State Department and Related Agencies FY2000 Appropriations

State Department and Related Agencies FY2000 Appropriations Crystal D. Maitland Quality Assurance Editor August 30, 2019 Congressional Research Service 7-.... www.crs.gov RL30197 State Department and Related Agencies FY2000 Appropriations State Department and Related Agencies FY2000 Appropriations RL30197 August 30, 2019 Crystal D. Maitland On February 1, 1999 the President submitted his FY2000 budget request which, after being Quality Assurance Editor -redacted-@crs.loc.gov amended in June, included $6.3 billion for the Department of State and the Broadcasting Board of Governors. This represents a decline of $683 million (or 9.8%) from the FY1999 enacted level For a copy of the full report, which consists of regular appropriations and an emergency supplemental appropriation for please call 7-.... or visit embassy security, among other measures. Congress approved the conference report (H.Rept.106www.crs.gov. 398) on October 20, 1999. The President vetoed the CJS legislation on October 25th, citing the need for hate crime legislation, the inadequacy in funding of the Department of Justice COPS program to hire additional police officers, and inadequate funding/authorization for U.S. arrearage payment to the United Nations. In November, Congress merged a number of bills, including the CJS appropriations (H.R. 3421) into a consolidated bill (H.R. 3194). Congress passed the Act on November 19, 1999; the President signed it into law (P.L. 106-113) on November 29, 1999. The Foreign Affairs Reform and Restructuring Act of 1999 (P.L. 105-277, section 1001) required the foreign policy agencies to be reorganized before FY2000. The Act required that the Arms Control and Disarmament Agency (ACDA) merge its functions into the Department of State, and the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) reorganize and come directly under the authority of the Secretary of State by April 1, 1999. It required the U.S. Information Agency (USIA) to consolidate its information and exchange functions into the Department of State, while the broadcasting functions became an independent agency--the Broadcasting Board of Governors (BBG)--as of October 1, 1999. The amended FY2000 State Department budget request contained a total of$568 million for embassy security upgrades and an advance appropriation request of$3.6 billion for FY2001 - 2005. The final appropriations includes $568 million specifically for worldwide security upgrades, with funds in other accounts available for overseas security, as well. U.S. arrearage payments to the United Nations had been a controversial issue in recent years. The 105th Congress appropriated $475 million for arrearage payments for FY1999; it was never authorized, however, because Congress included in the authorization bill international family planning language that triggered a presidential veto. The Administration sought $446 million for U.S. arrearage payments to the U.N. for FY2000; Congress agreed to $351 million. For the Broadcasting Board of Governors, the Administration requested an FY2000 budget of $452.6 million–a 13.8% increase over the FY1999 broadcasting account to help establish it as an independent agency. Congress agreed to $421.8 million for the BBG in FY2000. This is the final report on the State Department’s FY2000 budget. Congressional Research Service State Department and Related Agencies FY2000 Appropriations Congressional Research Service State Department and Related Agencies FY2000 Appropriations Congressional Research Service 1 State Department and Related Agencies FY2000 Appropriations Congressional Research Service 2 State Department and Related Agencies FY2000 Appropriations Congressional Research Service 3 State Department and Related Agencies FY2000 Appropriations Congressional Research Service 4 State Department and Related Agencies FY2000 Appropriations Congressional Research Service 5 State Department and Related Agencies FY2000 Appropriations Congressional Research Service 6 State Department and Related Agencies FY2000 Appropriations Congressional Research Service 7 State Department and Related Agencies FY2000 Appropriations Congressional Research Service 8 State Department and Related Agencies FY2000 Appropriations Congressional Research Service 9 State Department and Related Agencies FY2000 Appropriations Author Contact Information Crystal D. 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