Iraq: Summary of U.S. Forces

Order Code RL31763 CRS Report for Congress Received through the CRS Web Iraq: Summary of U.S. Forces Updated November 28, 2005 Linwood B. Carter Information Research Specialist Knowledge Services Group Congressional Research Service ˜ The Library of Congress Iraq: Summary of U.S. Forces Summary This report provides a summary estimate of military forces reported to have been deployed to and subsequently withdrawn from the U.S. Central Command (USCENTCOM) Area of Responsibility (AOR), popularly called the Persian Gulf region, to support Operation Iraqi Freedom. For background information on the AOR, see [http://www.centcom.mil/aboutus/aor.htm]. Geographically, the USCENTCOM AOR stretches from the Horn of Africa to Central Asia. The information about military units that have been deployed and withdrawn is based on both official government public statements and estimates identified in selected news accounts. The statistics have been assembled from both Department of Defense (DOD) sources and open-source press reports. However, due to concerns about operational security, DOD is not routinely reporting the composition, size, or destination of units and military forces being deployed to the Persian Gulf. Consequently, not all the data herein have been officially confirmed. For further information, see CRS Report RL31701, Iraq: U.S. Military Operations, by Steve Bowman. This report will be updated as the situation continues to develop. Contents U.S. Forces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Military Units: Deployed/En Route/On Deployment Alert . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Operation Iraqi Freedom Force Rotations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Army . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Navy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Support Ship . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 USS Theodore Roosevelt Carrier Strike Group . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Marine Corps . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Amphibious Task Force East . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Amphibious Task Force West . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Expeditionary Strike Groups (ESG) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Air Force . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Coast Guard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 List of Tables Table 1. Operation Iraqi Freedom Active Duty Force Levels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Table 2. Operation Iraqi Freedom Reserve Component Force Levels . . . . . . . . . . 2 Table 3. Operation Iraqi Freedom Ground Troop Rotations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Table 4. Operation Iraqi Freedom 4 Rotational Units . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Table 5. Operation Iraqi Freedom 5 Rotational Units . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Table 6. Major Army Units Deployed or Alerted . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Table 7. USS Theodore Roosevelt Carrier Strike Group . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Table 8. Marine Corps Personnel Deployed or Alerted . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Table 9. USS Tarawa Expeditionary Strike Group . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Table 10. Air Force Units . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Table 11. Coast Guard Personnel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Table 12. Coast Guard Cutters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Iraq: Summary of U.S. Forces U.S. Forces Military Units: Deployed/En Route/On Deployment Alert Since December 2002 when the Department of Defense (DOD) began announcing the first deployments of military units to the Persian Gulf region, U.S. forces reported to be currently deployed include the following: Army — one airborne corps, one airborne division, three infantry brigades, two armored brigades, two armored cavalry regiments, one brigade combat team, and one field artillery brigade Navy — one carrier strike group, one expeditionary strike group Marine Corps — two expeditionary forces, one expeditionary unit Air Force — elements of 10 fighter, fighter/bomber, specialized, and support wings Coast Guard — six Coast Guard cutters and elements of Port Security Units As of November 21, 2005, according to DOD officials, approximately 199,400 U.S. forces were within the borders of Iraq and the surrounding region, and 157,982 troops were within the borders of Iraq only supporting Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF). As of that date, there were 108,964 active duty (see Table 1), 35,109 National Guard, and 13,909 Reserve forces (see Table 2) deployed in Iraq.1 Also, approximately 23,000 non-U.S. coalition forces from 27 countries are in Iraq contributing to stabilization operations.2 Table 1. Operation Iraqi Freedom Active Duty Force Levels Branch of Service Army Navy Air Force Marine Corps Total 1 2 Troop Numbers 78,490 2,315 7,559 20,600 108,964 Office of the Chairman Joint Chiefs of Staff, Legislative Affairs, Nov. 21, 2005. Non-U.S. Forces in Iraq at [http://www.globalsecurity.org/military/ops/iraq_orbat_ coalition.htm] and Multi-National Force-Iraq at [http://www.mnf-iraq.com/coalition.htm]. CRS-2 Table 2. Operation Iraqi Freedom Reserve Component Force Levels Branch of Service Army National Guard Air National Guard Army Reserve Air Force Reserve Navy Reserve Marine Corps Reserve Total Troop Numbers 34,662 447 10,320 665 650 2,274 49,018 A report prepared by the staff of the U.S. Central Command, Combined Forces Air Component Commander, indicates that as of April 30, 2003, there were 466,985 total personnel deployed for Operation Iraqi Freedom.3 This includes USAF, 54,955; USAF Reserve, 2,084; USAF National Guard, 7,207; USMC, 74,405; USMC Reserve, 9,501; USN, 61,296 (681 are members of the U.S. Coast Guard); USN Reserve, 2,056; and USA, 233,342; USA Reserve, 10,683; and USA National Guard, 8,866. Operation Iraqi Freedom Force Rotations Secretary of Defense Donald H. Rumsfeld announced on November 7, 2005, that approximately 92,000 military personnel from eight major units, 65,000 from active duty and 26,000 from the reserve component, will deploy to Iraq in support of the Operation Iraqi Freedom 5 (OIF 5) troop rotation (see Table 5).4 The transition of the OIF 5 units will begin in mid-2006. Commencing on December 14, 2004, and continuing on January 4 and January 18, 2005, DOD announced the Operation Iraqi Freedom 4 (OIF 4) troop rotational units (see Table 4). At a hearing held by the House Committee on Armed Services on July 7, 2004, DOD officials announced the troops rotation plan for Operation Iraqi Freedom 3 (OIF 3). OIF 3 commenced in July 2004 with the stated goal of flowing new active and reserve forces into the Iraqi theater of operations for up to 12-month rotations, and eventually reducing U.S. force levels in Iraq from 140,000 to approximately 130,000. According to slides presented at the hearing, units from Operation Iraqi Freedom 2 (OIF 2 or units currently stationed in Iraq) will transition out, and units activated for OIF 3 will deploy to Iraq commencing in July 2004 (see Table 3). Also, on May 17, 2004, DOD announced that approximately 3,600 members of the 2nd Brigade of the 2nd Infantry Division will deploy from the Republic of Korea to Iraq in mid-summer 2004.5 3 “Operation Iraqi Freedom — By the Numbers,” U.S. Central Air Forces, Assessment and Analysis Division, Apr. 30, 2003, p. 3. 4 Department of Defense, American Forces Information Service news article, Nov. 7, 2005. 5 Department of Defense, American Forces Information Service news article, May 17, 2004. CRS-3 Table 3. Operation Iraqi Freedom Ground Troop Rotations OIF 2 OIF 3 Transition period Stryker Brigade Stryker Brigade November 2004 1st Infantry Division 42nd Infantry Division (NY) December 2004February 2005 I Marine Expeditionary Force Marine Expeditionary Force March 2005 st rd 1 Cavalry Division 3 Infantry Division November 2004March 2005 1st Armored Division 2nd Brigade, 10th Mountain Division July 2004 2nd Light Cavalry Regiment 11th Marine Expeditionary Unit 24th Marine Expeditionary Unit 155th Armored Brigade (MS) July 2004 July 2004 February 2005 81st Brigade 29th Brigade (National Guard, HI) 3rd Armored Cavalry Regiment March 2005 March 2005 Source: U. S. Congress, House Committee on Armed Services, Hearing on Troop Rotations For Operation Iraqi Freedom 3 and Operation Enduring Freedom 6 and the Army’s Mobilization of the Individual Ready Reserve, July 7, 2004, Prepared Statement of Lieutenant General Norton A. Schwartz, Briefing Slide, “Ground Troop Rotation Plan Operation Iraqi Freedom.” This document is available online from the House Armed Services Committee at [http://armedservices.house.gov/ openingstatementsandpressreleases/108thcongress/04-07-07schwartz.pdf]. Table 4. Operation Iraqi Freedom 4 Rotational Units Military Unit Home Military Base Transition period XVIII Airborne Corps Fort Bragg, NC February 2005 V Corps Heidelberg, Germany early 2006 42nd Infantry Division (Mechanized), New York National Guard Troy, NY February 2005 11th Armored Calvary Regiment Fort Irwin, CA February 2005 2nd Marine Expeditionary Force Camp Lejeune, NC February 2005 3rd Marine Air Wing Miramar Naval Air Station, CA February 2005 3rd Infantry Division (Mechanized) Fort Stewart, GA February 2005 48th Infantry Brigade (Separate), Georgia Army National Guard Macon, GA mid-2005 29th Infantry Brigade Combat Team, Hawaii National Guard Kalaeloa, HI February 2005 CRS-4 Military Unit Home Military Base Transition period 172nd Stryker Brigade Combat Team Fort Wainwright, AK mid-2005 1st Brigade, 10th Mountain Division Fort Drum, NY mid-2005 101st Airborne Division, Air Assault (division Headquarters and 4 Brigades) Fort Campbell, KY mid-2005 1st Brigade, 1st Infantry Division Fort Riley, KS mid-2005 4th Infantry Division (division Headquarters and 4 Brigades) Fort Hood, TX mid-2005 2nd Brigade Combat Team, 28th Infantry Division, Pennsylvania Army National Guard Washington, PA mid-2005 1st and 2nd Brigades, U.S. Army 1st Armored Division Wiesbaden, Germany mid-2005 Source: DOD News Releases, Dec. 14, 2004, and Jan. 4 , Jan. 18, Feb. 11, Feb. 15, 2005. Table 5. Operation Iraqi Freedom 5 Rotational Units Military Unit Home Military Base Transition period Division Headquarters, 25th Infantry Division Schofield Barracks, HI mid-2006 13th Corps Support Command Fort Hood, TX mid-2006 1st Brigade, 34th Infantry Division, Minnesota Army National Guard Stillwater, MN mid-2006 2nd Brigade, 1st Infantry Division Schweinfurt, Germany mid-2006 3rd Brigade, 2nd Infantry Division Fort Lewis, WA mid-2006 3rd Brigade, 82nd Airborne Division Fort Bragg, NC mid-2006 3rd Brigade, 25th Infantry Division Schofield Barracks, HI mid-2006 2nd Brigade, 10th Mountain Division Fort Drum, NY mid-2006 Source: DOD News Release, Nov. 7, 2005. CRS-5 On January 14, 2004, the USS Boxer6 (LHD 4) deployed from San Diego, CA, and on January 19, 2004, the USS Bataan7 (LHD 5) deployed from Norfolk, VA. The mission of both ships was to provide amphibious lift and logistical support for the OIF 2 force rotation. Both ships completed their OIF 2 troop rotation support missions. The USS Boxer on April 29, 2004, returned to its homeport in San Diego, CA; and the USS Bataan on March 31, 2004, returned to its Norfolk, VA, homeport. Army Mechanized infantry divisions have 17,000 personnel consisting of three maneuver brigades (a brigade is 5,000 soldiers) that comprise five tank battalions (a battalion is 1,000 soldiers) and five mechanized infantry battalions.8 Armored divisions consist of 17, 000 personnel and are similar in organization and equipment to a mechanized division, however, the three maneuver brigades have six tank battalions and four mechanized infantry battalions.9 These numbers are approximate. Army divisions generally deploy with additional support units not included in division counts. Armored cavalry regiments are comparable in size to a brigade (approximately 4,000 personnel) and are composed of three armored cavalry squadrons (a squadron is 1,000 soldiers) and one air cavalry troop (a troop is 190 soldiers).10 A corps is a deployable command of approximately 20,000 to 45,000 soldiers.11 Table 6. Major Army Units Deployed or Alerted Military Unit st th 1 Brigade, 25 Infantry Division nd th 2 Brigade, 25 Infantry Division th 10 Mountain Division (selected units) nd 2 Armored Cavalry Regiment th 11 Armored Cavalry Regiment Number of Personnel Home Military Base 4,000 Fort Lewis,WA 4,000 Schofield Barracks, HI 3,650 Fort Drum, NY 3,700 Fort Polk, LA 1,500 Fort Irwin, CA 6 “USS Boxer to Deploy in Support of Global War on Terrorism,” Navy Newsstand, Jan. 8, 2004. 7 “USS Bataan to Deploy in Support of OIF Force Rotation,” Navy Newsstand, Jan. 13, 2004. 8 This information comes from archived CRS Report 91-167, Persian Gulf War: Summary of U.S. and Non-U.S. Forces (no longer available; for more information, contact Steven R. Bowman at 7-7613). 9 Ibid. 10 11 Ibid. Department of the Army, Organization of the United States Army, Pamphlet 10-1, June 14, 1994, J4-J10. CRS-6 Number of Personnel Military Unit XVIII Airborne Corps (Selected Units) Home Military Base 8,000 Fort Bragg, NC nd 5,000 Fort Bragg, NC th 2,000 Fort Sill, OK 1,800 Wuerzburg, Germany 4,400 Fort Stewart, GA 82 Airborne Division 17 Field Artillery Brigade st 1 Infantry Division (Mechanized) rd 3 Infantry Division (Mechanized), 2 Unit of Action Brigade nd 42nd Infantry Division (Mechanized) nd nd 23,000 Troy, NY 2 Brigade, 2 Infantry Division 3,614 Camp Red Cloud, South Korea 29th Infantry Brigade (Separate), Hawaii National Guard 3,600 Kalaeloa, Oahu, HI 81st Armor Brigade (Separate), Washington National Guard 4,500 Seattle, WA 56th Brigade Combat Team, 36th Infantry Division, Texas Army National Guard 2,944 Fort Worth, TX 155th Armored Brigade (Separate), Mississippi Army National Guard 4,015 Tupelo, MS 30th Infantry Brigade (eHSB) Mechanized, North Carolina Army National Guard 4,500 Clinton, NC 39th Infantry Brigade (eHSB) (Light), Arkansas Army National Guard 4,200 Little Rock, AR Navy The Carrier Strike Group (CSG) does not have an official definition or standard composition. Battle groups are formed and disestablished by the Navy on an as needed basis, and one may be different from another. However, they all are comprised of similar types of ships and aircraft. The U.S. Navy announced on April 9, 2003, that the USS Abraham Lincoln CSG was relieved of duty by the USS Nimitz, and would be returning to homeport. DOD officials said during a Pentagon briefing on April 14, 2003, that the USS Constellation and USS Kitty Hawk CSGs were being withdrawn from the Iraqi theater of operations to return to their homeports. On May 9, 2003, the USS Theodore Roosevelt CSG was ordered to return to homeport, and on May 15, 2003, the Navy reported that the USS Harry S. Truman CSG had withdrawn and would return from deployment. On September 5, 2003, DOD officials said the USS Nimitz CSG was departing the Persian Gulf to replace the USS Carl Vinson in the Pacific Ocean. On November 3, 2003, the USS Enterprise CSG deployed from the port of Jebel Ali, United Arab Emirates, for the North Arabian Sea. The USS Enterprise CSG was scheduled to return to its homeport of Norfolk, VA, on February 29, 2004, and was replaced by the USS George Washington CSG on February 16, 2004. The USS George Washington CSG returned to its Norfolk, VA homeport on July 26, 2004, and was replaced by the USS John F. Kennedy CSG. The USS John F. Kennedy CSG was CRS-7 relieved of duty station by the USS Harry S. Truman CSG on November 20, 2004. The USS Carl Vinson CSG replaced the USS Harry S. Truman CSG on March 19, 2005. The USS Carl Vinson CSG will continue military and maritime operations in support of OIF. The USS Nimitz CSG replaced the USS Carl Vinson CSG in the Persian Gulf on July 5, 2005. The USS Theodore Roosevelt CSG arrived on station to replace the USS Nimitz CSG on September 24, 2005. Support Ship. The USNS Comfort hospital ship is a 1,000-bed medical treatment facility capable of providing emergency on-site care for U.S. combatant forces deployed in war and peacetime operations. The ship is also equipped to deliver medical care for troops injured in biological and chemical attacks. On May 9, 2003, the Comfort was ordered to return to its homeport in Baltimore, MD. USS Theodore Roosevelt Carrier Strike Group. Carrier Air Wing 8 consists of 70-80 aircraft including the: F/A-18C Hornet, F/A-18E/F Super Hornet, E-2CHawkeye, EA-6B Prowler, C-2A Greyhound, SH-60F/HH-60H Seahawk. Table 7. USS Theodore Roosevelt Carrier Strike Group Name Type of Ship Homeport USS Theodore Roosevelt Nuclear-powered aircraft carrier Norfolk, VA USS San Jacinto Guided missile cruiser Norfolk, VA USS Oscar Austin Guided missile destroyer Norfolk, VA USS Donald Cook Guided missile destroyer Norfolk, VA SPS Alvaro de Bazan Frigate Spain USNS Mount Baker Combat logistics ship Earle, NJ USNS Kanawha Combat logistics ship Norfolk, VA Marine Corps A complete Marine Expeditionary Force (MEF) consists of approximately 45,000 personnel. A Marine Expeditionary Brigade (MEB) has 15,000 troops, and the Marine Expeditionary Unit (MEU) is composed of nearly 2,000 marines.12 12 CRS Report 91-167, Persian Gulf War (out of print; available from author: 7-8983). CRS-8 Table 8. Marine Corps Personnel Deployed or Alerted Military Unit Number of Personnel Home Military Base I Marine Expeditionary Force 25,000 Camp Pendleton, C II Marine Expeditionary Force (Forward) (Selected Elements) 20,000 Camp Lejeune, NC 2nd Marine Division (selected elements) 1,850 Camp Lejeune, NC 13th Marine Expeditionary Unit (SOC) 2,100 Camp Pendleton 3rd Marine Aircraft Wing (Selected Elements) 7,500 San Diego, CA Operationally, these Marine Corps units are organized into Amphibious Task Forces that consist of three Amphibious Ready Groups (ARGs) or battle groups. Each ARG is led by an amphibious assault helicopter carrier with approximately 2,000 marines on board.13 On June 13, 2003, the Marine Corps reported that the 2nd Marine Expeditionary Brigade had withdrawn from Iraq and would return to Camp Lejeune on June 22, 2003. The 15th MEU on April 29, 2003, and the 26th MEU on July 10, 2003, were both withdrawn from Iraq and redeployed. The 26th MEU returned to Iraq on May 2, 2005, and redeployed to its home military base on August 30, 2005. Amphibious Task Force East. Six to eight aircraft and 33 helicopters, including AV-8 Harrier, CH-53 Sea Stallions, CH-46 Sea Knights, AH-1 Sea Cobras, Mechanized Landing (LCM), Landing Craft Utility (LCU), and Landing Craft, Air Cushion (LCAC) landing craft. On June 6, 2003, the Navy reported that the sailors, marines, and ships attached to Amphibious Task Force East would return to Norfolk, VA, on June 25-26, 2003. Amphibious Task Force West. Six to eight aircraft and 33 helicopters, including AV-8 Harrier, CH-53 Sea Stallions, CH-46 Sea Knights, AH-1 Sea Cobras, Mechanized Landing (LCM), Landing Craft Utility (LCU), and Landing Craft, Air Cushion (LCAC) landing craft. On July 30, 2003, the Navy reported that the sailors, marines, and ships attached to Amphibious Task Force West returned to San Diego on July 26, 2003. On July 25, 2003, the Navy ordered the Iwo Jima Amphibious Ready Group to redeploy from Iraq. On July 25, 2003, President George W. Bush ordered the USS Iwo Jima to take a position for possible action off the coast of Liberia. Expeditionary Strike Groups (ESG). Expeditionary Strike Group One, led by the USS Peleliu Amphibious Assault Ship, is the first ESG to deploy overseas. The ESG arrived in the USCENTCOM area of responsibility in September 2003 with 13 “Sending in the Marines,” Washington Post, Jan. 29, 2003, p. A13. CRS-9 the assigned mission of “providing a post-war presence in the region, aid in peacekeeping, security, and to promote an environment conducive to rebuilding a new Iraqi government.”14 ESG One was scheduled to return to the United States during the first week of March 2004. Expeditionary Strike Group Two is led by the USS Wasp Amphibious Assault Ship — the first ESG to deploy from the East Coast. ESG Two departed from Norfolk, VA, on February 17, 2004, to replace ESG One.15 Expeditionary Strike Group Three (ESG 3), also known as the Belleau Wood ESG 3, entered the U.S. Navy’s 5th Fleet on July 2, 2004, and will assume the duties of maritime security operations in the Northern Arabian Gulf (NAG). The NAG security operations include security of the Al Basrah and Khawr Al Amaya Iraqi oil terminals.16 Expeditionary Strike Group Two was redeployed to its homeport on August 21, 2004. ESG Three changed flag staff and ships at sea, from the USS Belleau Wood to the USS Essex. The Essex Expeditionary Strike Group was officially activated on September 10, 2004, and will be responsible for “Maritme Security Operations (MSO) in the Northern Arabian Gulf, to include protection of Al Basrah Oil Terminal (ABOT) and Khawr Oil Terminal (KAAOT) off the coast of Iraq.”17 The USS Bonhomme Richard ESG arrived in the Persian Gulf on January 26, 2005, to relieve the Essex ESG.18 The USS Kearsarge ESG arrived on station in the Persian Gulf on May 2, 2005, to replace the USS Bonhomme Richard ESG. The USS Kearsarge will be conducting maritime security operations.19 The USS Kearsarge ESG redeployed and departed its Persian Gulf station, when it transited the Suez Canal on August 30, 2005.20 The USS Tarawa ESG arrived on station in the Persian Gulf on November 16, 2005. Designated (ESG 1), the Tarawa ESG’s mission is to lead a task force of six coalition ships in conducting MSO in the North Arabian Sea and the Gulf of Oman.21 14 “ESG 1 Heads North in Support of Operation Iraqi Freedom,” Navy Newsstand, Oct. 21, 2003. 15 “Wasp Strike Group and 22 MEU to Deploy,” Navy Newsstand, Feb. 10, 2004. 16 “ESG 3 Assumes Maritime Security Mission,” Navy Newsstand, Jul. 7, 2004. 17 “ESG 3 Proves Flexibility, Mobility with First Staff Cross Deck at Sea,” Navy Newstand, Sept. 15, 2004. 18 “Bonhomme Richard Arrives On Station in Persian Gulf,” Navy Newsstand, Jan. 26, 2005. 19 “Kearsarge on Station in Persian Gulf,” Navy Newsstand, May 3, 2005. 20 “26th MEU Completes Distributed OPS in CENTCOM AOR,” Marine Corps News, Aug. 31, 2005. 21 “ESG-1 Conducts Maritime Security Operations in Arabian Sea,” Navy Newsstand, Nov. 16, 2005. CRS-10 Table 9. USS Tarawa Expeditionary Strike Group Name Type of Ship Homeport USS Tarawa Amphibious assault ship San Diego, CA USS Cleveland Amphibious transport dock ship San Diego, CA USS Pearl Harbor Amphibious dock landing ship San Diego, CA Air Force The units listed below are those DOD has publically acknowledged have been deployed; additional units and aircraft may have been deployed but not acknowledged. Table 10. Air Force Units Military Unit Military Base th Baghdad IAP/Camp Sather, Iraq th 506 Air Expeditionary Group Kirkuk Air Base, Iraq 40th Air Expeditionary Wing (selected elements) Diego Garcia , BIOT 320th Air Expeditionary Wing Seeb IAP, Oman 321st Air Expeditionary Wing Masirah AB, Oman 332nd Air Expeditionary Wing Balad Air Base, Iraq 380th Air Expeditionary Wing Al Dhafra Air Base, United Arab Emirates 386th Air Expeditionary Wing Ali Al Salem Air Base, Kuwait 447 Air Expeditionary Group th Thumrait Air Base, Oman th Tallil Air Base, Iraq 405 Air Expeditionary Wing 407 Air Expeditionary Group Coast Guard According to the Coast Guard (CG), during peak OIF operations there were 1,250 active duty personnel and nearly 500 reservists, two large cutters, a buoy tender, eight patrol boats (CGCs), four port security units, and law enforcement detachments deployed to the Persian Gulf region.22 On May 23, 2003, the Coast Guard announced the CGCs Dallas, Pea Island, Knight Island, Bainbridge Island, and Grand Isle would be returning to their homeports. On June 10, 2003, the Navy reported that Naval Coastal Warfare Group 1 had completed their port security and harbor defense mission and would return to San Diego, CA. Port Security Unit 313 22 U.S. Coast Guard, Factcard, Operation Iraqi Freedom, Sept. 2003. CRS-11 returned to Tacoma, WA, on August 27, 2003. On June 2, 2004, at the request of DOD officials, the CG ordered the deployment of two additional 110-foot Patrol Boats and two Law Enforcement Detachments. These additional units will bring the total number of CG personnel currently supporting Operation Iraqi Freedom to 400.23 Table 11. Coast Guard Personnel Units Home Base Port Security Unit 307 St. Petersburg, FL PacificTactical Law Enforcement Detachment - South St. Petersburg, FL PacificTactical Law Enforcement Detachment - Pacific San Diego, CA Harbor Defense Command Unit 111 Alameda, CA Table 12. Coast Guard Cutters Name Type of Ship Homeport CGC Wrangell Island Class Cutter South Portland, ME CGC Adak Island Class Cutter Sandy Hook, NJ CGC Aquidneck Island Class Cutter Atlantic Beach, NC CGC Baranof Island Class Cutter Miami, FL CGC Monomoy Island Class Cutter Woods Hole, MA CGC Maui Island Class Cutter San Juan, PR 23 U.S. Coast Guard, Press Release, Coast Guard Deploys Additional Units To Support Operation Iraqi Freedom, June 2, 2004.