Native American Heritage Month: Fact Sheet




Native American Heritage Month: Fact Sheet
Updated November 18, 2021
Congressional Research Service
https://crsreports.congress.gov
R44258




Native American Heritage Month: Fact Sheet

Introduction
Native American Heritage Month (also known as National American Indian Heritage Month)
celebrates the contributions and achievements of Native Americans.
November was first designated as National American Indian Heritage Month on August 3, 1990,
by P.L. 101-343, To authorize and request the President to proclaim the month of November
1990, and thereafter as “Native American Indian Heritage Month.” Since then, Presidents have
issued annual proclamations promoting this observance.
On June 26, 2009, P.L. 111-33, Native American Heritage Day Act of 2009, designated the Friday
after Thanksgiving as Native American Heritage Day.
This guide assists congressional offices with work related to Native American Heritage Month
celebrations. It provides links to sample congressional speeches and recognitions, presidential
proclamations, statistical data, cultural resources, and selected federal agencies and programs that
focus on Native American issues. This guide also includes links to selected educational and
advocacy organizations.
Sample Congressional Speeches and Recognitions
Members of Congress often make floor statements, issue press releases, and enter Extensions of
Remarks into the Congressional Record to recognize federal holidays. The following are some
recent examples that may be of assistance in preparing such statements:
 Representative Carolyn B. Maloney, “Statement on Native American Heritage
Month,” press release on Representative Maloney’s website (November 2, 2020)
 Representative Markwayne Mullin, “Celebrating Our Heritage,” column on
Representative Mullin’s website (November 20, 2019)
 Representative Deb Haaland, “Native American Heritage Month,” remarks in the
House, Congressional Record (September 19, 2019)
 Representative Don Bacon, “Native American Heritage Month: Honoring the
Life of Judi Gaiashkibos,” remarks in the House, Congressional Record
(September 27, 2018)
 Representative Tom O’Hal eran, “National Native American Heritage Month,”
remarks in the House, Congressional Record (November 30, 2017)
 Representative Betty McCollum, “National Native American Heritage Month,”
Extension of Remarks, Congressional Record (November 19, 2015)
 Senator John Thune “Celebrating Native American Heritage Month,” Op-Ed on
Senator Thune’s website (November 14, 2014)
 Representative Tammy Duckworth, “Honoring Native Heritage Month and
Sacrifices Made by Native American Veterans,” Extension of Remarks,
Congressional Record (November 12, 2014)
 Representative Tom Cole, “Celebrating Native American Heritage,” column on
Representative Cole’s website (November 3, 2014)
 Senator Tim Johnson, “Native American Heritage Month,” remarks in the Senate,
Congressional Record (November 21, 2013)
 Senator Patrick Leahy, “Native American Heritage Month,” remarks in the
Senate, Congressional Record (November 13, 2013)
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Native American Heritage Month: Fact Sheet

Presidential Proclamations
One of the uses of a presidential proclamation is to honor a group or cal attention to certain
issues or events. Proclamations commemorating Native American Heritage Month include the
following:

 Presidential Proclamation—Joseph R. Biden, Jr. (2021)
 Presidential Proclamations—Donald J. Trump (2017-2020)
 Presidential Proclamations—Barack H. Obama (2009–2016)
 Presidential Proclamations—George W. Bush (2001–2008)
Earlier presidential proclamations are available through the Government Publishing Office
website at govinfo.gov.
Statistics
Federal statistics on the American Indian population are available at
 Facts for Features: American Indian and Alaska Native Heritage Month:
November 2021, Census Bureau
Statistics on population, reservations, tribes, families, housing, languages,
education, veterans, income, and health insurance
 2010 Census Brief, American Indian and Alaska Native Population, Census
Bureau
 American Indian and Alaska Native Data Links, Census Bureau
Includes population snap shot and detailed reports
 Health of American Indian or Alaska Native Population, Center for Disease
Control and Prevention
Native American Heritage Month Cultural Resources
Numerous government resources provide information on the history and culture of the holiday.
Some of these include the following:
 Native American Heritage Month, collaborative site of multiple federal agencies
 A History of National Native American Heritage Month, Bureau of Indian
Affairs
 Native American Heritage Month, National Park Service
 National Register of Historic Places: National American Indian Heritage Month,
National Park Service
 National Museum of the American Indian, Smithsonian Institution
Selected Federal Agencies and Programs
 Federal y Recognized Indian Tribes and Resources for Native Americans,
USA.gov
Includes sections on cultural, housing, and legal resources
 Bureau of Indian Affairs, Department of the Interior
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Native American Heritage Month: Fact Sheet

 Administration for Native Americans, an Office of the Administration for
Children and Families, Department of Health and Human Services
 Indian Health Service, Department of Health and Human Services
 Office of Indian Education, U.S. Department of Education
Educational, Cultural, and Advocacy Organizations
Numerous nongovernmental organizations provide information on and promote advocacy for
Native Americans. Some of these include the following:
 Association on American Indian Affairs
 First Nations Development Institute
 National Congress of American Indians
 National Urban Indian Family Coalition

Author Information

Audrey Celeste Crane-Hirsch

Reference Librarian



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Congressional Research Service
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