to obtain a House vote on it. Owing to the bipartisan consensus on the funding resolution in the past three Congresses, House Democrats did not offer such a motion in 2005, 2003, or 2001. 7 As before, these provisions were not made applicable to the House Appropriations Committee. CRS-5 Table 1. House Committee Funding Requests and Amounts Authorized by the House, 109th Congress Committee Agriculture Armed Services Budget Education and the Workforce Energy and Commerce Financial Services Government Reform Homeland Security House Administration International Relations Judiciary Resources Rules Science Small Business Standards Transportation and Infrastructure Veterans' Affairs Ways and Means Permanent Select Intelligence Request $11,562,481 13,333,137 12,026,478 15,493,286 21,388,076 16,127,977 21,349,000 15,787,494 10,101,152 18,869,785 18,263,201 14,805,934 6,365,600 13,146,852 6,034,058 4,768,734 18,582,105 7,933,081 17,819,494 9,875,429 1st Session $5,595,604 6,387,373 6,013,239 7,708,622 10,297,200 7,831,097 10,624,500 7,462,855 4,822,199 9,092,015 8,972,238 7,289,521 3,176,144 6,388,306 2,987,331 2,300,779 9,007,388 3,832,415 8,732,509 5,436,490 2nd Session $5,966,877 6,945,764 6,013,239 7,784,664 11,090,876 8,296,880 10,724,500 8,324,639 5,278,953 9,777,770 9,290,962 7,516,413 3,189,456 6,758,546 3,046,727 2,467,955 9,574,717 4,100,666 9,086,985 4,438,939 Authorized $11,257,009 12,826,208 12,026,478 15,493,286 19,925,687 15,203,100 20,497,085 14,000,000 9,554,568 16,299,018 15,312,992 14,520,962 6,365,600 12,327,996 5,586,973 4,290,536 18,108,082 6,474,418 17,819,494 9,527,870 Source: Data taken from committee funding resolutions introduced in the House for the 109th Congress, and H.Res. 224. 1st Session $5,495,805 6,292,249 6,013,239 7,705,970 9,812,619 7,427,648 10,121,443 6,100,026 4,648,683 7,946,084 7,461,565 7,178,224 3,074,229 6,101,648 2,721,600 1,891,890 8,856,869 3,075,732 8,674,514 4,500,653 2nd Session $5,761,204 6,533,959 6,013,239 7,787,316 10,113,068 7,775,452 10,375,642 7,899,974 4,905,885 8,352,934 7,851,427 7,342,738 3,291,371 6,226,348 2,865,373 2,398,646 9,251,213 3,398,686 9,144,980 5,027,217 Difference -$305,472 -506,929 0 0 -1,462,389 -924,877 -851,915 -1,787,494 -546,584 -2,570,767 -2,950,209 -284,972 0 -818,856 -447,085 -478,198 -474,023 -1,458,663 0 -347,559 % -2.64% -3.80 0.00 0.00 -6.84 -5.73 -3.99 -11.32 -5.41 -13.62 -16.15 -1.92 0.00 -6.23 -7.41 -10.03 -2.55 -18.39 0.00 -3.52 CRS-6 Table 2. House Committee Funding Authorizations, 108th and 109th Congresses, Actual Dollars Committee Agriculture Armed Services Budget Education and the Workforce Energy and Commerce Financial Services Government Reform Homeland Security House Administration International Relations Judiciary Resources Rules Science Small Business Standards Transportation and Infrastructure Veterans' Affairs Ways and Means Permanent Select Intelligence 108th Congress Approved $10,327,531 11,931,357 11,869,572 14,673,371 18,622,138 13,696,487 19,614,435 10,952,787 8,527,057 14,552,695 14,048,616 13,509,424 5,669,311 11,690,845 5,120,301 3,071,250 16,461,893 5,486,795 16,136,288 7,809,730 1st Session $5,084,900 5,871,876 5,856,333 7,047,896 9,101,042 6,601,085 9,740,963 5,366,866 4,122,092 6,993,645 6,957,554 6,492,029 2,797,898 5,711,401 2,535,261 1,527,825 7,982,558 2,703,328 7,908,037 3,780,487 Source: Data taken from H. RES. 148, 108th Congress, and H.Res. 224, 109th Congress. a. In the 108th Congress, the Committee on Homeland Security was a select committee. 109th Congress 2nd Session $5,242,632 6,059,481 6,013,239 7,625,475 9,521,097 7,095,402 9,873,472 5,585,921 4,404,965 7,559,050 7,091,062 7,017,395 2,871,413 5,979,444 2,585,041 1,543,425 8,479,334 2,783,466 8,228,251 4,029,243 Authorized $11,257,009 12,826,208 12,026,478 15,493,286 19,925,687 15,203,100 20,497,085 14,000,000 9,554,568 16,299,018 15,312,992 14,520,962 6,365,600 12,327,996 5,586,973 4,290,536 18,108,082 6,474,418 17,819,494 9,527,870 1st Session $5,495,805 6,292,249 6,013,239 7,705,970 9,812,619 7,427,648 10,121,443 6,100,026 4,648,683 7,946,084 7,461,565 7,178,224 3,074,229 6,101,648 2,721,600 1,891,890 8,856,869 3,075,732 8,674,514 4,500,653 2nd Session $5,761,204 6,533,959 6,013,239 7,787,316 10,113,068 7,775,452 10,375,642 7,899,974 4,905,885 8,352,934 7,851,427 7,342,738 3,291,371 6,226,348 2,865,373 2,398,646 9,251,213 3,398,686 9,144,980 5,027,217 Change 9.00% 7.50 1.32 5.59 7.00 11.00 4.50 27.82 12.05 12.00 9.00 7.49 12.28 5.45 9.11 39.70 10.00 18.00 10.43 22.00 CRS-7 Table 3. House Committee Funding Authorizations, 108th and 109th Congresses, Constant Dollars Committee Agriculture Armed Services Budget Education and the Workforce Energy and Commerce Financial Services Government Reform Homeland Security House Administration International Relations Judiciary Resources Rules Science Small Business Standards Transportation and Infrastructure Veterans' Affairs Ways and Means Permanent Select Intelligence Approved $10,703,588 12,365,814 12,301,779 15,207,673 19,300,227 14,195,218 20,328,656 11,351,611 8,837,553 15,082,603 14,560,169 14,001,343 5,875,748 12,116,544 5,306,747 3,183,084 17,061,321 5,686,586 16,723,859 8,094,106 108th Congress 1st Session $5,270,057 6,085,689 6,069,580 7,304,531 9,432,439 6,841,451 10,095,661 5,562,290 4,272,190 7,248,305 7,210,900 6,728,424 2,899,778 5,919,370 2,627,578 1,583,458 8,273,227 2,801,764 8,195,993 3,918,146 nd 2 Session $5,433,532 6,280,125 6,232,199 7,903,142 9,867,789 7,353,767 10,232,995 5,789,321 4,565,363 7,834,298 7,349,269 7,272,920 2,975,970 6,197,174 2,679,170 1,599,626 8,788,092 2,884,820 8,527,867 4,175,960 109th Congress Reported 1st Session $11,257,009 $5,495,805 12,826,208 6,292,249 12,026,478 6,013,239 15,493,286 7,705,970 19,925,687 9,812,619 15,203,100 7,427,648 20,497,085 10,121,443 14,000,000 6,100,026 9,554,568 4,648,683 16,299,018 7,946,084 15,312,992 7,461,565 14,520,962 7,178,224 6,365,600 3,074,229 12,327,996 6,101,648 5,586,973 2,721,600 4,290,536 1,891,890 18,108,082 8,856,869 6,474,418 3,075,732 17,819,494 8,674,514 9,527,870 4,500,653 nd 2 Session $5,761,204 6,533,959 6,013,239 7,787,316 10,113,068 7,775,452 10,375,642 7,899,974 4,905,885 8,352,934 7,851,427 7,342,738 3,291,371 6,226,348 2,865,373 2,398,646 9,251,213 3,398,686 9,144,980 5,027,217 Proposed Change 5.17% 3.72 -2.24 1.88 3.24 7.10 0.83 23.33 8.11 8.07 5.17 3.71 8.34 1.75 5.28 34.79 6.14 13.85 6.55 17.71 Source: Based on data taken from H.Res. 148, 108th Congress, and H.Res. 224, 109th Congress, and the Consumer Price Index. See U.S. Department Of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics, Consumer Price Index, Feb. 23, 2005, available at [ftp://ftp.bls.gov/pub/special.requests/cpi/cpiai.txt]. Note: January, 2005 dollars. a. In the 108th Congress, the Committee on Homeland Security was a select committee. CRS-8 Table 4. House Committee Funding Authorizations, 104th - 108th Congresses, Actual Dollars 104th Congress 105th Congress 106th Congress 107th Congress 108th Congress Approved Approved Approved Approved Approved Committee Agriculture $7,406,899 $7,656,162 Armed Services 9,085,743 9,721,745 Budget 9,912,000 9,940,000 Education and the Workforce 9,621,539 10,125,113 Energy and Commerce 13,686,823 14,535,406 Financial Services 8,645,054 8,901,617 Government Reform 13,520,037 20,020,572 Homeland Securitya — — House Administration 6,177,608 6,050,349 International Relations 10,028,093 10,368,358 Judiciary 9,553,190 10,604,041 Resources 9,588,953 9,876,550 Rules 4,433,817 4,649,102 Science 8,411,326 8,677,830 Small Business 3,791,580 3,906,941 Standards 1,981,150 2,456,300 Transportation and Infrastructure 10,878,981 12,184,459 Veterans’ Affairs 4,220,605 4,344,160 Ways and Means 10,219,358 11,036,907 Permanent Select Intelligence 4,519,890 4,815,526 Reserve Fund — 7,900,000 Source: Data taken from committee funding resolutions introduced in the House for each Congress. Notes: Renamed committees are listed according to their names and types in the 109th Congress. a. In the 108th Congress, the Committee on Homeland Security was a select committee. $8,414,033 10,342,681 9,940,000 11,200,497 15,285,113 9,307,521 19,770,233 — 6,251,871 11,313,531 12,152,275 10,567,908 5,069,424 8,931,726 4,148,880 2,632,915 13,220,138 4,735,135 11,930,338 5,164,444 3,000,000 $9,607,006 10,872,677 11,107,043 13,573,886 17,226,770 11,846,231 19,420,233 — 7,418,045 12,672,626 13,166,463 11,601,260 5,370,773 10,628,041 4,798,783 2,871,091 14,479,551 5,142,263 14,748,888 6,955,074 — $10,327,531 11,931,357 11,869,572 14,673,371 18,622,138 13,696,487 19,614,435 10,952,787 8,527,057 14,552,695 14,048,616 13,509,424 5,669,311 11,690,845 5,120,301 3,071,250 16,461,893 5,486,795 16,136,288 7,809,730 — CRS-9 Table 5. House Committee Funding: Percentage Changes in Authorizations, Actual Dollars, 105th-109th Congresses (in percentages %) Committee 105th 106th 107th 108th Congress Congress Congress Congress Change 104th -109th Congresses Change Change Change Change Agriculture 3.37 9.90 14.18 7.50 9.00 51.98 Armed Services 7.00 6.39 5.12 9.74 7.50 41.17 Budget 0.28 0.00 11.74 6.87 1.32 21.33 Education and the Workforce 5.23 10.62 21.19 8.10 5.59 61.03 Energy and Commerce 6.20 5.16 12.70 8.10 7.00 45.58 Financial Services 2.97 4.56 27.28 15.62 11.00 75.86 48.08 -1.25 -1.77 1.00 4.50 51.61 Government Reform Change 109th Congress Homeland Security 27.82 House Administration -2.06 3.33 18.65 14.95 12.05 54.66 International Relations 3.39 9.12 12.01 14.84 12.00 62.53 Judiciary 11.00 14.60 8.35 6.70 9.00 60.29 Resources 3.00 7.00 9.78 16.45 7.49 51.43 Rules 4.86 9.04 5.94 5.56 12.28 43.57 Science 3.17 2.93 18.99 10.00 5.45 46.56 Small Business 3.04 6.19 15.66 6.70 9.11 47.35 Standards 23.98 7.19 9.05 6.97 39.70 116.57 Transportation and Infrastructure 12.00 8.50 9.53 13.69 10.00 66.45 Veterans’ Affairs 2.93 9.00 8.60 6.70 18.00 53.40 Ways and Means 8.00 8.09 23.63 8.32 10.43 74.37 Permanent Select Intelligence 6.54 7.25 34.67 12.29 22.00 110.80 Source: Based on data taken from committee funding resolutions introduced in the House for each Congress. Notes: Renamed committees are listed according to their names and types in the 109th Congress. a. In the 108th Congress, the Committee on Homeland Security was a select committee. CRS-10 Table 6. House Committee Funding Authorizations, 104th -108th Congresses, Constant Dollars 104th Congress 105th Congress 106th Congress 107th Congress 108th Congress Approved Approved Approved Approved Approved Agriculture $9,268,344 $9,096,761 $9,631,189 $10,344,755 $10,703,588 Armed Services 11,369,102 11,551,008 11,838,831 11,707,620 12,365,814 Budget 12,403,008 11,810,330 11,377,899 11,959,984 12,301,779 Education and the Workforce 12,039,550 12,030,274 12,820,737 14,616,262 15,207,673 Energy and Commerce 17,126,490 17,270,417 17,496,225 18,549,661 19,300,227 Financial Services 10,817,663 10,576,563 10,653,927 12,755,936 14,195,218 16,917,789 23,787,683 22,630,153 20,911,567 20,328,656 — — — — 11,351,611 House Administration 7,730,117 7,188,795 7,156,253 7,987,697 8,837,553 International Relations 12,548,276 12,319,289 12,950,122 13,645,792 15,082,603 Judiciary 11,954,024 12,599,318 13,910,197 14,177,552 14,560,169 Resources 11,998,775 11,734,941 12,096,639 12,492,153 14,001,343 5,548,090 5,523,886 5,802,756 5,783,210 5,875,748 10,525,196 10,310,668 10,223,770 11,444,198 12,116,544 Small Business 4,744,451 4,642,079 4,749,048 5,167,295 5,306,747 Standards 2,479,037 2,918,482 3,013,787 3,091,570 3,183,084 13,613,003 14,477,111 15,132,535 15,591,476 17,061,321 Veterans’ Affairs 5,281,295 5,161,566 5,420,110 5,537,152 5,686,586 Ways and Means 12,787,609 13,113,633 13,656,155 15,881,496 16,558,033 Permanent Select Intelligence 5,655,794 5,721,625 5,911,521 7,489,173 8,094,106 9,386,480 3,433,974 Committee Government Reform a Homeland Security Rules Science Transportation and Infrastructure Reserve Fund Source: Based on data taken from committee funding resolutions introduced in the House for each Congress, and the Consumer Price Index. See U.S. Department Of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics, Consumer Price Index, Feb. 23, 2005, available at [ftp://ftp.bls.gov/pub/special.requests/cpi/cpiai.txt], visited Feb. 23, 2005. Notes: January, 2005 dollars. Renamed committees are listed according to their names and types in the 109th Congress. a. In the 108th Congress, the Committee on Homeland Security was a select committee. CRS-11 Table 7. House Committee Funding: Percentage Changes in Authorizations, Constant Dollars, 105th - 109th Congresses (in percentages %) Committee 106th 107th 105th Congress Congress Congress Change Agriculture Change Change 108th Congress 109th Congress 104th -108th Congresses Change Change Change -1.85 5.87 7.41 3.47 5.17 21.46 1.60 2.49 -1.11 5.62 3.72 12.82 Budget -4.78 -3.66 5.12 2.86 -2.24 -3.04 Education and the Workforce -0.08 6.57 14.00 4.05 1.88 28.69 0.84 1.31 6.02 4.05 3.24 16.34 Financial Services -2.23 0.73 19.73 11.28 7.10 40.54 Government Reform 40.61 -4.87 -7.59 -2.79 0.83 21.16 Homeland Security - Armed Services Energy and Commerce - - - 23.33 - House Administration -7.00 -0.45 11.62 10.64 8.11 23.60 International Relations -1.82 5.12 5.37 10.53 8.07 29.89 Judiciary 5.40 10.40 1.92 2.70 5.17 28.10 Resources -2.20 3.08 3.27 12.08 3.71 21.02 Rules -0.44 5.05 -0.34 1.60 8.34 14.73 Science -2.04 -0.84 11.94 5.87 1.75 17.13 Small Business -2.16 2.30 8.81 2.70 5.28 17.76 Standards 17.73 3.27 2.58 2.96 34.79 73.07 6.35 4.53 3.03 9.43 6.14 33.02 Veterans’ Affairs -2.27 5.01 2.16 2.70 13.85 22.59 Ways and Means 2.55 4.14 16.30 4.26 6.55 39.35 Permanent Select Intelligence 1.16 3.32 26.69 8.08 17.71 68.46 Transportation and Infrastructure Source: Based on data taken from committee funding resolutions introduced in the House for each Congress, and the Consumer Price Index. See U.S. Department Of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics, Consumer Price Index, Feb. 23, 2005, available at [ftp://ftp.bls.gov/pub/special.requests/cpi/cpiai.txt], visited Feb. 23, 2005. Notes: January, 2005 dollars. Renamed committees are listed according to their names and types in the 109th Congress. a. In the 108th Congress, the Committee on Homeland Security was a select committee