Committee Funding for the House and Senate, 108th Congress

The Senate adopted ad hoc procedures in approving committee operating budgets. With the Senate divided 51-48-1 at the beginning of the 108th Congress, Senate Democrats argued for a proportional allocation of committee staff between the parties. On January 15, after a week-long delay in the appointment of Senate committees, a unanimous consent agreement was reached providing for the proportional allocation of staff and office space between the parties on each committee, with a separate provision for each committee chair to control up to 10% of the committee budget to employ administrative staff serving both parties.

Order Code RL31816 Report for Congress Received through the CRS Web Committee Funding for the House and Senate, 108th Congress Updated May 7, 2003 Paul S. Rundquist Specialist in American National Government Government and Finance Division R. Eric Petersen Analyst in American National Government Government and Finance Division Congressional Research Service ˜ The Library of Congress Committee Funding for the House and Senate, 108th Congress Summary House rules require action to approve resolutions providing funds for committee operations by the end of March 2003. Because of unforeseen delays in completing action on the committee funding resolution, the House has twice (H.Res. 163, adopted March 26, 2003, and H.Res. 185, adopted April 9, 2003) agreed to short term extensions of 107th Congress committee funding levels. Funding authority has now been extended up through May 9, 2003. Relatedly, the Emergency Wartime Supplemental Appropriations Act, FY2003 (P.L. 108-11, signed April 18, 2003) provides $11 million to the House Select Committee on Homeland Security to fund its operations through December 2004. On May 6, 2003, the House Administration Committee reported H.Res. 148, an omnibus funding resolution, with an amendment in the nature of a substitute providing 108th Congress funds for all House committees, except for the Appropriations and Homeland Security Committees. The House agreed to a unanimous consent request to make H.Res. 148 in order at any time on May 7, with the stipulation that the committee amendment be considered as adopted and that the resolution be debated for one hour equally divided and controlled. Under House Rules, funds for committees (except for the Appropriations Committee) are to be approved by March 31 of the first session of each new Congress. In early March 2003, the House Administration Committee began to consider budget requests from House Committees. Previously, on February 13, 2003, the House took up by unanimous consent H.Res. 77, providing interim funding from January 3, 2003 to March 31, 2003 for the newly established House Select Committee on Homeland Security. (Committees funded in the 107th Congress are authorized to spend at the same monthly rate until House action on the 108th Congress funding resolution. H.Res. 163, agreed to on March 26, 2003, continued committee funds through April 11, 2003. On April 9, 2003, the House approved H.Res. 185, continuing that funding authority up through May 9, 2003.) As in previous Congresses, a major concern in the House committee funding process will be assuring that the minority party members on each committee have at least onethird of the committee’s staff and funds. There is also concern about rising committee costs since 1995, when the House cut its committee staff size by onethird. The Senate adopted ad hoc procedures in approving committee operating budgets. With the Senate divided 51-48-1 at the beginning of the 108th Congress, Senate Democrats argued for a proportional allocation of committee staff between the parties. On January 15, a unanimous consent agreement was reached providing for the proportional allocation of staff and office space between the parties on each committee, with a separate provision for each committee chair to control up to 10% of the committee budget to employ administrative staff serving both parties. Thereafter, Senate Rules and Administration Committee consideration of committee funding requests was routine, and the Senate agreed on February 28, 2003, to S.Res. 66, authorizing funds for Senate committees through February 2005. Contents Recent Action . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Committee Funding in the 107th Congress . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 House Floor Action in 108th Congress . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 House Committee Action . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 House Funding Procedures and Issues . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Senate Committee Funding Action, 108th Congress . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Senate Committee Funding Rules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 List of Tables Table 1. House Committee Funding, Committee Requests and House Administration Committee Recommendations, 108th Congress . . . . . . . . . . 9 Table 2. House Committee Funding, 105th Congress-107th Congress . . . . . . . . 10 Table 3. Senate Committee Funding, Committee Requests and Funding Approved by the Senate, 108th Congress . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Table 4. Senate Committee Funding, 105th Congress-108th Congress . . . . . . . . . 12 Committee Funding for the House and Senate, 108th Congress Recent Action House Rules required it to act by March 31, 2003, to provide operating funds for its standing and select committees (except for Appropriations). Temporary funding authority provided by House Rules was set to expire on that date. H.Res. 148, an omnibus funding resolution, was introduced by Representative Robert W. Ney, the chairman of the House Administration Committee, on March 18, 2003. The resolution incorporates the amounts requested by each House committee into one resolution. On March 26, 2003, the House agreed by unanimous consent to H.Res. 163, providing a temporary funding extension until April 11, 2003. On April 9, 2003, the House took up and approved by unanimous consent H.Res. 185, extending that temporary authority up through May 9, 2003. On May 6, 2003, the House Administration Committee adopted an amendment in the nature of a substitute to H.Res. 148, reducing by more than $18 million the amounts requested by House Committees. H.Res. 148, as amended, was reported (H.Rept. 108-91) from the committee the same day by voice vote. A unanimous consent agreement in the House authorized the House to take up H.Res. 148 at any time on May 7, 2003, and to consider the funding resolution, as amended, under the One-Hour Rule, with time equally divided and controlled by the chairman and ranking minority member of the House Administration Committee. Earlier, the House agreed to H.Res.77, authorizing temporary funding of $700,000 for the newly created House Select Committee on Homeland Security, up through March 31, 2003. The two House temporary funding extensions applied to the Select Committee as well. However, on April 18, 2003, the President signed into law P.L. 108-11, the Emergency Wartime Supplemental Appropriations Act, FY2003. Chapter 8 of that act provides $11 million for the Homeland Security Committee, to be available through December 31, 2004. The effect of this action is to reduce the amount that must be provided later in the FY2004 and FY2005 legislative branch appropriations acts to defray House committee operating expenses. H.Res. 148, as reported by the House Administration Committee, did not contain funds (although the original resolution did) for the Homeland Security Committee. It is expected that the House will consider later a resolution (H.Res. 110) authorizing funds for the Homeland Security Committee, in the wake of action in the supplemental appropriations act. The Senate agreed by unanimous consent to the omnibus funding resolution (S.Res. 66) for its covered committees on February 27, 2003. On January 15, 2003, the Senate reached an agreement ending an impasse in electing committees by agreeing to allot committee staff proportionately between the two parties. Excluded from this allocation were administrative staff appointed by a committee chair which both parties agreed served all members. CRS-2 All standing and select committees of both chambers of Congress (except for both Appropriations Committees and the Senate Ethics Committee) obtain their operating budgets pursuant to a biennial committee funding resolution. Often, House action on these funding resolutions is controversial, because of disputes over the allocation of staff positions on committees between the majority and minority parties. Senate action is normally less contentious because there are stronger guarantees in Senate rules providing at least one-third of committee staff and funds to the minority. Many Members in both chambers criticize funding recommendations that significantly exceed the rate of inflation. Some Members may oppose providing funds to particular committees to support committee inquiries with which these Members disagree. Committee Funding in the 107th Congress In the 107th Congress, the House reached an accommodation satisfactory to both parties which, by 2002, gave minority members on nearly all panels financed through the House funding process one-third of the committee staff positions. Under House Rules, the minority is guaranteed one-third of the first 30 staff positions authorized for a committee, but is not entitled to such a proportion of any additional staff positions. On March 27, 2001, the House adopted the biennial funding resolution, H.Res. 84, by a vote of 357-61, the largest margin of support for a funding resolution since the chamber began to consider omnibus funding resolutions in 1981. Senate action on its committee funding for the 107th Congress was modified as a result of the powersharing agreement established by S.Res. 8 of January 5, 2001. This agreement assures Republicans and Democrats of equal staffing resources on all committees. Excluded from this equal division of staff are administrative personnel who serve both parties and who are to be appointed by the committee chairman in consultation with the ranking minority member. Despite some delays in its normal timetable, the Senate, on March 8, 2001, agreed to a biennial funding resolution by unanimous consent. House Floor Action in 108th Congress On May 6, 2003, the House agreed to a unanimous consent request by Representative John Linder to provide for the consideration of H.Res. 148, the omnibus funding resolution, at any time on May 7, 2003. Under the agreement, the resolution will be considered for one hour, with time equally divided between the chairman and ranking minority member, and the committee-reported amendment in the nature of a substitute will be considered as adopted, thereby simplifying House floor consideration. As in previous Congresses, a major concern in the House committee funding process will be whether each committee has provided its minority party members with least one-third of the committee’s staff and funds. The continued bipartisan support for the funding process evident two years ago may hinge on whether all committees are now fully compliant with the two-thirds/one-third allocation. CRS-3 There may also be concern about the increasing costs of committee operations since 1995, when the House cuts its committee staff size by one-third. The newly established Select Committee on Homeland Security has requested $11 million for its operations in the 108th Congress, and an $11 million appropriation for the select committee was provided in P.L. 108-11, the Emergency Wartime Supplemental Appropriations Act. There has been concern about providing funds for this committee, and for accommodating requested funding increases for other panels, while retaining reasonable control over the rising costs of committee operations. House committees have requested $252 million, an increase of nearly $50 million from the amount approved in the 107th Congress.1 The House normally acts on committee funding resolutions during the last week of March in the first year of a Congress. The committee funding resolution is normally called up as privileged business under the Rules of the House, allowing it to be called up and considered without the need for a special rule from the Rules Committee. Privileged funding resolutions are considered in the House under the one-hour rule and, typically, the majority party manager does not yield the floor to permit amendments to be offered. (The committee-reported amendment is automatically laid before the House.) At the end of one hour of debate, the majority party manager moves the previous question and, if agreed to, the House votes on final passage of the resolution. Before the vote on final passage, it has become customary for the minority party to offer a motion to recommit the funding resolution. This motion normally permits the minority to offer an alternative funding proposal and to obtain a House vote on it. Owing to the bipartisan consensus on the 107th Congress funding resolution, House Democrats did not offer such a motion in 2001. Although House floor action on funding resolutions typically occur in the latter half of March, unforeseen delays made it impossible for the House and the administration committee to complete action. Instead, Representative Ney, the chairman of the House Administration Committee, introduced on March 26, 2003, and obtained consideration and approval by unanimous consent of a short-term funding extension (H.Res. 163) continuing committee funding up through April 11, 2003. The resolution was agreed to by unanimous consent. When action could not be completed within that deadline, the House by unanimous consent agreed on April 9, 2003, to H.Res. 185, continuing funding up through May 9, 2003. House Committee Action Each committee is encouraged to discuss its proposed budget and approve it at a committee organization meeting, although some committees do not prepare or approve their draft budgets this way. Each committee chair normally introduces a House resolution to provide the committee with the requisite funds for the two years of the Congress. These individual resolutions are then referred to the House Administration Committee, which holds public hearings on each committee’s request receiving testimony from committee chairs and the ranking minority members. The 1 Suzanne Nelson, “House Admin to Seek Second CR to Fund Committees,” Roll Call (internet edition), Apr. 10, 2003 [http://www.rollcall.com/issues/48_81/news/1222-1.html]. CRS-4 House Administration Committee held hearings on committee requests on March 13 and 14, 2003. The chair of the House Administration Committee then typically introduces an omnibus funding resolution, which, after its referral to the House Administration Committee, generally serves as the legislative vehicle for a full committee markup. Representative Ney, chairman of the House Administration Committee, introduced such a resolution (H.Res. 148) on March 18, 2003.2 His resolution incorporates, without change, the amounts requested by each committee. At the House Administration Committee markup, the chair typically offers an amendment in the nature of a substitute modifying (usually reducing) the amounts requested by each committee. The markup may feature consideration of additional amendments, concluded with a vote to approve the resolution as amended. The measure is then reported to the House, and a written report is issued to accompany the resolution. Depending upon the degree of controversy surrounding the funding process, minority, additional, or supplemental written views may be included in the committee report. On May 6, the House Administration Committee held a markup session, and agreed to an amendment in the nature of a substitute submitted by Chairman Ney. H.Res. 148 was then reported to the House by voice vote. House Funding Procedures and Issues House Rules establish guidelines for committees in drafting budget requests and in administering committee funds. The authority of the House Administration Committee in reviewing budget requests and overseeing the disbursement of committee funds are also prescribed in House Rules. Under House Rule X, clause 6, each standing and select committee of the House (except the Appropriations Committee) is required to submit an operating budget request for necessary expenses over the two-year span of a Congress. The budgetary requests include estimated salary needs for staff, costs of consulting services, printing costs, office equipment and supply costs, and travel costs for committee members and staff. Some costs (such as pension and insurance contributions for committee employees) are not directly billed to the committee, and are paid from other appropriated funds. Individual committee requests are then packaged by the House Administration Committee into an omnibus “primary expense resolution.” Clause 6(c) requires that “the minority party (be) treated fairly in the appointment” of committee staff employed pursuant to such expense resolutions. Prior to the 104th Congress, House rules provided a base level of 30 so-called “statutory” staff positions for all House standing committees (except the Appropriations Committee). Funds for these staff were provided through a line-item appropriation and were not included in the funding resolutions reported from the 2 On Mar. 17, Chairman Ney had introduced an earlier omnibus funding resolution, H. Res. 146. The two resolutions are identical, except that the latter resolution, H.Res. 148, provides an additional $153,795 over two years for the Small Business Committee which had requested the additional amount in a revised request. CRS-5 House Administration Committee. In the 104th Congress, House rules were changed (1) to provide for biennial committee funding resolutions, and (2) to include funding authorization for the baseline 30 staff positions (now called “professional staff”) in each committee’s funding authorization. (As before, these provisions were not made applicable to the House Appropriations Committee.) Twenty of these staff positions are allotted to the committee majority and 10 to the committee minority. The House majority leadership has encouraged its committee leaders to move as quickly as possible to provide the minority with one-third of the remaining committee staff and resources authorized in the biennial funding resolutions. Previously, there have been disputes about the interpretation of funding and staffing guidelines for the minority. Some committees have considered as equitable the apportionment of one-third of staff salary funds, while others have considered the one-third standard to apply to the number of staff positions regardless of salary. Some committees have said that those administrative staff providing services to both parties should be excluded from the minority-majority staff allocation, although most such administrative staff may have been majority party staff designees. There are also still disparities among committees on the allocation to the minority of office space, travel funds, and office equipment. Nevertheless, both parties seem to agree that, since the 103rd Congress, the minority party has been treated more equitably than before in the allocation of House committee staff and resources. Remaining disputes between the parties now focus on the speed with which all committees achieve, or plan to achieve, this one-third standard. In recent Congresses, the House Administration Committee has sometimes included an authorization for a “reserve fund” in its omnibus funding resolution. With the approval of the House Administration Committee, money in this fund could be released to committees that encountered unexpected funding needs during a Congress. The use of the reserve fund was controversial because the House did not have to approve its use. For the 107th Congress, however, no reserve fund was included in the funding resolution. Committee funding resolutions include requests from committees to employ consultants and to arrange for the services of executive branch staff detailed to the committee. The House Administration Committee approves consulting contracts and staff details for all House committees (except for the Appropriations Committee). Although consultant contract fees are paid from committee budgets, House committees are not required to reimburse a federal agency for the salary and benefits cost of detailed staff. The House Administration Committee also has authority to approve so-called shared staffing arrangements (except those involving the Appropriations Committee) through which committee staffs are paid partly from committee funds and partly through Members’ personal staffing funds. Senate Committee Funding Action, 108th Congress The Senate, for the second Congress in a row, adopted ad hoc procedures in approving committee operating budgets. With the Senate divided 51-48-1 at the beginning of the 108th Congress, Senate Democrats argued for a proportional allocation of committee staff between the parties. Democratic Senators threatened CRS-6 to filibuster any resolution offered to elect Senators to committees unless an agreement was reached first on the partisan allocation of committee staff. On January 15, after a week-long delay in the appointment of Senate committees, a unanimous consent agreement was reached providing for the proportional allocation of staff and office space between the parties on each committee, with a separate provision that allowed the committee chair the authority to control up to 10% of the committee budget for the employment of administrative staff serving both parties. The full text of the Joint Leadership Letter agreement, signed by Senators Bill Frist (Majority Leader), Ted Stevens, Trent Lott, Thomas A. Daschle (Democratic Leader), Robert C. Byrd, and Christopher J. Dodd, follows: We mutually commit to the following for only the 108th Congress: The budgets of the Committees of the Senate, including Joint and Special Committees, and all other subgroups, shall be apportioned to reflect the ratio of the Senate as of this date, with up to an additional ten percent to be allocated to Chairmen for administrative expenses, to be determined by the Rules committee (sic), with the total administrative expense allocation for all committees not to exceed historic levels. The additional administrative expenses described above shall be available to be expended by a Committee Chairman, after consultation with the Ranking Member of the Committee. Funds for committee expenses shall be available to Chairmen consistent with Senate rules and practices of the 107th Congress. No committee budget shall be allocated to reduce the democratic (sic) staff salary baseline from that of fiscal year 2002 (including COLA), as adjusted by approved COLAs for fiscal year 2003 and fiscal year 2004. The Chairman and Ranking Member of any committee may, by mutual agreement, modify the apportionment of Committee funding referenced in this letter. The division of Committee office space shall be commensurate with this funding agreement.3 Due to this formal agreement, consideration of committee funding requests by the Senate Rules and Administration Committee was routine. On February 26, Senators Lott and Dodd, the chair and ranking minority member of the Senate Rules and Administration Committee, introduced S. Res. 66, providing funds for Senate committees, except for the Appropriations Committee, through February 28, 2005. The next day, the Senate agreed to the resolution by unanimous consent. S.Res. 66 provided funds at the level requested by each Senate committee, except for the Foreign Relations Committee. The request of the Foreign Relations Committee included funds for a proposed policy advisory group. The group is to be comprised largely of outside advisors who would be reimbursed for the cost of their periodic travel to Washington, DC. It was the view of the Rules and Administration Committee that a waiver from the Senate Ethics Committee would be necessary for this group to function, but the Ethics Committee could not provide such a waiver within the deadlines of the funding process. Consequently, funds for this group were 3 Congressional Record, (daily electronic edition) vol. 149, Jan. 15, 2003, pp. S842-S843. CRS-7 deleted from the Foreign Relations Committee funds, with the understanding that such funds might be provided later, if the necessary waivers were obtained. Senate Committee Funding Rules Although the Senate has, for the second Congress in a row, followed ad hoc procedures in determining committee operating budgets and the allocation of staff positions and other resources among its committees, there are formal provisions in Senate Rules governing the funding process. This section describes these rules that will apply in future Congresses, unless the rules are amended or again set aside by unanimous consent. The Senate biennial committee funding process applies to all Senate committees, except Appropriations and Ethics, which have permanent authorizations for their staff and operating expenses. The Senate Committee on Rules and Administration has jurisdiction over committee funding resolutions, and also issues directives governing committee funding and staff. Committee funding and staff are also regulated by Senate rules, especially Rule XXVI, paragraph 9, and Rule XXVII, as well as by statute. The funds authorized by resolution are appropriated in legislative branch appropriations acts. Soon after a new Congress convenes, generally by January 31 of the first session, each Senate committee (except Appropriations and Ethics) requests funds for two years. The formal request comes as a Senate resolution introduced by the chair of each committee, after formal review of the request by all committee members; the various resolutions are referred to the Rules and Administration Committee. Each committee supports its request by submitting supplementary materials, including those specified by the Rules and Administration Committee. In recent Congresses, that panel has advised committees on the permissible increase, or required decrease, it hopes to impose on Senate committees, compared to the funding level in the previous Congress. Committees requesting funds in excess of these guidelines have been asked to include a justification in their budget submissions. The Rules and Administration Committee may then hold hearings, during which committee leaders testify on their budget requests, although in recent Congresses, testimony from some or all committees has been omitted in the interest of time. The Rules and Administration Committee chair will normally introduce an omnibus resolution incorporating the amounts requested by each of the Senate committees in their individual resolutions. The Rules and Administration Committee will then usually meet to markup the resolution and, after final approval by the committee, report it to the Senate and issue an accompanying written report. On occasions when both parties have been in agreement on the funding resolution, it has been discharged by unanimous consent from the committee without a formal markup or written report (this was the case in the 107th and 108th Congresses). The Senate then considers the funding resolution under normal Senate rules and procedures, although in recent Congresses, the Senate has agreed to the funding resolution by unanimous consent without much, if any, floor discussion. CRS-8 If a committee requires additional funds after the omnibus resolution has been adopted, it may request these funds in the same way it did for its two-year budget. The Senate has minimized the need for supplemental funding, however, by allowing committees to use unspent funds from one period specified in the omnibus resolution during the next funding period.4 Since 1999, the omnibus funding resolution has contained a special reserve from which unexpected funding needs by any Senate committee could be met, upon the request of its chair and ranking member, and with the approval of the chair and ranking member of the Rules and Administration Committee. Senate Rule XXVII requires that each committee’s staff “should reflect the relative number of majority and minority members of committees” and that the minority receive “fair consideration” in the appointment of staff. A majority of the minority party members of a committee may request at least one-third of the personnel funds for hiring minority staff. This ratio is calculated after excluding funds for staff, if any, who perform administrative and clerical functions for the committee as a whole, as agreed to by the chair and ranking minority member. In the 107th and 108th Congresses, the Senate set aside these provisions, authorizing an equal allocation of staff between the parties in the 107th Congress, and a proportional allocation of staff in the 108th Congress. In both instances, the agreements were entered into only for the Congress then underway. In both instances as well, the agreement authorized the exclusion from the partisan staff calculations of administrative staff performing services for the committee as a whole. Committee staff may also be supplemented by consultants and staff detailed to the committee from federal agencies. Such staff arrangements are subject to regulations that may be imposed by the Committee on Rules and Administration. 4 The Senate funding resolutions provide funds for three specific calendar periods—from Mar. 1 to Sept. 30 of the first year of a Congress, from Oct. 1 to Sept. 30 of the following year, and from Oct. 1 to the following Feb. 28. This permits the Senate to identify more precisely the amounts authorized for each fiscal year and the subsequent appropriations required. CRS-9 Table 1. House Committee Funding, Committee Requests and House Administration Committee Recommendations, 108th Congress Committees Agriculture Armed Services Budget Education & Workforce Energy & Commerce Financial Services Government Reform House Administration International Relations Judiciary Resources Rules Science Small Business Standards Transportation & Infrastructure Veterans’ Affairs Ways and Means Permanent Select Intelligence Select Homeland Security Totals 108th Congress Request 1st session $5,292,225 $5,943,675 $5,894,018 $7,398,237 $9,385,902 $8,144,280 $10,000,000 $5,028,573 $7,693,249 $8,422,720 $7,360,564 $2,816,332 $6,072,465 $3,080,591 $1,636,825 $8,722,428 $3,225,344 $8,063,151 $3,773,567 $5,657,656 $123,611,802 2nd session $5,331,415 $6,434,005 $5,975,554 $7,523,946 $9,731,721 $8,851,207 $10,400,000 $5,346,401 $8,344,746 $8,825,346 $7,549,963 $2,852,979 $6,224,225 $3,291,417 $1,806,325 $8,960,077 $3,551,273 $8,458,168 $4,036,163 $5,371,131 $128,866,063 Total Request $10,623,640 $12,377,680 $11,869,572 $14,922,183 $19,117,623 $16,995,487 $20,400,000 $10,374,974 $16,037,995 $17,248,066 $14,910,527 $5,669,311 $12,296,690 $6,372,008 $3,443,150 $17,682,505 $6,776,617 $16,521,319 $7,809,730 $11,028,787 $252,477,865 Reported by House Administration 1st session $5,084,900 $5,871,876 $5,856,333 $7,047,896 $9,101,042 $6,601,085 $9,740,963 $4,122,092 $6,993,645 $6,957,554 $6,492,029 $2,797,898 $5,711,401 $2,535,261 $1,527,825 $7,982,558 $2,703,328 $7,828,037 $3,780,487 $5,366,866 $124,272,876 2nd session $5,242,632 $6,059,481 $6,013,239 $7,625,475 $9,521,097 $7,095,402 $9,873,472 $4,404,965 $7,559,050 $7,091,062 $7,017,395 $2,871,413 $5,979,444 $2,585,041 $1,543,425 $8,479,334 $2,783,466 $8,148,251 $4,029,243 $5,585,921 $129,994,072 Total Markup $10,327,531 $11,931,357 $11,869,572 $14,673,371 $18,622,138 $13,696,487 $19,614,435 $8,527,057 $14,552,695 $14,048,616 $13,509,424 $5,669,311 $11,690,845 $5,120,301 $3,071,250 $16,461,893 $5,486,795 $15,976,288 $7,809,730 $10,952,787 $233,611,883 Difference % of Request -$296,109 -$446,323 $0 -$248,812 -$495,485 -$3,299,000 -$785,565 -$1,847,917 -$1,485,300 -$3,199,451 -$1,401,103 $0 -$605,845 -$1,251,707 -$371,900 -$1,220,612 -$1,289,822 -$545,031 $0 -$76,000 -$18,865,982 97.21 96.39 100.00% 98.33% 97.41% 80.59% 96.15% 82.19% 90.74% 81.45% 90.60% 100.00% 95.07% 80.36% 89.20% 93.10% 80.97% 96.70% 100.00% 99.31% 92.53% Source: Data taken from committee funding resolutions for the 108th Congress. Note: Adding first and second session amounts for committees may not yield full Congress total because of rounding. Funds recommended for the Homeland Security Committee are contained in H.Res. 110, as reported. CRS-10 Table 2. House Committee Funding, 105th Congress-107th Congress Committees Agriculture Armed Services Banking Budget Commerce Education and the Workforce Energy and Commerce Financial Services Government Reform House Administration International Relations Judiciary Resources Rules Science Small Business Standards Transportation and Infrastructure Veterans’ Affairs Ways and Means Permanent Select Intelligence Reserve Fund Totals 105th Congress $7,656,162 $9,721,745 $8,901,617 $9,940,000 $14,535,406 $10,125,113 --$20,020,572 $6,050,349 $10,368,358 $10,604,041 $9,876,550 $4,649,102 $8,677,830 $3,906,941 $2,456,300 $12,184,459 $4,344,160 $11,036,907 $4,815,526 $7,000,000 $176,871,138 106th Congress $8,414,033 $10,342,681 $9,307,521 $9,940,000 $15,285,113 $11,200,497 --$19,770,233 $6,251,871 $11,313,531 $12,152,275 $10,567,908 $5,069,424 $8,931,726 $4,148,880 $2,632,915 $13,220,138 $4,735,135 $11,930,338 $5,164,444 $3,000,000 $183,378,663 107th Congress $9,607,006 $10,872,677 -$11,107,043 -$13,573,886 $17,226,770 $11,846,231 $19,420,233 $7,418,045 $12,672,626 $13,166,463 $11,601,260 $5,370,773 $10,628,041 $4,798,783 $2,871,091 $14,479,551 $5,142,263 $14,748,888 $6,955,074 -$203,506,704 Source: Data taken from committee funding resolutions for the particular Congresses. Renamed committees are listed according to their current names. For the 107th Congress, the renamed Committee on Financial Services and Committee on Energy and Commerce are listed according to their new names, but the committees appear as Committee on Banking and the Committee on Commerce in earlier Congresses. CRS-11 Table 3. Senate Committee Funding, Committee Requests and Funding Approved by the Senate, 108th Congress 108th Congress Request Committees 108th Congress Approved % of Request 03/01/0309/30/03 10/01/0309/30/04 10/01/0402/28/05 Total Request 03/01/0309/30/03 10/01/0309/30/04 Agriculture, Nutrition and Forestry $1,949,860 $3,431,602 $1,462,700 $6,844,162 $1,949,860 $3,431,602 $1,462,700 $6,844,162 $0 100.00% Armed Services $3,594,172 $6,328,829 $2,698,836 $12,621,837 $3,594,172 $6,328,829 $2,698,836 $12,621,837 $0 100.00% Banking, Housing and Urban Affairs $2,979,871 $5,244,760 $2,235,697 $10,460,328 $2,979,871 $5,244,760 $2,235,697 $10,460,328 $0 100.00% Budget $3,136,108 $5,522,410 $2,355,010 $11,013,528 $3,136,108 $5,522,410 $2,355,010 $11,013,528 $0 100.00% Commerce, Science and Transportation $3,227,950 $5,681,955 $2,422,263 $11,332,168 $3,227,950 $5,681,955 $2,422,263 $11,332,168 $0 100.00% Energy and Natural Resources $2,724,301 $4,795,783 $2,044,614 $9,564,698 $2,724,301 $4,795,783 $2,044,614 $9,564,698 $0 100.00% Environment and Public Works $2,516,590 $4,427,783 $1,886,876 $8,831,249 $2,516,590 $4,427,783 $1,886,876 $8,831,249 $0 100.00% Finance $3,511,241 $6,179,693 $2,634,121 $12,325,055 $3,511,241 $6,179,693 $2,634,121 $12,325,055 $0 100.00% Foreign Relations $2,933,624 $5,163,940 $2,201,453 $10,299,017 $2,516,590 $4,427,783 $1,886,876 Governmental Affairs $4,764,738 $8,387,779 $3,576,035 $16,728,552 $4,764,738 $8,387,779 $3,576,035 $16,728,552 $0 100.00% Health, Education, Labor and Pensions $4,236,427 $7,457,494 $3,179,327 $14,873,248 $4,236,427 $7,457,494 $3,179,327 $14,873,248 $0 100.00% Judiciary $4,605,727 $8,110,222 $3,548,551 $16,264,500 $4,605,727 $8,110,222 $3,548,551 $16,264,500 $0 100.00% Rules and Administration $1,288,413 $2,269,014 $967,696 $4,525,123 $1,288,413 $2,269,014 $967,696 $4,525,123 $0 100.00% Small Business and Entrepreneurship $1,215,913 $2,139,332 $911,668 $4,266,913 $1,215,913 $2,139,332 $911,668 $4,266,913 $0 100.00% Veterans’ Affairs $1,112,475 $1,958,451 $834,987 $3,905,913 $1,112,475 $1,958,451 $834,987 $3,905,913 $0 100.00% Special Committee on Aging $1,347,927 $2,372,258 $1,011,165 $4,731,350 $1,347,927 $2,372,258 $1,011,165 $4,731,350 $0 100.00% Select Committee on Indian Affairs $1,051,310 $1,848,350 $787,173 $3,686,833 $1,051,310 $1,848,350 $787,173 $3,686,833 $0 100.00% Select Committee on Intelligence $2,117,309 $3,726,412 $1,588,401 $7,432,122 $2,117,309 $3,726,412 $1,588,401 $7,432,122 $0 100.00% $3,500,000 $6,000,000 $2,500,000 $12,000,000 -- -- $48,313,956 $85,046,067 $36,346,573 $169,706,596 $51,396,922 $90,309,910 $38,531,996 $180,238,828 -- -- Reserve Fund Totals -- -- -- -- 10/01/0402/28/05 Difference Total Approved $8,831,249 -$1,467,768 85.75% CRS-12 Table 4. Senate Committee Funding, 105th Congress-108th Congress Committees Agriculture, Nutrition and Forestry Armed Services Banking, Housing and Urban Affairs Budget Commerce, Science and Transportation Energy and Natural Resources Environment and Public Works Finance Foreign Relations Governmental Affairs Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Judiciary Rules and Administration Small Business and Entrepreneurship Veterans’ Affairs Special Committee on Aging Select Committee on Indian Affairs Select Committee on Intelligence Reserve Fund Totals 105th Congress 106th Congress 107th Congress 108th Congress $3,598,024 $5,572,267 $5,877,053 $6,400,221 $7,103,272 $5,434,380 $5,005,429 $6,234,894 $5,585,034 $9,339,400 $8,474,547 $8,991,557 $3,210,626 $2,233,252 $2,314,620 $2,333,851 $2,352,126 $4,358,289 -- $4,113,664 $7,057,623 $6,293,483 $6,867,541 $7,612,541 $5,823,795 $5,352,675 $7,259,701 $6,203,527 $10,008,362 $9,080,958 $9,646,900 $3,281,000 $2,576,258 $2,481,210 $2,790,721 $2,510,237 $5,140,893 $5,300,000 $6,336,830 $11,667,484 $9,682,615 $10,179,861 $10,486,514 $8,848,874 $8,183,420 $11,410,443 $8,816,468 $15,476,219 $13,761,217 $14,950,488 $4,181,297 $3,953,863 $3,613,148 $4,380,565 $3,423,982 $6,565,171 $7,300,000 $6,844,162 $12,621,837 $10,460,328 $11,013,528 $11,332,168 $9,564,698 $8,831,249 $12,325,055 $8,831,249 $16,728,552 $14,873,248 $16,264,500 $4,525,123 $4,266,913 $3,905,913 $4,731,350 $3,686,833 $7,432,122 $12,000,000 $94,418,842 $109,401,089 $163,218,459 $180,238,828 Source: Data taken from committee funding resolutions for the particular Congress. Renamed committees are listed according to their current names. The reserve fund was first authorized in the 105th Congress, but itemized amounts for it were not included in the funding resolution until the 106th Congress.