Combating Terrorism: 2001 Congressional Debate on Emergency Supplemental Allocations

Within days of the September 11 terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon, Congress approved a $40 billion emergency supplemental appropriations ( P.L. 107-38 / H.R. 2888 ) to aid victims of the terrorist attacks, to bolster security at airports and other sites, to pursue the investigation and prosecution of those responsible, and to support national security. The appropriation measure partitioned the $40 billion into three clusters. The first $10 billion was available immediately for allocation by the President. The second $10 billion was available 15 days after the President notified Congress about how he would distribute the funds. The final $20 billion would be allocated within an enacted FY2002 appropriation bill. Through notifications beginning on September 21, the Administration fully allocated the first $20 billion over the following five months. Between February and August 2002, the White House has made some adjustments to these earlier distributions, primarily to provide additional funds for the Transportation Security Administration. Congress allocated the final $20 billion as a separate title in the FY2002 Defense Department Appropriation ( P.L. 107-117 ; H.R. 3338 ), cleared for the White House on December 20. Of the $40 billion total, the White House proposed $21.1 billion for the Defense Department (53%); $18.9 billion for non-defense agencies (47.3%). Among non-defense programs, recovery activities, including debris removal, efforts to repair damaged equipment and infrastructure, and relocation of dislocated offices and workers, would receive the largest share -- roughly $6.2 billion, or 15% of the total. Victim relief represented an 8.3% share, or $3.3 billion, and physical security -- for both infrastructure and aviation -- totaled about $4.1 billion or 10%. Resources to combat bioterrorism totaled $1.6 billion, or about 4.4% of the total. There was broad bipartisan support for the enactment of significant additional resources for recovery and response to the September 11 terrorism attacks. Nevertheless, sharp differences emerged as to whether the original $40 billion package was sufficient, whether the allocations matched the most critical priorities, especially regarding homeland security needs, and whether New York and other jurisdictions directly affected by the attacks were receiving adequate funds. Many assumed that New York would receive about half, or $20 billion of the total emergency supplemental. President Bush said he would veto any spending measure enacted in 2001 that went beyond the $40 billion approved in P.L. 107-38 . On January 10, 2002, the President signed into law P.L. 107-117 ( H.R. 3338 ), the Defense Appropriations bill that includes the "second" $20 billion in emergency supplemental spending for homeland security, increased defense needs, and other efforts to combat terrorism. As enacted, P.L. 107-117 differs significantly from the plan President Bush proposed. The legislation roughly doubles the request for bioterrorism, law enforcement, and infrastructure security activities, while reducing by more than half the $7.3 billion proposed for defense.

Order Code RL31187 CRS Report for Congress Received through the CRS Web Combating Terrorism: 2001 Congressional Debate on Emergency Supplemental Allocations Updated September 27, 2002 (name redacted) (namearry redacted) Foreign Affairs, Defense, and Trade Division Congressional Research Service ˜ The Library of Congress Combating Terrorism: 2001 Congressional Debate on Emergency Supplemental Allocations Summary Within days of the September 11 terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon, Congress approved a $40 billion emergency supplemental appropriations (P.L. 107-38/H.R. 2888) to aid victims of the terrorist attacks, to bolster security at airports and other sites, to pursue the investigation and prosecution of those responsible, and to support national security. The appropriation measure partitioned the $40 billion into three clusters. The first $10 billion was available immediately for allocation by the President. The second $10 billion was available 15 days after the President notified Congress about how he would distribute the funds. The final $20 billion would be allocated within an enacted FY2002 appropriation bill. Through notifications beginning on September 21, the Administration fully allocated the first $20 billion over the following five months. Between February and August 2002, the White House has made some adjustments to these earlier distributions, primarily to provide additional funds for the Transportation Security Administration. Congress allocated the final $20 billion as a separate title in the FY2002 Defense Department Appropriation (P.L. 107-117; H.R. 3338), cleared for the White House on December 20. Of the $40 billion total, the White House proposed $21.1 billion for the Defense Department (53%); $18.9 billion for non-defense agencies (47.3%). Among nondefense programs, recovery activities, including debris removal, efforts to repair damaged equipment and infrastructure, and relocation of dislocated offices and workers, would receive the largest share – roughly $6.2 billion, or 15% of the total. Victim relief represented an 8.3% share, or $3.3 billion, and physical security – for both infrastructure and aviation – totaled about $4.1 billion or 10%. Resources to combat bioterrorism totaled $1.6 billion, or about 4.4% of the total. There was broad bipartisan support for the enactment of significant additional resources for recovery and response to the September 11 terrorism attacks. Nevertheless, sharp differences emerged as to whether the original $40 billion package was sufficient, whether the allocations matched the most critical priorities, especially regarding homeland security needs, and whether New York and other jurisdictions directly affected by the attacks were receiving adequate funds. Many assumed that New York would receive about half, or $20 billion of the total emergency supplemental. President Bush said he would veto any spending measure enacted in 2001 that went beyond the $40 billion approved in P.L. 107-38. On January 10, 2002, the President signed into law P.L. 107-117 (H.R. 3338), the Defense Appropriations bill that includes the “second” $20 billion in emergency supplemental spending for homeland security, increased defense needs, and other efforts to combat terrorism. As enacted, P.L. 107-117 differs significantly from the plan President Bush proposed. The legislation roughly doubles the request for bioterrorism, law enforcement, and infrastructure security activities, while reducing by more than half the $7.3 billion proposed for defense. Contents Most Recent Developments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Composition of the Supplemental Funds to Combat Terrorism . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Division and Distribution of the Total $40 billion Package . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Allocation by Federal Agency . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Policy Priorities of Emergency Supplemental Allocations . . . . . . . . . . 5 The President’s $20 Billion Allocation Request and Congressional Debate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Congressional Debate and Modifications to the President’s Proposal . 9 Appendix A - Defense Funding Request . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 Appendix B – Non-Defense Emergency Supplemental Transfers Organized by Appropriations Bill and Account . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 List of Figures Figure 1. Composition of $40 Billion Supplemental Requested . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Figure 2. Composition of $40 Billion Supplemental Enacted . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Figure 3. Allocation of $40 Billion by Major Purposes: Administration Plan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Figure 4. Allocation of $40 Billion by Major Purposes: Actual . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Figure 5. President’s Request for the Second $20 Billion Allocation . . . . . . . . 10 Figure 6. Enacted Allocation of Second $20 Billion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 List of Tables Table 1. Allocations of Funds to Combat Terrorism by Agency . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Table 2. Combating Terrorism Supplemental Transfers: Policy Priorities . . . . . . 6 Table 3. Congressional Action on DOD’s Share of $20 Billion Supplemental . . 20 Table A1. DOD Allocations under $40 Billion Emergency Terrorism Response Supplemental . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Appendix – Summary of All Appropriations Bills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 Agriculture and Related Agencies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 Commerce, Justice, and State, the Judiciary, and Related Agencies . . . . . . . . . . 30 Defense and Military Construction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 District of Columbia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37 Energy and Water Development . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39 Foreign Operations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41 Interior and Related Agencies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44 Labor, Health and Human Services, and Education . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46 Legislative Branch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50 Transportation and Related Agencies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52 Treasury, Postal Service, Executive Office of the President, and General Govt . 56 Veterans Affairs, Housing and Urban Development, and Independent Agencies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61 Combating Terrorism: 2001 Congressional Debate on Emergency Supplemental Allocations Most Recent Developments On January 10, 2002, President Bush signed into law P.L. 107-117 (H.R. 3338), the Defense Appropriations bill that includes $20 billion in emergency supplemental spending for homeland security, increased defense needs, and other efforts to combat terrorism. The $20 billion package had been enacted earlier in mid-September as part of a $40 billion emergency spending measure (P.L. 107-38) to support recovery efforts following the attacks and to launch the war against terrorism. President Bush controlled the allocation of first $20 billion portion while Congress was required to distribute the second $20 billion in a subsequent appropriation bill. As enacted, P.L. 107-117 differs significantly from the plan President Bush proposed in mid-October for allocating the second $20 billion portion. The legislation roughly doubles the request for bioterrorism, law enforcement, and infrastructure security activities, while reducing by more than half the $7.3 billion proposed for defense. Earlier, the House and Senate each had rejected efforts to provide additional sums beyond the $20 billion total. Proposals would have added between $6 billion and $15 billion, largely for homeland security and relief for New York and other jurisdictions most directly affected by the attacks. The final compromise – to increase homeland security and New York aid and decrease defense resources – partially accommodated the position of those who sought more spending for the domestic programs, but without exceeding $20 billion. President Bush had threatened to veto legislation that went beyond $20 billion, arguing that sufficient money was available for the time being, and that he would consider additional needs in 2002. The Administration has proposed $37.7 billion for homeland security activities in FY2003. Introduction Within days of the September 11 terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon, Congress approved a $40 billion emergency supplemental appropriation (P.L. 107-38/H.R. 2888) to aid victims of the terrorist attacks, to bolster security at airports and other sites, to pursue the investigation and prosecution of those responsible, and to support national security. The appropriation measure, which was designated as emergency spending so that it would not be subject to limitations set in concurrent budget resolutions, partitioned the $40 billion into three clusters: CRS-2 ! $10 billion was immediately available to the President, following consultation with House and Senate Appropriations Committee leaders. ! $10 billion was available following the submission by the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) of a specific plan regarding how the funds will be allocated. Congress had 15 days to review and consult with Administration officials over the spending plan before resources became available. ! $20 billion would be available for obligation only when amounts were specifically allocated in FY2002 appropriations measures passed by Congress. Of the $40 billion total, not less than $20 billion “shall be allocated for disaster recovery activities and assistance related to the terrorist acts in New York, Pennsylvania, and Virginia on September 11, 2001.”1 The President would submit detailed requests to Congress if further funding is required. The Director of OMB was to provide quarterly reports to the appropriations committees on the use of funds, beginning on January 2, 2002. Beginning on September 21, OMB sent Congress a series of notifications of intended and requested allocations of the $40 billion emergency supplemental, including a notice on October 16 containing details of the $20 billion proposal that would need to be enacted by Congress in an FY2002 appropriation bill. Congress debated the request as a separate section to the FY2002 Defense Appropriation bill, the final spending measure taken up by Congress in 2001. As costs of recovery and response efforts rose, however, policy differences emerged over the amount, timing, and priorities of the supplemental spending. The White House, concerned over potential rising budget deficits for FY2002, argued that the $40 billion emergency total was sufficient for the moment, but that the President would entertain more spending in 2002 if needs exist. Many lawmakers, including senior Appropriations Committee members, however, called for immediate resources well above the $40 billion figure, with an emphasis on funds for New York City in order to meet the $20 billion allocation directive in P.L. 107-38. President Bush said that he would veto legislation passed in 2001 that would spend more than the $40 billion already enacted. This report discusses the overall composition of the Administration’s plan to allocate the $40 billion supplemental. It provides the status of the planned and proposed allocations by category, agency, general purpose, and appropriation account. It further tracks congressional debate, highlighting alternative initiatives under consideration and assessing major changes directed by Congress. An appendix attached at the end of the report includes 12 tables that describe the purposes and spending amounts in each appropriation chapter and congressional decisions for allocating the second $20 billion portion. 1 P.L. 107-38. CRS-3 Composition of the Supplemental Funds to Combat Terrorism Division and Distribution of the Total $40 billion Package For the total $40 billion supplemental, the White House proposed that over half – $21.1 billion, or 52.8% – would be allocated for the DOD, while $18.9 billion, or 47.3% would be distributed among non-defense agencies. As illustrated in Figures 1 and 2 below, Congress, through enactment of H.R. 3338, altered the President’s recommended plan. The majority – $22.7 billion, or 56.6% – is now available for non-defense activities, while $17.3 billion, or 43.3%, supports defense programs. Allocation by Federal Agency. Other than the Department of Defense, the other major agency recipients, out of the $40 billion total, are the Federal Emergency Management Agency ($5.6 billion), which provides disaster assistance relief, Health and Human Services ($2.9 billion), Housing and Urban Affairs ($2.7 billion), Justice ($2.1 billion), and Transportation ($3 billion).2 Table 1. Allocations of Funds to Combat Terrorism by Agency (in billions of dollars and percentage of total) Department/ Agency Totals Total Supplemental Executed Fifteen-day Admin. P.L. Total transfers wait request 107-117 Supplement As % of $40 Bil. $10.0 $10.0 $20.0 $20.0 $40.0 100.0% Defense subtotal 5.9 7.9 7.3 3.5 17.3 43.3% Non-defense subtotal 4.1 2.1 12.7 16.5 22.7 56.6% FEMA 1.0 0.0 5.5 4.6 5.6 14.0% HHS 0.1 0.0 1.6 2.8 2.9 7.3% HUD 0.0 0.7 0.0 2.0 2.7 6.8% Justice 0.0 0.0 1.1 2.1 2.1 5.3% Transportation 1.2 0.5 0.7 1.3 3.0 7.5% State 0.3 0.5 0.0 0.0 0.8 2.0% USAID 0.6 0.1 0.0 0.1 0.8 2.0% Treasury 0.1 0.0 0.3 0.6 0.7 1.8% U.S. Postal Service 0.0 0.2 0.0 0.5 0.7 1.8% Labor 0.0 0.0 2.0 0.2 0.2 0.5% Other non-defense 0.8 0.1 1.5 2.3 3.2 8.0% Sources: OMB, House and Senate Appropriations Committees, CRS calculations. 2 During early to mid-2002, the White House reallocated some funds from earlier distributions. The largest involved the transfer of $1.03 billion previously allocated to FEMA to the Transportation Security Administration. Such transfers were regarded as “bridge loans” for TSA. The intent was to restore FEMA funding out of the then-pending FY2002 Supplemental Appropriation. CRS-4 Figure 1. Composition of $40 Billion Supplemental Requested ($s - billions & % of total) Non-defense $18.9 47.3% 52.8% Defense $21.1 Figure 2. Composition of $40 Billion Supplemental Enacted ($s - billions & % of total) Non-defnse $22.7 56.8% 43.3% Defense $17.3 CRS-5 Policy Priorities of Emergency Supplemental Allocations. There has been broad bipartisan support for the enactment of significant additional resources for recovery and response to the September 11 terrorism attacks. Nevertheless, sharp differences emerged as to whether the original $40 billion package was sufficient, whether the allocations matched the most critical priorities, especially regarding homeland security needs, and whether New York and other jurisdictions directly affected by the attacks were receiving adequate funds. Many assumed that New York would receive about half, or $20 billion of the total emergency supplemental. Table 2 and Figures 3 and 4 below provide estimates of how the Administration’s planned and proposed allocations of the $40 billion were distributed across ten general categories, and how these amounts compared to Congressional changes.3 Under the President’s plan, Defense activities (outlined in more detail below) would have accounted for over half of the $40 billion supplemental, while recovery activities, would have received roughly $6.2 billion, or 15.5% of the total. With the enactment of H.R. 3338, total amounts for both of these categories fell in order to make room within the $40 billion for increases elsewhere. Defense funds dropped to $17.3 billion, or 43.4% of the total, while recovery resources declined to $6 billion, or a 15.1% share of the total. Although all other activities represent far smaller shares of the supplemental package, funding for several rose sharply as a result of congressional decisions in H.R. 3338. For combating bioterrorism, the White House had proposed $1.8 billion, while final amounts total $3 billion, or 7.6% of the total. Aviation and infrastructure security would have received $4.1 billion under the President’s proposal, but with enactment of H.R. 3338, these activities received $5.7 billion, or 14.3% of the $40 billion package. Direct aid to victims of the attacks had totaled $3.3 billion under the President’s plan, growing slightly to $3.5 billion, or 8.8% of the total under the final allocation. Resources for investigation and law enforcement activities would have received a $1.5 billion allocation, an amount that grew, following enactment of H.R. 3338, to $2.6 billion, or 6.5% of the total. (Details of congressional debate on H.R. 3338 are discussed below.) Despite Congress’ cut of $3.5 billion in the $7.3 billion DOD request for the emergency supplemental, the President’s general priorities for defense spending to combat terrorism remained largely intact. In both the President’s request and in the enacted bill, about 29% of the $17.3 billion allocated for Defense in the Emergency Terrorism Response supplemental is for funding of the Afghan war, and another 29% is for intelligence and surveillance activities. The remaining funds are distributed 3 These figures are based on CRS analysis and should be regarded as illustrative rather than a precise calculation of exact allocations. Some OMB notifications have combined funding for multiple purposes, making it impossible to disaggregate specifically among the ten categories used here. Moreover, differences exist over how to characterize the purposes and categories of emergency funds. The presentation made here offers one possible analytical scheme. In addition, figures have been adjusted to reflect ten additional notifications made between February and August 2002 regarding the reallocation of funds that had previously been made available for other purposes. The largest amounts involved the transfer of funds from FEMA to the Transportation Security Administration. The Administration planned to restore FEMA funding following enactment of the FY2002 Supplemental appropriation. CRS-6 among self-defense weapons for ships and upgraded security at bases (8.6%), improved command and control (8%), precision-guided munitions (10.4%), repair and upgrade of the Pentagon, and initial crisis response (8.4% and 3.9% respectively). For more detail, see Table A1 in the Appendix. Table 2. Combating Terrorism Supplemental Transfers: Policy Priorities ($s – millions) Purpose Bioterrorism Defense 15House Executed Admin Day/Wait Passed Transfers Request Transfers H.R. (1st $10B) ($20B) nd (2 $10B) 3338 Senate Passed P.L. H.R. 107-117 3338 Total $40B $3,018 $0 $175 $1,587 $2,160 $3,046 $2,843 $5,900 $7,915 $7,349 $7,348 $2,000 $3,500 $17,315 Humanitarian and other foreign aid $824 $412 $0 $0 $0 $50 $1,286 Investigation and law enforcement $188 $119 $1,179 $1,158 $2,367 $2,270 $2,577 Preparedness $4 $11 $655 $539 $450 $438 $452 $12 $44 $0 $19 $0 $19 $75 Recovery from attacks $960 $60 $5,166 $4,578 $6,503 $5,023 $6,043 Securityinfrastructure $592 $131 $1,390 $1,422 $2,676 $2,843 $3,566 $1,211 $409 $415 $490 $508 $540 $2,160 $312 $725 $2,260 $2,285 $2,473 $2,479 $3,516 Public diplomacy Securityaviation Victim relief TOTAL $10,000 $10,000 $20,000 $20,000 $20,000 $20,000 $40,000 Source: CRS estimates. Columns may not add due to rounding. Congress was able to accommodate the $3.5 billion cut to defense by providing funding within the regular defense bill, by deferring less urgent requests, and by inserting a provision that permits DOD to transfer up to $1.65 billion, or 1.5% of the FY2002 appropriations, for RDT&E and procurement to fund the Afghan war or DOD’s homeland defense activities, should that prove necessary.4 Congress also 4 In the regular DOD appropriations bill, Congress provided $478 million to improve (continued...) CRS-7 restored the funding requested to repair and upgrade the Pentagon by transferring $300 million of the funds remaining in the emergency supplemental that were to be distributed by the President.5 Finally, in floor debate, several members of Congress noted that the President was expected to submit another supplemental with additional funding for defense when Congress reconvenes in January 2002. Spending Category Definitions Defense – Increased situational awareness (including classified), enhanced force protection, improved command and control, increased worldwide posture (costs of Afghan conflict), offensive counterterrorism, initial crisis response, Pentagon repair, National Guard airport security, and other military construction. Bioterrorism – countering potential biological, disease, and chemical threats to civilian populations. Humanitarian and other Foreign Aid – food and refugee relief for the Afghan people, plus economic and security support for Pakistan and other “front-line” coalition partners in Central Asia. Investigation and Law Enforcement – Departments of Justice, Treasury, State and other agency investigative and legal work following the September 11 attacks. Preparedness – training, technical assistance and other activities aimed at strengthening the capacity to respond to future terrorist events. Public Diplomacy – enhanced U.S. broadcasts and media outreach capabilities to the people in Central and Southwest Asia. Recovery – debris removal, efforts to repair damaged equipment and infrastructure, and relocation of dislocated offices and workers (excluding Pentagon repairs). Security of Infrastructure/Personnel – strengthened security at critical U.S. facilities worldwide (excluding DOD facilities) and evacuation of overseas personnel. Security of Aviation Facilities – enhanced security at U.S. airports and on-board aircraft (excluding DOD funding to station National Guard personnel at airports). Victim Relief – assistance to individuals, families, and businesses directly affected by the September 11 attacks. 4 (...continued) protection of DOD’s weapons and facilities, thus restoring roughly half of the President’s request (see Title IX of H.R. 3338). In the allocation of the emergency supplemental in H.R. 3338, Congress inserted a provision that permits DOD to transfer up to 1.5% of RDT&E and procurement funds to Operation Enduring Freedom (Afghan war), and Operation Noble Anvil (combat air patrol activities on both coasts for homeland defense), thus providing another mechanism to ensure that adequate funding would be available. 5 Congress transferred $300 million of the funds that were to be allocated by the president from the first $20 billion to upgrade the Pentagon, thus matching the total requested by DOD (see H.Rept. 107-350, p. 424, and section 305(b) of H.R. 3338). CRS-8 Figure 3. Allocation of $40 Billion by Major Purposes: Administration Plan Defense Preparedness 53.0% Security 1.7% 10.4% 3.1% Foreign aid 15.5% 4.4% 8.3% 3.7% Recovery Bioterrorism Investigation Victim Relief Figure 4. Allocation of $40 Billion by Major Purposes: Actual Preparedness Defense 43.4% Security 1.1% 14.3% 3.2% Foreign aid 15.1% 7.6% 6.5% 8.8% Recovery Bioterrorism Investigation Victim Relief CRS-9 The President’s $20 Billion Allocation Request and Congressional Debate The allocation process established in P.L. 107-38 for the Emergency Supplemental spending measure guaranteed Congress a central role in deciding how half of $40 billion anti-terrorism money would be spent. On October 16, OMB submitted its plan for the second $20 billion portion of the supplemental that Congress must subsequently enact. Under the President’s plan for use of that $20 billion (Figure 5 below and Table 2 above), the two largest shares of the supplemental request would go to DOD (over one-third) and to recovery activities (over one-quarter), for a total of $12.5 billion. Assistance to victims of the terrorist attacks represented about 11%, or $2.3 billion. Infrastructure and aviation security would receive 9%, or about $1.8 billion, while funding to combat bioterrorism and investigative activities represented slightly smaller shares of 8% or $1.4 billion, and 6% or $1.2 billion, respectively. There was no humanitarian and other foreign assistance proposed in the second $20 billion request. Congressional Debate and Modifications to the President’s Proposal. Following days of extensive negotiations among Members and with the White House, the House Appropriations Committee voted on November 14 to approve $20 billion in supplemental spending related to the terrorist attacks of September 11. The money was attached as a separate section to the FY2002 Defense Department Appropriation (H.R. 3338; H.Rept. 107-298). Prior to the House Committee markup, a number of Members began to question whether $20 billion was sufficient to meet all of the pressing needs related to the terrorist attacks. Some argued that the President’s proposal lacked enough funding for such things as law enforcement, bioterrorism preparedness, border protection, and other homeland security priorities. Others, especially Members from New York, contended that the President’s plan fell far short of the $20 billion that they anticipated would be allocated out of the $40 billion total to meet the specific needs of New York City, Virginia, and rural Pennsylvania where the attacks had the most direct impact. They estimated that only about $9.7 billion was slated for New York. Still others believed that additional defense resources were required beyond the $7.3 billion recommended by the Administration in the $20 billion plan. This issue became especially controversial when President Bush, on November 6, said he would veto the appropriation measure if it exceeded the $20 billion he had proposed. CRS-10 Figure 5. President’s Request for the Second $20 Billion Allocation Defense 36.8% Security 8.9% Bioterrorism 7.0% 5.9% 25.9% 11.3% Investigation 4.2% Victim Relief Recovery Preparedness House Committee Markup. Before voting to approve H.R. 3338, the House Appropriations Committee considered, but rejected three amendments that would have pushed emergency terrorism spending beyond the $20 billion: ! An amendment by Representative Obey (rejected 31-34) would have added $6.5 billion. Major increases above the Committee recommendations centered on initiatives to prepare against bioterrorism (+ $1.1 billion); to better secure CDC, NIH, FDA and other facilities where biological agents are kept (+$850 million); to enhance mail security (+$500 million); to hire more air marshals, secure aircraft cockpit doors and take other airline security measures (+$450 million); to augment FBI and other law enforcement capabilities (+$900 million); to combat nuclear proliferation and to improve security of U.S. nuclear weapons (+$950 million); and to enhance security for ports, trains, buses, colleges, and government buildings (+$675 million). The amendment further proposed $832 million for Military Construction (+$730 million), including $482 million to construct a second lab at Ft. Derrick, Maryland, to increase capacity to handle dangerous pathogens like smallpox. ! An amendment by Representative Murtha (rejected by voice vote) proposed an additional $6.5 billion for the Department of Defense, almost doubling the $7.3 billion proposed by the Administration. The bulk of the proposed increases were from Defense Department proposals that were rejected by the Office of Management and Budget. The chief increases in the amendment were: a more than CRS-11 doubling of the amount for intelligence programs (from $1.8 billion to $3.8 billion) and precision guided munitions and other equipment (from $624 million to $1.5 billion); $602 million in upgrades to aircraft, and $800 million to accelerate renovation of the Pentagon. ! An amendment by Representative Walsh (rejected 31-33) would have added $9.7 billion. Additional funds focused on economic relief and recovery for individuals and businesses in New York – unemployment assistance (+$880 million); HUD’s Community Development Fund (+$900 million); and FEMA disaster relief activities in New York, Northern Virginia, and Pennsylvania (+$6.56 billion). Following defeat of the Walsh amendment, proponents of additional funding for New York continued to negotiate with Committee leaders and the White House for more funds. On November 19 Representative Walsh reached an agreement with the Administration that would result in the transfer of about $2.1 billion to meet immediate needs in New York.6 By some estimates, this would bring the total for New York out of the entire $40 billion supplemental to approximately $11. 5 billion. The transfers for New York would be drawn from other programs. Figure 6. Enacted Allocation of Second $20 Billion Defense 17.5% Bioterrorism Preparedness Security 2.2% 16.9% 14.2% 0.3% Foreign aid 11.4% 25.1% Investigation 12.4% Recovery Victim Relief 6 About $1.5 billion of the funds for New York represented new resources for individuals and businesses directly affected by the terrorist attacks while another $555 million was redirected from FEMA debris removal and reconstruction activities in New York City to HUD economic development programs to aid residents and businesses in the region. CRS-12 House Consideration of Non-defense Programs. H.R. 3338, as passed by the House on November 28, supported many of the funding priorities recommended by the President – most notably those for defense and those for investigation and law enforcement programs largely managed by the Justice Department. (Table 2, above.)H.R. 3338, however, recommended significant increases in a few non-defense areas: 7 ! Additional resources for New York – The House adopted an amendment that represented the agreement reached on November 19 between Representative Walsh and the White House shifting $2.1 billion in the Committee-reported bill to meet the most urgent needs of New York. (Since some of the shifted funds would have already been allocated for needs in New York City, the net effect of the Walsh amendment was to increase New York regional funding by about $1.5 billion.) The cornerstone of the amendment was the addition of $1.825 billion in HUD Community Development Block Grants aid New York businesses recover from the terrorist attacks. The amendment further added $175 million for worker compensation processing and claims programs in New York state. To accommodate these increases, the amendment eliminated $1.5 billion in Department of Labor National Emergency Grants to States to aid dislocated workers nationally and cut FEMA debris removal and reconstruction programs by $555 million.7 ! Bioterrorism spending would rise by nearly $600 million – to $2.16 billion – including a new $100 million initiative to support state and local government preparedness planning. The House reduced amounts for the National Pharmaceutical Stockpile by $50 million based on savings negotiated for the costs of antibiotics to treat individuals exposed to anthrax and other bacterial infections. ! Counterterrorism aid to state and local governments under the Justice Department’s Justice Assistance Program would receive $400 million. The Administration had not requested these funds. ! Aviation security would grow by $75 million in total above the Administration’s request, including several new initiatives: $233 million for more Sky Marshals; $28.5 million for FAA security demonstration projects; and $30 million for FAA hiring of “security experts.” These additions were offset by a reduction from $300 The House rejected (201-220) an amendment by Representative George Miller that would have restricted the use of the $1.825 billion in Community Development Block Grants to extending unemployment benefits and health insurance for unemployed workers. Some lawmakers were concerned that the transfer of funds from the Labor Department’s program for dislocated workers to HUD’s community block grant program for New York would adversely affect unemployed individuals throughout the United States. The Miller amendment would have effectively reoriented the use of the $1.825 billion in Community Development Block Grants to the purposes originally proposed for the Labor Department’s grants for dislocated workers. CRS-13 million to $50 million for aircraft cockpit door security. The House Appropriations Committee believed that most funding for cockpit security would not be needed until permanent door designs had been developed, something that might not occur for 18 months. ! In addition to other aviation security measures, passenger and baggage screening activities would receive a $1.25 billion appropriation, funds which would be fully offset by fees collected from passengers and airlines that were authorized in P.L. 107-71, the Aviation Security Act. H.R. 3338, as reported, provided $1 billion for these purposes, an amount that was increased by $250 million through a floor amendment by Representative Inslee. The House-passed bill also proposed reductions to the President’s non-defense request, including: ! Dislocated workers assistance ($2 billion) was eliminated. (See “Additional resources New York” above and footnote 7.) Prior to the shift of these funds to economic development needs in New York, the House Appropriation Committee had cut the request back to $1.5 billion, noting that the President had pledged an extra $1 billion for National Emergency Grants to assist such workers in FY2003, and that the House-passed Economic Stimulus bill (H.R. 3090) included $12.2 billion in additional funding to aid unemployed persons with health benefit costs and states with costs related to unemployment benefits. ! FEMA grants of $550 million to states and localities for first responder training and equipment were not included in H.R. 3338, as passed by the House. The House Committee said that a grant program for first responders already existed in the Department of Justice and that it was not necessary to establish a new program in FEMA. ! FEMA disaster relief aid was cut from $4.9 billion to $4.345 billion in order to increase funding for economic recovery in New York. Also during House floor consideration, two amendments by Representative Obey and Representative Lowey, identical to proposals rejected in Committee markup for additional funding for homeland security and New York, were offered but ruled out of order. More details on the actions taken by Congress in H.R. 3338 of non-defense funding are shown in the tables attached to this report in the appendix. House Consideration of the Defense Request. Although the House provided the same amount as requested by the Administration for the Department of Defense – $7.3 billion – H.R. 3338 shifted over $600 million in funding from the allocation proposed by the Administration to reflect House priorities. CRS-14 Indicating its policy priorities, the House Appropriations Committee added funds in the following areas: ! ! ! ! ! ! ! $79 million for precision guided munitions; $145 million for equipment for special operations forces; $105 million for chemical-biological protection projects; $40 million for the Former Soviet Union Threat Reduction programs; $163 million for spares and depot maintenance and medical supplies; $80 million for military construction projects; and $25 million for initial crisis response. The House Committee argued that these additions could be funded within the Administration’s total by reducing funding in other parts of the Administration’s request for DOD, either in the $1.67 billion already included in the regular FY2002 DOD bill, or in other allocations from the emergency supplemental.8 Senate Committee Markup of the $20 billion Terrorism Emergency Supplemental. Like the House, the Senate Appropriations Committee considered the $20 billion request as part of the Defense Appropriation bill. At markup on December 4, the Committee reported legislation, adding $15 billion proposed by Senator Byrd, Chairman of the Appropriations Committee. Half of the increased spending targeted homeland security activities while the other half provided $7.5 billion in FEMA disaster relief grants for New York, Virginia, and Pennsylvania. The Committee-reported bill approved the full amount ($7.3 billion) requested for the Defense Department, and closely mirrored major elements of the non-defense portion of the House-passed bill. In addition to the $7.5 billion FEMA funding, intended mostly to help New York, H.R. 3338, as reported by the Senate panel included significantly higher amounts in several areas above those recommended by the President and what passed the House earlier. Resources for bioterrorism were set at $3.8 billion, more than twice as much as proposed by the Administration and 75% more than approved by the House. Border security, especially along the northern boundary with Canada, received nearly $600 million more than requested or passed in the House. The Senate Committee recommendation further included $500 million more that requested or House-passed levels for securing nuclear power plants and federal facilities, including counter-proliferation measures to prevent theft of Russian nuclear weapons and keep Russian nuclear specialists employed in appropriate jobs. H.R. 3338, as reported in the Senate, also added a new initiative of $875 million to assist the Postal Service respond to anthrax and other terrorist attacks. Senate Consideration of the Non-Defense Request. As the Senate debate began on H.R. 3338, a number of Senators objected to the extra $15 billion 8 Additional funds are available to DOD to combat terrorism in the funds provided in earlier allocations as executed transfers or in 15-day wait transfers (see Appendix). See also discussion of Title IX in H.Rept. 107-298. CRS-15 funding for homeland security and New York. In a procedural motion, the Senate voted to remove the emergency designation for the additional $15 billion. By doing so, the homeland security and New York funds were added to other non-emergency funding in the bill. This pushed the total amount appropriated over the allowable allocation for H.R. 3338 and made the entire Senate Committee recommendation subject to a point of order. Subsequently, the Senate adopted a compromise amendment offered by Senators Byrd, Stevens, and Inouye that reduced the emergency anti-terrorism spending to $20 billion but retained many of the program spending priorities identified in the Committee recommendation, although at lower amounts. As adopted by the Senate, H.R. 3338 included sharp differences with levels proposed by the President and approved by the House. Among the most significant disparities were the resource shares recommended for defense, recovery efforts in New York and elsewhere, and security of facilities and the border. The House measure, like the President’s request, allocated 37% to defense while the Senate bill provided 10% of the $20 billion appropriation. Debris removal, construction, and other recovery activities received 23% under the House version of the supplemental total, while the Senate proposed a 32% share. Security of infrastructure, nuclear facilities, airports, and U.S. borders accounted for roughly 10% of the House-passed bill, while the Senate allocated nearly 16%. Other specific recommendations made by the Senate that differ from the President and the House include: ! Bioterrorism – $3 billion, nearly twice the amount recommended by the White House and 41% more than approved in the House. ! New York recovery – $5.82 billion in FEMA disaster relief aid compared with $4.9 billion requested and $4.35 billion passed by the House. Senate and House bills included $2 billion and $1.825 billion, respectively, for HUD Community Development Block Grants. The White House had not proposed additional funds. ! Border security – $842 million for the Immigration and Naturalization Service and for Customs to enhance security, especially along the norther border. The House approved $811 million and the President had proposed $507 million. ! Aviation security – Senate and House bills provided roughly the same amount for aviation security – about $500 million – but the Senate measure allocated half to upgrade aircraft cockpit security while the House bill emphasized resources for Sky Marshals and security equipment for baggage and passenger screening. The President had proposed $415 million for airline security, mostly to upgrade cockpit doors. ! Investigation and law enforcement – $2.4 billion, about double what was requested and passed by the House. The Senate measure added over $100 million for FBI investigative activities and included $220 million for Justice Department law enforcement aid to New Jersey, northern Virginia, and Maryland. Both House and Senate CRS-16 bills included $400 million in counterterrorism assistance to state and local governments that was not requested by the White House. In order to provide these additional resources without exceeding the $20 billion total, the Senate bill reduced DOD funding from $7.3 billion to $2 billion (see below). Senate Consideration of the Defense Request. Under the Byrd, Stevens, Inouye amendment that was adopted on the Senate floor, the Department of Defense would have received $2 billion of the $20 billion included in the Senate bill, a reduction of $5.3 billion from the funding included in the House bill and from the Administration’s request. Of that $2 billion, $475 million was designated as military construction funding to be used for reconstruction and renovation of the Pentagon. The bill did not specify where the remaining $1.53 billion would be spent among the categories developed by the Administration to describe DOD spending; those categories range from funding for the Afghan conflict to increased funding of intelligence and surveillance activities (see Table 3 below). Under the President’s proposed allocations, the Defense Department would have received a total of $21.1 billion, the largest share of both the total funding available under the supplemental (53%) and of the $20 billion supplemental request considered by Congress (37%). Under the Senate bill, however, DOD’s share of the $40 billion was to total $15.7 billion or 39% of total supplemental funding, smaller than proposed by the House or the Administration. Of that $15.7 billion, $13.7 billion was already available to Defense from the first $20 billion allocated by the President; the remaining $2 billion was in the Senate bill.9 Secretary of Defense Rumsfeld called on Congress to give DOD the entire $7.3 billion requested by the President in order to “maintain the president’s priorities for fighting this war [in Afghanistan],” and to ensure that DOD would not need to curtail training and operations.10 In floor debate, Senator Stevens suggested that the Department of Defense had already received a large increase of over $42 billion compared to the previous year, and that, under the emergency supplemental, the President could submit requests for additional supplementals for any further requirements to combat terrorism. Senator Stevens also mentioned that the Department of Defense had authority under the Food and Forage Act (Section 3732 or Title 41 U.S.C. Section 11) to obligate monies in advance of appropriations for emergency expenses.11 DOD also had already been allotted $3.6 billion for expenses associated with the conflict in Afghanistan from the first $20 billion distributed by the President (see Table 3 below). 9 Of that $13.7 billion, $5.6 billion was available immediately and $8.1 billion became available on November 25, 2001 at the latest, 15 days after the President submitted the proposed allocation to Congress. 10 National Journal’s Congress Daily, “House Democrats Demand More Funding for Homeland,” December 11, 2001. 11 For Senator Steven’s statement, see Congressional Record, December 6, 2001, p. S12515. The Department of Defense invoked its authority to use the Food and Forage Act on September 16, 2001 but no obligations have been incurred by the services. DOD can also transfer funds using reprogramming authority. CRS-17 Table 3 shows the allocation of funds using the categories developed by the Administration for the defense requests, ranging from support for the conflict in Afghanistan to repair and renovation of the Pentagon, and compares the amounts provided by the House, Senate, and the enacted bill with the Administration’s request. Unlike submissions by other agencies and normal budget proposals, the funding for DOD was appropriated to a central fund, the Defense Emergency Response Fund, rather than to individual appropriation accounts in order to give DOD additional flexibility and to ensure separate tracking of these emergency funds.12 If necessary, DOD could, for example, transfer additional funds from one category to “Worldwide Military Posture,” the category that provides monies for the conflict in Afghanistan or for additional training (see Table 3 below).13 Conference Committee Consideration and Enactment of the $20 Billion Emergency Supplemental. On December 20, 2001, Congress cleared for the White House H.R. 3338, including $20 billion in emergency supplemental spending for homeland security, increased defense needs, and other efforts to combat terrorism. The President signed the legislation on January 10, 2002 (P.L. 107-117). The enacted package, however, differs significantly from what had been proposed in mid-October for allocating the second $20 billion. The legislation roughly doubles the request for bioterrorism, law enforcement, and infrastructure security activities, while reducing by more than half the $7.3 billion proposed for defense. The final compromise – to increase homeland security and New York aid and decrease defense resources – partially accommodates the position of those who sought more spending for domestic programs, but without exceeding $20 billion. (See Table 2 and Figure 6, above.) Conference Agreement for Non-Defense Funds. P.L. 107-117 follows much of the framework proposed by the Senate: transfer of defense resources to fund homeland security and recovery needs. Major non-defense elements of the conference agreement include: ! Bioterrorism – $2.84 billion, nearly double the Administration’s $1.59 billion request. The conference agreement includes $593 million for the National Pharmaceutical Stockpile and $512 million for smallpox vaccine, both as requested, but adds $865 million for the Center for Disease Control (CDC) to help state and local jurisdictions upgrade their capacity. The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases also receives $155 million for bioterrorism research and the construction of biosafety labs, activities that were not requested by the White House. ! Recovery for New York and other affected areas – $8.2 billion, slightly higher than the amount proposed by the President, but 12 In the enacted version of the bill, funds in the Defense Emergency Response Fund can be transferred to the services for expenses incurred by other appropriations for the purposes of the Emergency Terrorism Response supplemental, including emergency costs incurred between September 11 and September 30, 2001, under the Food and Forage Act. 13 DOD would need to get approval from OMB for such transfers. CRS-18 programmed in a way that more directly targets New York. H.R. 3338, as enacted, includes $2 billion in Community Development Block Grants (funds that were not requested) to aid in New York City economic recovery. FEMA receives $4.36 billion for various reconstruction, repair, and clean-up activities, somewhat less than the $4.9 billion requested. Funding (not requested) for reimbursing hospitals affected by the attacks totals $140 million. The conference agreement follows House- and Senate-passed bills by deleting the $2 billion request for Department of Labor National Emergency Grants to States to assist dislocated workers and substituting $32 million specifically for worker support organizations in New York City. The House Appropriations Committee estimates that amounts provided in P.L. 107-117 for recovery efforts in New York and other jurisdictions, when combined with previously allocated funds, will bring the total to $11.2 billion out of the entire $40 billion supplemental. ! Border security – $759 million, mostly for the Coast Guard and the Immigration and Naturalization Service to upgrade border and port security. The President had requested about $600 million. The conference agreement includes $99.6 million for the INS, as proposed by the Senate, for construction needs, especially along the northern border. ! Aviation security – $540 million, one-third higher than the $405 million requested. The conference agreement accommodates differing priorities of House- and Senate-passed bills by including $108.5 million for the accelerated purchase of airport security equipment (House priority) and $100 million to upgrade aircraft cockpit doors (Senate priority). P.L. 107-117, however, does not include $1.25 billion as proposed by the House, for passenger and baggage screening that would have been paid for by user fees collected from passengers and airlines. ! Counterterrorism aid – $2.1 billion, 75% more than the $1.2 billion request. The conference agreement includes $745 million for the FBI, more than requested and passed by either the House or Senate, and $400 million for counterterrorism aid to state and local governments, as proposed in both bills but not in the request. ! Postal Service assistance – $500 million to repair Postal Service facilities destroyed in the attacks, protect workers handling the mail, and establish a system to sanitize and screen the mail. The President had not requested additional Postal Service funds beyond the $175 million allocated from the first $20 billion portion of the supplemental. ! Securing nuclear materials – $226 million, including $135 million to secure nuclear materials at sites in Russia and other former Soviet CRS-19 states, and for nonproliferation programs aimed at retaining Russian nuclear scientists. Conference Agreement for Defense Funds. To accommodate higher funding for non-defense needs, P.L. 107-117 cuts the amount requested by the President for Defense from $7.3 billion to $3.5 billion. Although particular categories of defense spending to combat terrorism are reduced, the Administration’s overall programmatic priorities for DOD remain intact. Congress was also able to provide funding from other sources to offset the cuts (see discussion above and Table 3 below). The Administration has also signaled that it plans to request additional emergency funding for Defense later this winter.14 The major changes to the request are: 14 ! halving the funding for “increased situational awareness” (intelligence and surveillance activities) from $1.74 billion to $850 million; ! eliminating $881 million in funding for “enhanced force protection” (self-protection systems for weapons and protection to DOD facilities), offset in part by an increase of $478 million provided in the regular FY2002 DOD appropriations for similar activities; ! eliminating $219 million in funding for improved command and control; ! halving the funding for “increased worldwide posture” (funding for the Afghan war and DOD’s homeland defense activities) from $2.9 billion to $1.45 billion, although up to $1.64 billion can be transferred to those activities from regular FY2002 appropriations for RDT&E and procurement should it prove necessary (see discussion above); ! decreasing funding for “offensive counter-terrorism” (munitions) from $545 million to $372 million; ! decreasing funding for “initial crisis response” from $106 million to $39 million; ! reducing funding for repair and upgrade of the Pentagon from $925 million to $640 million, offset by a transfer of $300 million remaining in the emergency supplemental but not yet allocated by the President; and ! an increase of $104 million for military construction projects. James Dao, “Pentagon Seeking a large increase in its next budget, “ New York Times, January 7, 2002. CRS-20 To track the expenditure of these funds, Congress requires DOD to provide quarterly reports to the defense committees showing the appropriation accounts where funds have been transferred, obligations of those funds, and a forecast of expenditures. Because DOD’s funding is being provided in these unique and fairly general categories, the reports are to be more detailed, showing spending by project, and by categories for military personnel and operation and maintenance spending that have been used to report previous contingency operations. The reports are also to identify offsetting savings due to cancellation of peacetime training or other activities. The first report is due February 25, 2002, 45 days after enactment, and quarterly thereafter.15 Table 3. Congressional Action on DOD’s Share of $20 Billion Supplemental As of December 20, 2001 In millions of dollars Category As percent of total Admin. House Senate P.L. Admin. P.L. Requesta Actiona Actiona 107-117 Request 107-117 1,735 1,735 NSc 850 23.6% 24.3% Enhanced Force Protection 881 743 NSc 0 12.0% 0.0% Improved Command and Control 219 162 NSc 0 3.0% 0.0% 2,938 2,801 NSc 1,495 40.0% 42.7% Offensive Counterterrorism 545 769 NSc 372 7.4% 10.6% Initial Crisis Response 106 108 NSc 39 1.4% 1.1% Pentagon Repair and Upgradeb 925 925 475 640 12.6% 18.3% 0 0 NSc 0 0.0% 0.0% 0 0 c NS 0 0.0% 0.0% 0 105 0 104 0.0% 3.0% 0 [30] 0 [130] NA NA 0 0 0 [1,648] NA NA 7,349 7,348 Increased Situational Awareness Increased Worldwide Posture Airport Security Other d Other military constructione Transfersf Potential transfers DOD Total g 2,000 3,500 100.0% 100.0% NS = Not specified. Notes: a. P.L. 107-38, theFY2001Emergency Terrorism Response supplemental (ETR) provides that a total of $10 billion is available immediately (‘cash’), another $10 billion is available 15 days after 15 See H.Rept. 107-350, p. 425; the conference report references the House bill for reporting requirements, see H.Rept. 107-298, p. 295, and Section 3012 of the House version of H.R. 3338. CRS-21 the request is submitted to Congress, and $20 billion is available to agencies after being enacted in a subsequent appropriations act. b. H.R. 3338 transfers $300 million in ‘cash’ resources remaining in the emergency supplemental (P.L. 107-38) for reconstruction, and hardening of command centers in the Pentagon; these funds were to be distributed by the President. c. Except for the Pentagon, the Senate-passed version of H.R. 3338 does not specify how individual categories would be affected. d. The category ‘other’ includes potential increases in fuel costs. e. Funding added by Congress for military construction. f. The House and conference version of H.R. 3338 transfers $30 million of DOD funds to the Former Soviet Union Threat Reduction appropriation in the Department of State, and the conference version also provides up to $100 million for military and logistical support to Pakistan and Jordan for their support in the Afghan war. g. Section 306 of the conference version provides that up to 1.5% of the total in FY2002 funding for RDT&E and procurement can be transferred to support the Afghan war (Operation Enduring Freedom) or DOD’s homeland defense activities (Operation Noble Anvil). Sources: P.L. 107-38, 2001 Emergency Response to Combat Terrorism supplemental; OMB submissions on allocations for supplemental, dated September 21, 28, October 5, 16, 22, November 5, 9, 30, see [http://w3.access.gpo.gov/usbudget/FY2002/amndsup.html]; see also materials provided to Appropriations committees; House of Representatives, H.Rept. 107-299, Report of Committee on Appropriations to accompany H.R. 3338, DOD Appropriations Bill, 2001, and supplemental appropriations; U.S. Senate, S.Rept. 107-109, Report of Committee on Appropriations to accompany H.R. 3338, and Department of Defense Appropriation Bill, 2002, and supplemental appropriations, and H.Rept. 107-350, Conference report to accompany H.R. 3338, Department of Defense Appropriation Bill, and supplemental appropriations. CRS-22 Appendix A - Defense Funding Request Developed specifically for the anti-terrorism supplemental, the categories in Table A1 classify the funding requested for the Department of Defense in the Emergency Supplemental to Combat Terrorism according to broad purposes that are described below rather than by appropriation account, the normal structure for supplemental requests. Funds are to be deposited into the Defense Emergency Response Fund, but DOD may then transfer those funds into specific appropriation accounts. Below is a description of the types of activities funded in these categories and the rationale for the Administration’s allocation of funds. In the Administration’s request, the largest single request was $6.5 billion to support ongoing operations in Afghanistan – classified as “Increased worldwide posture.” That funding covered the cost of higher operating tempo for forces that are deployed, the cost of airlifting supplies and setting up operations, and additional pay for activating reservists and for active-duty forces (e.g. hazardous duty pay). According to DOD, that $6.5 billion request represented a rough estimate of the additional funding that might be necessary to conduct operations in Afghanistan for six months, or until mid-March, 2002. Since these funds are not specifically tagged for Afghanistan, the Administration can also use them for other operations, such as the deployment of U.S. troops to the Philippines. The request was designed to ensure that funding for operations in Afghanistan was covered until about mid-March, after the convening of the next session of Congress. With rapid and unpredictable changes in the situation in Afghanistan, any estimate of costs is uncertain. The second largest category of funding – $6 billion for “Increased situational awareness” – covered classified programs, including upgrades to reconnaissance platforms (aircraft, unmanned vehicles, communications stations) and improvements to intelligence collection and processing intelligence. An additional $2.4 billion was requested by DOD to purchase a variety of selfdefense weapons and sensors for ships, aircraft and other forces, upgrades to and more physical security systems at bases, and increases in the number of active-duty military personnel doing security duty at bases. Another $2 billion was requested to purchase additional precision-guided missiles and other munitions (Tomahawks, JDAMS, ALCMs, laser-guided bombs) that are being heavily used in the bombing attacks in Afghanistan. These expensive missiles are the ‘weapon of choice’ in conflicts where the military is particularly concerned about accurate targeting.16 Improvements to command and communication systems both within the military and connecting DOD to local, state, and federal governments would cost another $1.6 billion. Repair, renovation, and removal of debris at the Pentagon, as well as leasing 16 The funding level in the supplemental was set to buy the maximum number of missiles that could be produced by defense contractors in FY2002 rather than a specific estimate of the number that would be used in the conflict. CRS-23 of temporary space, was anticipated to cost another $1.5 billion. The initial response to the bombing of the World Trade Center, as well as new missions for the armed forces – conducting combat air patrols off the east and west coast, and stationing National Guard personnel at airports – was estimated to cost $1.1 billion. The Administration’s proposed additional funding for DOD appears to include a mixture of one-time or temporary expenses (such as the cost of the conflict in Afghanistan and repair of the Pentagon), accelerations in current programs now given higher priority, and recurring costs reflecting longer-term changes in standards (e.g. security at DOD facilities) or new missions (combat air patrol). In its review of the new FY2003 budget request, Congress may want to assess the extent to which funding needs to be increased for programs or activities that are designed to combat terrorism and protect DOD facilities and personnel, and the extent to which DOD’s missions and force structure need to be re-oriented to reflect the new emphasis on combating terrorism. CRS-24 Table A1. DOD Allocations under $40 Billion Emergency Terrorism Response Supplemental In millions of dollars a As percent of total 15day wait fundsa Admin. $20B request a Admin. total Enacted total Admin Total Enacted Description of category Category Cash Increased Situational Awareness 1,925 2,347 1,735 6,007 5,122 28.4% 29.6% Enhanced Force Protection 775 734 881 2,390 1,509 11.3% 8.7% Self-defense weapons for ships, aircraft, and other forces; physical security system upgrades, personnel alerting systems, and more security personnel. Improved Cmd and Control 666 737 219 1,622 1,403 7.7% 8.1% For connecting to local, state, and federal governments, and for military communication systems. Increased Worldwide Posture 890 2,492 2,938 6,320 4,877 29.9% 28.2% Funds increased operating tempo and higher personnel costs associated with Afghan war or related conflicts. Offensive Counterterrorism 252 1,207 545 2,004 1,831 9.5% 10.6% Additional buys of precision-guided missiles and other munitions Initial Crisis Response 523 76 106 705 648 3.3% 3.7% Costs of deploying ships and combat air patrols off coasts, DOD support to FEMA, and to NYC. Pentagon Repair and upgradeb 739 91 925 1,755 1,470 8.3% 8.5% Debris removal, engineering studies, repairs, and renovation. 30 231 0 261 261 1.2% 1.5% Funds National Guard providing airport security 100 0 0 100 100 0.5% 0.6% Potential cost of higher fuel prices. 104 0.0% 0.6% Military construction funding added by Congress. Airport security Otherc Other mil. con. Upgrades to reconnaissance aircraft, unmanned aerial vehicles, sensors, and classified programs. 0 0 0 0 d 0 0 0 0 [130] NA NA See note below. Potential transferse 0 0 0 0 [1,648] NA NA DOD can transfer up to 1.5% of total funding for RDT&E and procurement for Afghan war and homeland defense. 5,900 7,915 7,349 21,164 17,315 100.0% 100.0% Transfers DOD Totalf Not applicable CRS-25 Notes: a. P.L. 107-38, making emergency supplemental appropriations for FY2001 in response to the September 11, 2001 tragedy, provides that a total of $10 billion is available immediately, another $10 billion is available 15 days after the request is submitted to Congress, and $20 billion is available to agencies after being enacted in a subsequent appropriations act. b. H.R. 3338 allocates $300 million that was available for additional ‘cash’ transfers by the President to reconstruction and hardening of command centers in the Pentagon. c. The category ‘other’ includes potential increases in fuel costs. d. The conference version of H.R. 3338 transfers $30 million of DOD funds to the Former Soviet Union Threat Reduction appropriation in the Department of State, and provides that up to $100 million can be provided to Pakistan and Jordan for their military and logistic support in the Afghan war. e. Section 306 of H.R. 3338 provides that up to 1.5% of the total amount appropriated in FY 2002 for RDT&E and procurement can be transferred to support the Afghan war (Operation Enduring Freedom) or DOD’s homeland defense activities (Operation Noble Anvil). f. The total for the Administration includes the $300 million in ‘cash’ resources transferred by Congress for reconstruction of the Pentagon in H.R. 3338. Sources: P.L. 107-38, 2001 Emergency Response to Combat Terrorism Supplemental; OMB submissions on allocations for supplemental, dated September 21, 28, October 5, 16, 22, November 5, 9, 30, see [http://w3.access.gpo.gov/usbudget/FY2002/amndsup.html]; see also materials provided to Appropriations committees; House of Representatives, H.Rept. 107-299, Report of Committee on Appropriations to accompany H.R. 3338, DOD Appropriations Bill, 2001, and supplemental appropriations; U.S. Senate, S.Rept. 107-109, Report of Committee on Appropriations to accompany H.R. 3338, and Department of Defense Appropriation Bill, 2002, and supplemental appropriations, and H.Rept. 107-350, Conference report to accompany H.R. 3338, Department of Defense Appropriation Bill, and supplemental appropriations. See also, Tony Capaccio, “Emergency Defense Funds going to improve military intelligence,” [http://www.bloomberg.com], September 27, 2001; Frank Wolfe, “Zakheim: supplemental includes RC-135 Upgrades, Global Hawk Acceleration, Defense Daily, September 25, 2001; and “Zakheim: New Defense Spending in 2001 will lead to increases in 2002 and 2003,” Aerospace Daily, September 25, 2001, and CRS calculations. CRS-26 Appendix B – Non-Defense Emergency Supplemental Transfers Organized by Appropriations Bill and Account The following 13 tables provide details of the $40 billion emergency supplemental allocation, organized according to appropriation bills and accounts. For the $20 billion which Congress will enact in an FY2002 appropriation measure, amounts as approved in the House and Senate are included. CRS-27 Appendix – Summary of All Appropriations Bills ($s – millions) Appropriations Bill Agriculture and Related Agencies Executed Transfers (1st $10B) 15-Day/Wait Transfers (2nd $10B) Admin Request ($20B) House Senate Passed Enacted $574.0 $535.0 $73.2 $22.0 $147.3 $156.1 $230.2 $232.4 $1,342.6 $1,761.9 $2,424.4 $2,423.3 $5,899.3 $7,915.3 $7,349.0 $7,348.4 $2,000.0 $3,500.0 District of Columbia $6.0 $0.0 $25.0 $25.6 $200.0 $200.0 Energy and Water Development $5.0 $0.0 $287.0 $287.0 $574.0 $574.0 $861.5 $471.9 $3.1 Labor, Health/Human Services, Education Legislative Branch Commerce, Justice, State Defense and Military Construction Foreign Operations * $0.0 $0.0 $50.0 $0.0 $84.2 $88.2 $88.2 $88.2 $155.2 $0.0 $3,529.7 $2,240.4 $2,964.8 $2,894.1 $377.0 $0.0 $256.1 $256.1 $256.1 $256.1 $1,228.2 $483.5 $734.3 $734.4 $1,268.2 $1,296.5 Treasury, Postal Service, Executive Office of the President, and General Government $191.1 $175.0 $572.6 $572.0 $1,283.3 $1,283.3 Veterans Affairs, Housing and Urban Development, and Independent Agencies $970.2 $700.0 $5,672.4 $6,530.4 $8,366.9 $6,899.8 $10,000.0 $10,000.0 $20,000.0 $20,000.0 $20,000.0 $20,000.0 Interior Transportation TOTAL * Administration requested $50 million by transfer from the Department of State for USAID mission construction. House and Senate bills do not include this transfer, but the House bill provides $30 million transfer from the Department of State for the Biological Weapons Redirect and S&T Centers Program. Columns may not add due to rounding. CRS-28 Agriculture and Related Agencies ($s – millions) Purpose Executed Transfers (1st $10B) 15 Day/Wait Transfers (2nd $10B) Admin Request ($20B) House Passed Senate Passed Enacted Enhanced security of USDA facilities and expedited background investigations and security clearances – – $17.2 $7.5 $80.9 $80.9 Improve response to bioterrorist attack by state, local, federal, and private entities – – $5.0 – – – Agricultural Research Service, S&E Security upgrades and research on bioterrorism – – – $5.6 $70.0 $40.0 Agricultural Research Service, Buildings and Facilities Improvements in locations with a mission related to exotic and other animal diseases – – $0.0 $0.0 $73.0 $73.0 Cooperative State Research, Ed, and Extension Services, R&Ed Research related to bioterrorism and homeland security – – $0.0 $0.0 $50.0 $0.0 Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, S&E Agriculture Inspection Quarantine user fee and inspection programs, and pest detection activities – – $0.0 $8.2 $95.0 $105.0 Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, Building and Facilities Construct research facility for biohazardous material and relocate animal disease facility in Ames, Iowa – – $14.1 $14.1 $14.1 $14.1 Appropriation Account Dept. of Agriculture Office of the Secretary CRS-29 Appropriation Account Purpose Executed Transfers (1st $10B) 15 Day/Wait Transfers (2nd $10B) Admin Request ($20B) House Passed Senate Passed Enacted – – $8.9 $9.8 $15.0 $15.0 Food and Safety Inspection Service Improve response to food supply threats and other bioterrorism protection activities, including implementation of the Food Safety Bioterrorism Protection Program Food and Nutrition Service, WIC Supplemental to higher caseloads than expected for FY2002 – – $0.0 $0.0 $39.0 $39.0 PL 480 food aid grants Purchase and deliver food to Afghans $73.0 $22.0 – – – – Expedite FDA vaccine/biologic approval – – $34.6a $34.6 $127.0 $40.8 Increased safety of imported foods – – $61.0a $61.0 Dept of Health and Human Services Public Health and Social Services Emergency Fund Increased security at FDA buildings Commodity Futures Trading Commission Reestablishing NY office and relocating staff TOTAL Agriculture and Related Agencies a. Requested as part of the Labor/HHS/Education chapter. b. Funded within $127 million total above. Sources: OMB and House and Senate Appropriations Committees. b b $97.1 $13.2 – – $0.0 $8.8 $0.2 – $6.5 $6.5 $10.0 $16.9 $73.2 $22.0 $156.1 $574.0 $535.0 $147.3 CRS-30 Commerce, Justice, and State, the Judiciary, and Related Agencies ($s – millions) Appropriation Account Purpose Executed Transfers (1st $10B) 15 Day/Wait Transfers (2nd $10B) Admin Request ($20B) House Passed Senate Passed Enacted Commerce Department Dept Management, S&E Building security upgrades – – $7.3 $8.6 $0.9 $4.8 Economic Development Admin., S&E Increased security at facilities – – $0.3 $0.0 $0.3 $0.0 Economic Development Admin., Econ Development Asst Programs Support economic and development activities in Northern Virginia $2.0 – – – – – International Trade Administration Relocation of staff from WTC offices $0.1 – – – – – Security enhancements in U.S. and overseas posts – – $1.5 $0.8 $1.5 $1.0 Export Administration Funds for attaches in UAE and China to monitor shipments of dual-use items – – $1.8 $1.8 $1.8 $1.8 National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Security at satellite control facilities – – $2.0 $0.0 $2.0 $2.0 Oversight of commercial remote sensing licenses – – $0.8 $0.8 $0.8 $0.8 U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, S&E Security at office facilities – – $3.4 $0.0 $3.4 $1.5 National Institute of Standards and Technology Security police at facilities in MD and CO – – $0.4 $0.0 $0.4 $0.0 Video surveillance and building access controls at facilities in MD and CO – – $1.2 $0.0 $1.2 $1.2 Cybersecurity initiative – – $0.0 $0.0 $10.0 $5.0 CRS-31 Executed Transfers (1st $10B) 15 Day/Wait Transfers (2nd $10B) Admin Request ($20B) House Passed Senate Passed Enacted – – $8.3 $8.3 $8.3 $8.3 $2.1 – $27.0 $20.3 $30.6 $26.4 – – $3.5 $3.5 $3.5 $3.5 – – $0.0 $0.0 $25.0 $5.0 $3.9 – – – – – Witness protection safe sites and other security measures – – $11.1 $11.1 $26.1 $10.2 U.S. Marshals, Construction U.S. Marshals construction – – $0.0 $0.0 $35.0 $9.1 General Legal Activities, S&E Criminal Division costs for intl legal activities – – $4.8 $4.8 $2.4 $4.8 Cybersecurity initiative – – $0.0 $0.0 $15.0 $0.0 $7.3 – – – – – Additional costs of the Special Master’s Office victim compensation activities – – $7.7 $7.7 $3.9 $7.7 Establish anti-terrorism task forces in selected judicial districts – – $67.1 $68.5 $7.1 $45.0 Appropriation Account Purpose Natl Telecommunications and Info Admin Grants to public broadcasters to restore facilities destroyed in WTC attack Subtotal Commerce Department Justice Department General Administration, Admin Review and Appeals Additional adjudication expense for Office of Immigration Review General Administration, Patriot Act Activities Feasibility report and implementation of enhanced FBI and other identification systems U.S. Marshals, S&E Increased airport and courthouse security Establish the Special Master’s office to coordinate WTC and Pentagon victims compensation U.S. Attorneys, S&E CRS-32 Appropriation Account Executed Transfers (1st $10B) 15 Day/Wait Transfers (2nd $10B) Admin Request ($20B) Investigation and prosecution costs, and renovation of NYC offices – – $7.5 Victims’ assistance – – $0.0 Purpose House Passed a $0.0 Senate Passed Enacted $7.5 $7.5 $14.3 $2.0 b $1.9 Crisis response equipment for NYC – – $0.0 $0.0 Courtroom technology – – $0.0 $0.0 $20.0 $0.0 Legal Activities Office Automation Systems – – $0.0 $0.0 $25.7 $0.0 $36.9 – – – – – Upgrade info technology infrastructure – $39.7 – – – – Investigation of terrorist attacks, including cybersecurity initiative – – $538.5 $538.5 $654.5 $745.0 INS operations responding to terrorist attacks and address INS screening deficiencies – – $399.4 $243.7 $360.1 $360.1 Northern border inspection operations – – $165.9 $79.7 $79.7 More Southwest border patrol agents – – – – $10.0 $10.0 Immigration and Naturalization Service, Construction Construction, repair, one-time build out, with emphasis on northern border – – $0.0 $0.0 $99.6 $99.6 Office of Justice Programs, State and Local Law Enforcement Assistance Grant to Utah Olympic Public Safety Command for security at 2002 games – – $4.4 $17.1 $17.0 $17.1 Law enforcement assistance grants to Northern VA, New Jersey, and MD – – $0.0 $0.0 $219.9 $229.0 Byrne Discretionary Grant Program for cybersecurity initiative – – $0.0 $0.0 $9.0 $5.0 FBI, S&E Immigration and Naturalization Service, S&E Office of Justice Programs, State and Local Law Enforcement Asst Investigation of terrorist attacks c CRS-33 Appropriation Account Purpose Executed Transfers (1st $10B) 15 Day/Wait Transfers (2nd $10B) Admin Request ($20B) House Passed Senate Passed Enacted Office of Justice Programs, Justice Assistance Counterterrorism aid to state and local governments – – $0.0 $400.0 $400.0 $400.0 Office of Justice Programs, Crimes Victims Fund Counseling for terrorist attack victims, families, and crisis responders – – $68.1 $68.1 $68.1 $68.1 $48.1 $39.7 $1,112.1 $1,528.9 $2,103.4 $2,110.3 $0.4 – – – – – Hiring new Diplomatic Security agents – $30.0 – – – – Media outreach to Muslim audiences – $15.0 – – – – Emergency medical supplies – $4.0 – – – – Counterterrorism Foreign Emergency Support Team Equipment – $1.0 – – – – Intl component in next Top Officials training in biological terrorism simulation – $3.0 – – – – Counterterrorism Coordinator staff – $2.2 – – – – Security enhancements at facilities – $34.7 – – – – Diplomatic security and mail safety – $10.0 – – – – Medical service enhancements – $3.7 Subtotal Justice Department State Department Diplomatic and Consular Programs Embassy Security/Construction Capital Investment Fund Potential evacuation at high-threat posts – – – – d – – – – Security at U.S. embassies – $24.9 Emergency egress projects – $18.0 – – – – Improved communications $7.5 $7.5 – – – – CRS-34 Executed Transfers (1st $10B) 15 Day/Wait Transfers (2nd $10B) Admin Request ($20B) House Passed Senate Passed Enacted Rewards for terrorist information and potential evacuation at high-threat posts $41.0 – – – – – DOD reimbursement for transportation – $10.0 – – – – Increase VOA and RFE/RL broadcasts – $12.3 $0.0 $9.2 $0.0 $9.2 $1.6 – – – – – – $16.4 $0.0 $10.0 $0.0 $10.0 $8.6 – – – – – $59.1 $192.7 $0.0 $19.2 $0.0 $19.2 $1.3 – – – – – – – $10.0 $10.0 $30.0 $30.0 $19.7 – – – – – Court security officers – – $17.5 $17.5 $53.5 $53.5 Reimburse US Marshals for staff coordinating security at courts – – $4.0 $4.0 $4.0 $4.0 Emergency communications back-up – – $0.0 $0.0 $5.0 $5.0 Enhance security at Thurgood Marshall Federal Judiciary Building – – $0.0 $0.0 $2.9 $2.9 Appropriation Account Emergencies in Diplomatic/Consular Service International Broadcasting Operations Purpose Broadcasting by the Afghan govt. International Broadcasting Capital Improvements Establish AM transmitting facilities in Middle East and additional FM capability Broadcasting by the Afghan govt. Subtotal State Department Judicial Branch Supreme Court, Care of Buildings and Grounds Protective window film Security of the Supreme Court Court of Appeals, District Courts, and Other Administrative Offices of the U.S. Courts, S&E Small Business Administration Court security CRS-35 Executed Transfers (1st $10B) 15 Day/Wait Transfers (2nd $10B) Admin Request ($20B) House Passed Senate Passed Enacted Low interest disaster loans ($400 million) for victims in affected areas $100.0 – – – – – Low interest loans ($600 million) for affected firms in NY, VA, and Penn. – – $150.0 $140.0 $150.0 $150.0 Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, S&E Reconstruct destroyed office and files – – $1.3 $1.3 $1.3 $1.3 Securities and Exchange Commission, S&E Replace NY office – – $20.7 $20.7 $20.7 $20.7 Dept of Transportation, Maritime Admin, Ops and Training Port security – – $0.0 $0.0 $11.0 $0.0 Maritime Guaranteed Loan Program Account Port security, infrastructure upgrades, and equipment – – $0.0 $0.0 $12.0 $0.0 $230.3 $232.4 $1,342.6 $1,761.9 $2,424.4 $2,423.3 Appropriation Account Disaster Loans Program Purpose TOTAL, Commerce/Justice/State a. b. c. d. Included in the $68.5 million line above. Included in the $14.3 million line above. Included in the $399.4 million line above. On August 13, 2002, the President reallocated $10 million from State Department embassy security in order to provide funds for FAA security costs at air traffic control facilities. Previously, the President had allocated $34.9 million for embassy security. e. Reallocated on June 4, 2002, from an earlier allocation for DOD initial crisis response. Sources: OMB and House and Senate Appropriations Committees. CRS-36 Defense and Military Construction ($s – millions) Programs Increased situational awareness Purpose Upgrades to intelligence assets and classified programs Executed Transfers (1st $10B) 15 Day/Wait Transfers (2nd $10B) Admin Request ($20B) House Passed Senate Passed Enacted $1,931.5 $2,347.0 $1,735.0 $1,735.0 NS $850.0 Enhanced force protection Self-defense weapons for ships and aircraft, and physical security systems for facilities $775.0 $734.0 $881.0 $848.4 NS $0.0 Improved command and control Improving military communication systems $659.0 $737.0 $219.0 $162.0 NS $0.0 Increased worldwide posture Costs of the conflict in Afghanistan $890.0 $2,492.0 $2,938.0 $2,801.0 NS $1,495.0 Offensive counterterrorism Purchasing precision-guided munitions $252.0 $1,207.0 $545.0 $769.0 NS $372.0 a $76.0 $106.0 $108.0 NS $39.1 Initial crisis response NYC aid and combat air patrols off coasts $522.8 Pentagon repair and upgrade Debris removal, repair, and renovation $739.0b $91.0 $925.0 $925.0c $475.0c $475.0 Airport security Stationing National Guard at airports $30.0 $231.0 – – – – $100.0 – – – – $269.4 $5,899.3 $7,915.0 $7,349.0 $7,348.4 $2,000.0 $3,500.0 Other Higher fuel costs and Pentagon relocation TOTAL Defense and Military Construction d NS = Not Specified a. On May 31, 2002, the President reallocated $10.2 million of this amount for International Broadcasting in Afghanistan. The original allocation for initial crisis response was $533 million. b. H.R. 3338, as enacted, allocates $300 million from the remaining unallocated $10 billion provided in P.L. 107-38 for reconstruction and hardening of Pentagon command centers. c. Includes funding appropriated in the Military Construction chapter in the House and Senate bills. d. Higher fuel costs. e. Pentagon relocation and other projects, including funds provided under the Military Construction chapter of H.R. 3338. Sources: OMB and House and Senate Appropriation Committees. CRS-37 District of Columbia ($s – millions) Purpose Executed Transfers (1st $10B) 15 Day/Wait Transfers (2nd $10B) Admin Request ($20B) House Passed Senate Passed Enacted Federal support for Economic Development and Management Reform in the District Short-term response activities, including police, fire, and public works overtime costs $6.0 – – – – – Federal Payment to DC for Emergency Response and Planning Develop and implement emergency response plan – – $25.0 a a a Protective clothing/breathing apparatus – – – $12.1 $7.1 $7.1 Hazardous materials equipment – – – $1.0 $1.0 $1.0 Chemical and biological weapons preparedness – – – $10.4 $10.4 $10.4 Pharmaceuticals for responders – – – $2.1 $2.1 $2.1 Response and communications capability – – – $0.0 $15.0 $15.0 Search, rescue, and other emergency equipment and support – – – $0.0 $8.9 $8.9 Equipment, supplies, vehicles for Chief Medical Officer – – – $0.0 $1.8 $1.8 Hospital containment facilities for the Health Department – – – $0.0 $8.0 $8.0 Appropriation Account CRS-38 Executed Transfers (1st $10B) 15 Day/Wait Transfers (2nd $10B) Admin Request ($20B) House Passed Senate Passed Enacted First response land-line and wireless interoperability project – – – $0.0 $44.0 $45.5 Emergency traffic management – – – $0.0 $20.7 $20.7 Emergency training and planning – – – $0.0 $11.4 $9.9 Increased facility security – – – $0.0 $25.5 $25.5 Federal Payment to Washington Metro Area Transit Authority Region-wide security requirements – – $0.0 $0.0 $39.1 $39.1 Federal Payment to Washington Council of Governments Regional emergency preparedness – – $0.0 $0.0 $5.0 $5.0 $6.0 $0.0 $25.0 $25.6 $200.0 $200.0 Appropriation Account Purpose TOTAL District of Columbia a. Funding included in lines below. Sources: OMB and House and Senate Appropriations Committees. CRS-39 Energy and Water Development ($s – millions) Appropriation Account Executed Transfers (1st $10B) 15 Day/Wait Transfers (2nd $10B) Admin Request ($20B) House Passed Senate Passed Enacted $5.0 – – – – – On-site security and plant reconfiguration at defense-related national labs – – $91.0 $73.0 $116.0 $76.0 Transportation safeguards to prevent sabotage of stockpile material in transit – – $15.0 $15.0 $15.0 $25.0 Accelerated deployment of cybersecurity measures at nuclear weapons sites – – $0.0 $0.0 $0.0 $30.0 Prototype Biological Aerosol Sentry and Information System – – $0.0 $18.0 $0.0 – – $0.0 $0.0 $226.0 $226.0 – – $3.3 $3.3 $3.3 $3.3 Purpose Energy Department Natl Nuclear Security Administration, Weapons Activities Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Enhance security at DOE national labs Safeguarding and acquisition of Russian/ former Soviet fissile nuclear material, and to help transition and retention of Russian nuclear scientists Environmental and Other Defense Activities, Defense Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Protective force personnel at the Plutonium Finishing Plant and the radioactive tanks at Hanford, WA a CRS-40 Appropriation Account Purpose Protective force personnel at the Savannah River site Environmental and Other Defense Activities, Other Defense Activities Increased security and accelerated deployment of the civilian Biological Aerosol Sentry and Info System Nuclear Regulatory Commission Prevent/mitigate attacks on commercial nuclear reactors and security for the trans-port of commercial nuclear materials Executed Transfers (1st $10B) 15 Day/Wait Transfers (2nd $10B) Admin Request ($20B) House Passed Senate Passed Enacted – – $4.9 $4.9 $4.9 $4.9 – – $3.5 $3.5 $3.5 $3.5 – – $0.0 $0.0 $36.0 $36.0 Bureau of Reclamation, Water and Related Resources Security at dams, power plants and other critical facilities – – $30.3 $30.3 $30.3 $30.3 Corps of Engineers, O&M, General Security at 300 Corps facilities, including overtime and personnel costs – – $139.0 $139.0 $139.0 $139.0 $5.0 $0.0 $287.0 $287.0 $574.0 $574.0 TOTAL Energy and Water Development a. Included in $226 million amount below. Sources: OMB and House and Senate Appropriations Committees. CRS-41 Foreign Operations ($s – millions) Appropriation Account Purpose Executed Transfers (1st $10B) 15 Day/Wait Transfers (2nd $10B) Admin Request ($20B) House Passed Senate Passed Enacted Export-Import Bank Relocate NYC office $0.1 – – – – – USAID Operating Expenses Evacuation plans and communications $0.7a – – – – – Security enhancements overseas $13.0 $2.0 – – – – – – $50 by transfer $0.0 $0.0 $0.0 Establish a USAID mission in Afghanistan $1.7a – – – – – Humanitarian aid in Afghanistan $76.0 $20.0 – – – – Reconstruction and humanitarian activities in Afghanistan – – $0.0 $0.0 $0.0 $50.0 $500.0 $100.0 – – – – Construction of buildings in Uganda and Kenya, by transfer from State Dept USAID Disaster Assistance Economic Support Fund Economic support for Pakistan Intl Narcotics and Law Enforcement Improved Pakistani border security – $73.0 – – – – Independent States, Former Soviet Union Economic and law enforcement aid for Uzbekistan $40.5 – – – – – Central Asia regional conflict prevention aid $6.0 – – – – – CRS-42 Appropriation Account Purpose Executed Transfers (1st $10B) 15 Day/Wait Transfers (2nd $10B) Admin Request ($20B) House Passed Senate Passed Enacted Foreign Military Financing Military aid for Turkey and Uzbekistan $45.0 – – – – – Non-Proliferation, Anti-Terrorism, Demining and Related programs Training/equipment for counterterrorism aid to foreign govts $45.5 – – – – – Training/equipment for border security forces in Central Asia $42.4 – – – – – Terrorist Interdiction Program $4.0 – – – – – Intl counterterrorism engagement $3.0 – – – – – Demining in Afghanistan $3.0 – – – – – $28.0 – – – – – Biological Weapons Redirect and S&T Centers Program – – – $30 by transfer $0.0 $0.0 Peacekeeping Operations Compensate Pakistan for costs in aiding U.S. military forces – $220.0 – – – – Peace Corps Evacuation of volunteers $2.6 $3.9 – – – – Intl Affairs Technical Assistance Foreign government training to combat terrorist financing – $3.0 – – – – Migration and Refugee Assistance Aid to potential new refugees in Pakistan and neighboring countries $50.0 $50.0 – – – – $861.5 $471.9 $50 by transfer $30 by transfer $0.0 $50.0 Bomb disposal & explosive equipment for Israel TOTAL Foreign Operations CRS-43 a. Reflects a reallocation on April 12, 2002, in order to provide $1.7 million for USAID to open a mission in Afghanistan. Previously, the President had allocated $2.4 million for USAID evacuations and communications. Sources: OMB and House and Senate Appropriations Committees. CRS-44 Interior and Related Agencies ($s – millions) Appropriation Account Executed Transfers (1st $10B) 15 Day/Wait Transfers (2nd $10B) Admin Request ($20B) House Passed Senate Passed Enacted – – $2.2 $2.2 $2.2 $2.2 $1.7 – – – – – Security at selected national monuments – – $6.1 $6.1 $6.1 $6.1 Reimburse NPS for employee relocation for security – – $4.0 $4.0 $4.0 $1.4 – – – – – Preparedness in NYC and DC – – $25.3 $25.3 $25.3 $25.3 Recovery of Federal Hall – – $16.5 $16.5 $16.5 $16.5 Security at Statue of Liberty and others – – $5.1 $5.1 $5.1 $5.1 Staff to review security planning and design changes for Federal buildings – – $0.8 $0.8 $0.8 $0.8 Security at Smithsonian facilities – – $21.7 $21.7 $21.7 $21.7 Purpose Department of the Interior Dept Offices, Working Capital Fund Security at DC headquarters National Park Service, Operation of the National Park System Emergency response in NYC and DC National Park Service, US Park Police Natl Park Serv-Construct/Maintenance National Capital Planning Commission, S&E Emergency response in NYC and DC a Smithsonian Institution Salaries and Expenses CRS-45 Executed Transfers (1st $10B) 15 Day/Wait Transfers (2nd $10B) Admin Request ($20B) House Passed Senate Passed Enacted Cleanup at NYC’s Heye Center museum – – $0.1 $0.1 $0.1 $0.1 National Gallery of Art Security at the Gallery – – $2.1 $2.1 $2.1 $2.1 Kennedy Center, O&M Security at the Kennedy Center – – $4.3 $4.3 $4.3 $4.3 $3.1 $0.0 $84.2 $88.2 $88.2 $88.2 Appropriation Account Purpose TOTAL Interior a. Requested within the GSA budget in the Department of the Treasury Chapter. Sources: OMB and House and Senate Appropriations Committees. CRS-46 Labor, Health and Human Services, and Education ($s – millions) Executed Transfers (1st $10B) 15 Day/Wait Transfers (2nd $10B) Admin Request ($20B) House Passed Senate Passed Enacted – – $10.0 $10.0 $10.0 $10.0 $126.2 – – – – – Supplies for Natl Pharmaceutical Stockpile to treat for anthrax and other infections – – $643.6 $593.6 $593.0 $593.0 Purchase of smallpox vaccine – – $509.0 $509.0 $512.0 $512.0 CDC upgrades for state and local capacity – – – $1,000.0 $865.0 State and local preparedness planning – – $0.0 $100.0 a Epi-X web-based disease notification and surveillance system; Health Alert Network; improve response surge capacity; and HHS Biological Detection and Assessment Teams – – $55.0 $90.0 a a State and local capacity building, including the augmentation of state lab capacity regarding critical biological agents; train state health depts. on bioterrorism – – $25.0 $233.0 a a – – – $165.0 $100.0 Appropriation Account Purpose U.S. Dept. of Education Office of Elementary and Secondary Ed - School Improvement Programs Crisis recovery services in New York and other jurisdictions (Project SERV) U.S. Dept. of Health and Human Services Public Health and Social Services Emergency Fund Health related needs-NYC/DC metro area Other CDC capacity upgrades, including research – – a CRS-47 Appropriation Account Executed Transfers (1st $10B) 15 Day/Wait Transfers (2nd $10B) – – $0.0 $0.0 $10.0 Expand CDC’s capacity to enhance state and local health lab protocols, and CDC capacity to process state lab samples – – $20.0 $20.0 – Train epidemic disaster response teams – – $20.0 $20.0 – Rapid toxic screening – – $10.0 $10.0 – CDC environmental hazard control activities – – – – – $7.5 – – $50.0 $170.0 $100.0 $135.0 – – $50.0 $50.0 – – – – $13.0 $28.0 – $55.8 Fully develop Natl Disaster Medical System readiness and operationalize all Disaster Medical Response Teams – – $20.0 $32.0 – HHS/CDC lab security – – $38.8 $30.0 $25.0 $71.0 Replenish NY and VA public health grants – – $20.0 $20.0 – – Evaluate masks/respirators used in NYC – – $15.0 $15.0 – – Expanded social services to NY and NJ – – $10.0 $10.0 – – Psychological trauma response and treating disorders of youth witnessing or experiencing a traumatic event – – $0.0 $10.0 – $10.0 Purpose National system to track biological pathogens Aid hospitals prepare and respond to mass immunization and treatment incidents Help large cities develop the Metropolitan Medical Response Systems Emergency HHS communications capabilities for coordination and other Admin Request ($20B) House Passed Senate Passed Enacted b b b b c CRS-48 Executed Transfers (1st $10B) 15 Day/Wait Transfers (2nd $10B) Admin Request ($20B) Natl Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases - bioterrorism research – – $0.0 NIH research on next-generation vaccines – – Natl Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases - construct biosafety labs – Reimburse organizations for healthcare related costs resulting from attacks Senate Passed Enacted $0.0 $99.0 $85.0 $0.0 $50.0 – – – $0.0 $0.0 $71.0 $70.0 – – $0.0 $0.0 $140.0 $140.0 Safety screening for emergency services personnel and rescue/recovery personnel – – $0.0 $12.0 $12.0 $12.0 Departmental Management, S&E Security and destroyed office recovery – – $5.9 $5.9 $5.9 $5.9 Training and Employment Services Temporary jobs to aid NYC restoration $25.0 – – – Appropriation Account Center for Disease Control, Disease Control Research and Training Purpose House Passed U.S. Dept. of Labor Natl Emergency Grants to States to aid dislocated workers $32.5d $32.5d – – $4.1 $4.1 $175.0 $175.0 $175.0 – – – – – $1.0 $1.0 $1.0 $1.0 – $1.6 $1.6 $1.6 $1.6 – – $3.5 – – Process New York unemployment insurance claims – – $4.1 $4.1 State Unemployment Security Office, Workers Compensation Programs Workers compensation for individuals in New York – – $0.0 Occupational Safety and Health Admin. OSHA monitoring at disaster sites $0.5 – Reconstitution of OSHA’s NYC office and continued on-site monitoring – Recovery from destruction of NY office – State Unemployment Insurance and Employment Service Operations Pension and Welfare Benefits Admin, S&E Unemployment insurance – $2,000.0 32.5 – d CRS-49 Appropriation Account Purpose Executed Transfers (1st $10B) 15 Day/Wait Transfers (2nd $10B) Admin Request ($20B) House Passed Senate Passed Enacted National Labor Relations Board, S&E Upgrade NLRB security – – $0.2 $0.2 $0.2 $0.2 Social Security Administration, Limitation on Administration Expenses Replace destroyed equipment and security at SSA facilities – – $7.5 $7.5 $7.5 $7.5 $155.2 $0.0 $2,964.8 $2,894.1 TOTAL Labor, Health and Human Services, and Education a. b. c. d. $3,529.7 $2,240.4 Funding included in the line for CDC upgrades for state and local capacity, above. Funding included in the line for other CDC capacity upgrades, including research, above. Funding included in the $55.8 million line, above. Earmarked for the Consortium of Worker Education, established by the New York City Central Labor Council and the New York City Partnership, for an Emergency Employment Clearing House. Sources: OMB and House and Senate Appropriations Committee. CRS-50 Legislative Branch ($s – millions) Appropriation Account Purpose Executed Transfers (1st $10B) 15 Day/Wait Transfers (2nd $10B) Admin Request ($20B) House Passed Senate Passed Enacted U.S. Capitol Police Increased security and overtime pay $80.8 – – – – – Senate Increased security; preparing for future $24.1 – – – – – House of Representatives Increased security; preparing for future $23.9 – – – – – Office of Attending Physician Reduce risk and potential damage of life caused by future terrorist events $1.5 – – – – – Architect of the Capitol Increased security; preparing for future; construction of Capitol Visitors Center $244.2 – – – – – Library of Congress Increased security; preparing for future $2.5 – – – – – Leg Branch Emergency Response Fund Security of the Capitol Hill complex, GPO, and GAO – – $256.1 a a a Senate security needs – – – $34.5 $34.5 $34.5 House security needs – – – $40.7 $40.7 $41.7 Capitol Police Board – – – $179.9 $180.9 $31.0 U.S. Capitol Historical Society – – – $1.0 $0.0 $1.0 Capitol Guide Service and Special Services – – – – – $0.4 Architect of the Capitol – – – – – $106.3 CRS-51 Appropriation Account Executed Transfers (1st $10B) 15 Day/Wait Transfers (2nd $10B) Admin Request ($20B) House Passed Senate Passed Enacted Library of Congress – – – – – $29.6 Government Printing Office – – – – – $4.0 General Accounting Office – – – – – $7.6 $377.0 $0.0 $256.1 $256.1 $256.1 $256.1 Purpose TOTAL Legislative Branch a. Included in funds listed below. Sources: OMB and House and Senate Appropriations Committee. CRS-52 Transportation and Related Agencies ($s – millions) Appropriation Account Purpose Executed Transfers (1st $10B) 15 Day/Wait Transfers (2nd $10B) Admin Request ($20B) House Passed Senate Passed Enacted Office of the Secretary, S&E Consulting support and analysis capacity – – $1.5 $0.5 $1.5 $0.0 Office of the Secretary, Payments to Air Carriers To maintain commercial air service to all eligible communities – – $0.0 $0.0 $57.0 $50.0 Office of the Secretary, Transportation Security Administration Start-up costs for new Transportation Security Administration – – $0.0 $15.0 $0.0 $94.8 Office of the Secretary, Aircraft Passenger and Baggage Screening Activities Passenger and baggage screening – – $0.0 $1,250.0 $0.0 $0.0 Offsetting Collections User fees from passengers and airlines – – $0.0 ($1,250) $0.0 $0.0 Coast Guard operating expenses NY Harbor patrols and reservists recall $18.0 – – – – – – – $116.0 $110.0 $285.4 $209.2 – – $85.0 $31.3 a a – – $2.0 $3.6 a a Coast Guard reservist pay and benefits Increase pace of operations for port and homeland security; port vulnerability assessments and other port security needs Coast Guard chemical/biological strike teams CRS-53 Executed Transfers (1st $10B) 15 Day/Wait Transfers (2nd $10B) Admin Request ($20B) House Passed Senate Passed Enacted $123.0 $36.0b $0.0 $233.0 – $65.0 Upgrades to aircraft cockpit security – – $300.0 $251.0 $100.0 Security demonstration projects – – $0.0 $28.5 $0.0 $15.0 Security “experts” hirings – – $0.0 $30.0 $0.0 $20.0 $15.0 $25.0 – – – – Security costs at air traffic control facilities $32.0d $10.0d – – – – FAA, Grants-In-Aid for Airports Compensate airports for costs of their heightened security posture – – – – $200.0 $175.0 FAA Aviation Insurance Revolving Fund War risk insurance for air carriers – – – – – FAA, Facilities and Equipment Accelerated purchase of security equipment for baggage and passenger screening – $87.5 $108.5 $175.0 $0.0 $108.5 – – $0.0 $0.0 $50.0 $50.0 $1,030.0 $325.0’e – – – – – – $10.0 $0.0 $10.0 Appropriation Account Federal Aviation Administration Ops Purpose Increased airport security/Sky Marshals Compensate DC airport authority and concessionaires for closure of Reagan National Airport FAA, Research, Engineering and Development Testing of emerging technologies that enhance aviation security Transportation Security Administration Civil aviation security activities Federal Highway Administration, Misc. Traffic control/detours in NYC and repair of non Federal-aid destroyed highways b c g CRS-54 Executed Transfers (1st $10B) 15 Day/Wait Transfers (2nd $10B) Admin Request ($20B) House Passed Senate Passed Enacted Expansion of interstate ferry service for New York and New Jersey – – $0.0 $0.0 $100.0 $100.0 Federal Highway Admin, Federal-Aid Highways, Emergency Relief Repair of Federal-aid destroyed highways – – $75.0 $75.0 $75.0 $75.0 Federal Railroad Admin, Safety and Ops Security of rail infrastructure/other needs – – $6.0 $6.0 $6.0 $6.0 Federal Railroad Admin, Capital Grants to Natl Railroad Passenger Corp Enhance security of Amtrak rail tunnels un the East and Hudson Rivers – – $0.0 $0.0 $100.0 $100.0 Federal Transit Admin, Formula Grants Replace destroyed buses and transit kiosks – – $4.8 $4.8 $4.8 $4.8 Security technical aid for transit agencies – – $5.2 $5.2 $5.2 $5.2 Detecting chemical/biological agents in transit stations – – $4.0 $4.0 $4.0 $4.0 Emergency response drills with transit agencies and local first response agencies – – $4.5 $4.5 $4.5 $4.5 Security training for transit operators – – $5.0 $5.0 $5.0 $5.0 Assistance to transit agencies most impacted by the terrorist attacks – – $0.0 $0.0 $100.0 $100.0 Increased security for DC metro public transportation system $10.0 – – – – – DOT Crisis Management Center – – $6.0 $2.5 $6.0 $2.5 Appropriation Account Federal Transit Admin, Capital Investment Grants Research and Special Programs Admin Purpose CRS-55 Appropriation Account Office of IG, S&E Natl Transportation Safety Board, S&E Purpose Assist OIG meeting new responsibilities, including border security audits Recovery of flight recorders and aid to victims’ families Staff costs for family assistance support, recovery of flight recorders and wreckage, and security upgrades TOTAL Transportation Executed Transfers (1st $10B) 15 Day/Wait Transfers (2nd $10B) Admin Request ($20B) House Passed Senate Passed Enacted – – $0.0 $0.0 $2.0 $1.3 $0.2 – – – – – – – $0.8 $0.5 $0.8 $0.7 $1,228.2 $483.5 $734.3 $734.4 $1,268.2 $1,296.5 a. Included in funding for Coast Guard reservists, above. b. Reflects a reallocation on April 12, 2002, of an earlier distribution in order to provide $325 million for the Transportation Security Administration. Previously, the President had allocated $311 million for increased airport security and Sky Marshals, and $50 million for Aviation Insurance Trust Fund. This was intended as a temporary reallocation, pending enactment of the FY2002 Supplemental appropriation. c. $50 million for cockpit door and transponder modifications in FAA Facilities and Equipment account below. d. On August 13, 2002, the President reallocated $42 million from the State Department, GSA, and the Secret Service in order to provide these additional funds for security at air traffic control facilities. e. Reflects two reallocation of funds for TSA that had been previously allocation to FEMA. A May 21, 2002 reallocation moved $760 million from FEMA to TSA, while a July 1, 2002 reallocation moved $270 million from FEMA to TSA. The Administration regarded these as “bridge loans” for TSA, and adjusted a pending FY2002 supplemental by reducing amounts requested for TSA and increasing amounts proposed for FEMA. f. Provided by the April 12, 2002 reallocation of funds previously allocated to the FAA (see footnote b). g. $10 million provided for this purpose under funding for FEMA in the VA/HUD chapter below. Sources: OMB and House and Senate Appropriations Committee. CRS-56 Treasury, Postal Service, Executive Office of the President, and General Govt ($s – millions) Executed Transfers (1st $10B) 15 Day/Wait Transfers (2nd $10B) Admin Request ($20B) House Passed Senate Passed Enacted Needs of staff located in/near WTC $6.1 – – – – – Air Transportation Stabilization Board $9.4 – $9.4 $0.0 $0.0 $0.0 Dept Offices, Financial Crimes Enforcement Foreign Terrorist Assets Tracking Center $0.1 – – – – – Dept Offices, IG for Tax Administration Replace NYC offices and equipment – – $2.0 $2.0 $2.0 $2.0 Dept Offices, Financial Crimes Enforcement Network, S&E Hire staff for Network and expand facility – – $1.7 $1.7 $1.7 $1.7 Federal Law Enforcement Training Center Training for law enforcement community – – $13.8 $23.2 $22.8 $23.0 Facility improvements at MD training center – – $0.0 $8.5 $0.0 $8.5 $0.1 – – – – – Conduct vulnerability assessments and security tests, and develop contingency plans – – $0.6 $0.0 $0.6 $0.0 Needs of staff located in/near WTC $1.5 – – – – – Appropriation Account Purpose Department of the Treasury Departmental Offices, S&E Financial Management Service Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, and Firearms S&E Foreign Terrorist Assets Tracking Center CRS-57 Appropriation Account Executed Transfers (1st $10B) 15 Day/Wait Transfers (2nd $10B) Admin Request ($20B) House Passed Senate Passed Enacted – – $31.4 $31.4 $31.4 $31.4 $21.0 – – – – – – – $107.5 $301.8 $292.6 $392.6 Natl Guard troops for security at U.S.- Canadian border $2.3 – – – – – Air support for counterterrorism $2.9 – – – – – Natl Guard troops for security at U.S.- Canadian border $11.8 – – – – – – – $6.7 $6.7 $6.7 $6.7 $1.9 – – – – – – – $16.7 $0.0 $16.7 $13.0 $2.2 – – – – – Purpose ATF agent expenses, replace destroyed equipment, and ATF canine program U.S. Customs Service, S&E Needs of staff located in/near WTC and air support for counterterrorism Airport, seaport, and land border security; replacement for destroyed equipment U.S. Customs Service, O&M/Procurement Increased air security IRS, Processing, Asst, and Management Securing NYC facilities, overtime and other admin costs Replacement for destroyed offices; security at other IRS facilities; taxpayer help IRS, Tax Law Enforcement Security/investigative expenses, replacement of destroyed equipment CRS-58 Appropriation Account IRS, Information Systems Purpose Executed Transfers (1st $10B) 15 Day/Wait Transfers (2nd $10B) Admin Request ($20B) House Passed Senate Passed Enacted Replacement of destroyed equipment and investigative work to combat terrorism – – $4.5 $4.5 $4.5 $4.5 $0.5 – – – – – – – $16.0 $0.0 $16.0 $16.0 $26.7a – $104.8 $104.8 $104.8 $104.8 – $100.0b – – – – – $75.0b – – – – – – $0.0 $0.0 $600.0 $500.0 Replacement of destroyed data infrastructure, install new network systems Replace destroyed equipment and secure taxpayer data base Secret Service, S&E Agent overtime and new hiring; replacement of destroyed equipment; training for investigations and preparedness US Postal Service US Postal Service Fund Irradiation equipment to sanitize mail Personnel protection equipment, testing kits, site clean-up and medicine, and public education material Establish a system for sanitizing and screening mail, protect postal workers, and repair NYC facilities CRS-59 Appropriation Account Executed Transfers (1st $10B) 15 Day/Wait Transfers (2nd $10B) Admin Request ($20B) House Passed Senate Passed Enacted Relocate staff; protective window film $7.2 – – – – – Establish office of Homeland Security $25.5 – – – – – – – $50.0 $0.0 $50.0 $50.0 Purpose Executive Office of President Office of Administration, S&E Additional requirements and support/ services to President and Vice President National Security Council (NSC) S&E Establish NSC Directorate to Combat Terrorism $4.8 – – – – – Unanticipated needs Other urgent security-related activities $51.0 – – – – – Equipment replacement for NY HIDTA $2.3 – – – – – Increased security coverage and other costs $8.6 – – – – – Security nationwide at Federal buildings – – $200.5 $87.4c $126.5 $126.5 $5.2d – – – – – Federal Drug Control Programs High Intensity Drug Trafficking Areas General Services Administration Real Property Activities; Fed. Buildings Fund Security upgrades at the Eisenhower Executive Office Building CRS-60 Appropriation Account Purpose Executed Transfers (1st $10B) 15 Day/Wait Transfers (2nd $10B) Admin Request ($20B) House Passed Senate Passed Enacted National Archives and Record Administration Operating Expenses Security at NARA facilities – – $4.8 $0.0 $4.8 $1.6 Repairs and Reconstruction Building security upgrades at NARA sites – – $2.2 $0.0 $2.2 $1.0 $191.1 $175.0 $572.6 $572.0 $1,283.3 $1,283.3 TOTAL Treasury, Postal Service, Executive Office of the President, and General Govt a. On August 13, 2002, the President reallocated $10 million from the Secret Service in order to provide funds for FAA security costs at air traffic control facilities. Previously, the President had allocated $36.7 million for Secret Service overtime pay and new hiring costs. b. On May 15, 2002, the President requested the elimination of the distinct funding categories of the $175 million for the U.S. Postal Service in order to provide greater flexibility. c. Limited to needs in New York City. d. On August 13, 2002, the President reallocated $20 million from GSA in order to provide funds for FAA security costs at air traffic control facilities. Previously, the President had allocated $27.2 million for GSA security upgrades at the Eisenhower Executive Office Building. Sources: OMB and House and Senate Appropriations Committee. CRS-61 Veterans Affairs, Housing and Urban Development, and Independent Agencies ($s – millions) Executed Transfers (1st $10B) 15 Day/Wait Transfers (2nd $10B) Admin Request ($20B) House Passed Senate Passed Enacted $620.0a – $2,150.0 $4,345.0 $5,824.0 $4,356.9 Building reconstruction – – $1,000.0 b b b Transit/subway repair – – $1,750.0 b b b Response and rescue $300.0 – – – – – Disaster aid to individuals $50.0 – – – – – Appropriation Account Purpose Federal Emergency Management Agency Disaster Relief Debris removal Emergency Management Planning and Asst Grants to states and localities for first responder training and equipment – – $580.0 $35.0 $290.0 $220.0 Salaries and Expenses Administration of grants by the Office of National Preparedness – – $20.0 $30.0 $20.0 $25.0 Dept of Veterans Affairs Natl Cemetery Administration Internment costs of veterans killed in terrorist attacks $0.2 – – – – – General Operations Expenses Security evaluation at all VA facilities – – $0.0 $2.0 $0.0 $2.0 Construction, Major Projects Security evaluation of VA facilities – – $2.0 $0.0 $2.0 Replacing HUD/IG offices in WTC – – $1.0 $1.0 $1.0 C Dept of Housing and Urban Development Management and Administration - IG $1.0 CRS-62 Appropriation Account Community Planning and Development, Community Development Block Grants Executed Transfers (1st $10B) 15 Day/Wait Transfers (2nd $10B) Admin Request ($20B) House Passed Senate Passed Enacted Assist NYC economic recovery with grants affected businesses – $700.0 $0.0 $1,825.0 $2,000.0 $2,000.0 Security at EPA labs – – $6.0 $10.0 $6.0 $90.3 Drinking water vulnerability assessments – – $34.0 Reimburse EPA for anthrax decontamination activities and projected needs – – $0.0 $0.0 $1.5 Relocation of NY office and replacement of destroyed equipment – – $0.7 $0.7 $0.7 Support for drinking water assessments – – $0.5 $109.7 $0.5 Security at EPA non-lab sites – – $24.0 $30.0 $24.0 Reimburse EPA for anthrax decontamination activities and projected needs – – $0.0 $0.0 $7.0 EPA responsibilities in criminal investigations related to bioterrorism – – $0.0 $0.0 $6.0 State grants to work with EPA on threats to drinking water supply systems – – $5.0 $5.0 $5.0 $5.0 Establish a West Coast response team – – $5.5 $5.5 $5.5 $41.3 Relocation of NY office and replacement of destroyed equipment – – $0.3 $0.3 $0.3 Purpose Environmental Protection Agency Science and Technology Environmental Programs and Management State and Tribal Assistance Grants Hazardous Substance Superfund d $34.0 e e $39.0 f f f f g CRS-63 Executed Transfers (1st $10B) 15 Day/Wait Transfers (2nd $10B) Admin Request ($20B) House Passed Senate Passed Reimburse EPA for anthrax decontamination activities and projected needs – – $0.0 $0.0 $12.5 EPA responsibilities responding to terrorism – – – – $23.0 Train workers to do Superfund cleanup – – $0.0 $10.5 $10.5 $10.5 Human Space Flight Security at field centers and headquarters – – $64.5 $81.0 $64.5 $76.0 Science, Aeronautics and Technology Security at field centers and headquarters – – $28.6 $36.5 $28.6 $32.5 Inspector General Security and counterintelligence – – $0.0 $3.0 $0.0 $0.0 Security at NSF R&D facilities – – $0.3 $0.3 $0.3 $0.3 $970.2 $700.0 $5,672.4 $6,530.5 $8,366.9 $6,899.8 Appropriation Account NIH, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences Purpose Enacted g g NASA National Science Foundation Research and Related Activities TOTAL VA, HUD, and Independent Agencies a. Includes two reallocation of funds moving money from FEMA to the Transportation Security Administration (TSA). On May 21, 2002, the Administration reallocated $760 million from FEMA to TSA; on July 1, 2002, the Administration reallocated $270 million from FEMA to TSA. Originally, the President had allocated $1.65 billion for FEMA. These reallocations were transfer were intended as a temporary actions to provide “bridge loans” for TSA. Both notices also included an amendment to the pending FY2002 Supplemental appropriation that would increase the proposal for FEMA and reduce the request for TSA by the amounts of the reallocations. b. Included in Debris Removal line, above. c. Funded in line directly above. d. Funded within Environmental Programs and Management, below. e. Funded within Security at EPA labs, above. f. Funded within $39 million line, above. g. Funded within $41.3 million line, above. Sources: OMB, House and Senate Appropriations Committee, and FEMA. 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