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Financial Services and General Government (FSGG) FY2018 Appropriations: Overview

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Financial Services and General Government (FSGG) FY2018 Appropriations: Overview

September 1, 2017March 7, 2018 (R44933)
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Summary

The Financial Services and General Government (FSGG) appropriations bill includes funding for the Department of the Treasury, the Executive Office of the President (EOP), the judiciary, the District of Columbia, and more than two dozen independent agencies. The House and Senate FSGG bills fund the same agencies, with one exception. The Commodity Futures Trading Commission (CFTC) is funded through the Agriculture appropriations bill in the House and the FSGG bill in the Senate. This structure has existed since the 2007 reorganization of the House and Senate Committees on Appropriations.

President Trump submitted his FY2018 budget request on May 23, 2017. The request included a total of $45.2 billion for agencies funded through the FSGG appropriations bill, including $250 million for the CFTC.

The House Committee on Appropriations reported a Financial Services and General Government Appropriations Act, 2018 (H.R. 3280, H.Rept. 115-234) on July 17, 2017. Total FY2018 funding in the reported bill would be $42.5 billion, with another $248 million for the CFTC included in the Agriculture appropriations bill (H.R. 3268, H.Rept. 115-232). The combined total of $42.7 billion would be about $2.5 billion below the President's FY2018 request, with most of thisthe largest difference in the funding for the General Services Administration (GSA).

The House Committee on Rules announced a September 5, 2017, meeting to consider a rule on H.R. 3354, which was reported from the Appropriations Committee as the Interior appropriations bill. Under the Rules Committee announcement, H.R. 3354 would be considered on the House floor including nearly all of the text of H.R. 3280 as Division D of H.R. 3354.

The Senate Committee on Appropriations has held FSGG subcommittee hearings, but has yet to release an FSGG bill for FY2018text of nearly all of H.R. 3280 was included as Division D of H.R. 3354, an omnibus appropriations bill, when it was considered by the House of Representatives beginning on September 6. 2017. The bill was amended numerous times shifting funding among FSGG agencies but not changing the FSGG totals. H.R. 3354 passed on September 14, 2017.

The full Senate Committee on Appropriations has not acted on an FY2018 FSGG appropriations bill. A draft FY2018 chairmen's recommended FSGG bill along with an explanatory statement was released on November 20, 2017. Funding in the draft bill would total $43.3 billion, about $1.9 billion below the President's FY2018 request with most of this difference in funding for the GSA.

With the end of FY2017 approaching and no FY2018 appropriations bills enacted, a continuing resolution (CR) was enacted on September 8, 2017 to provide funding for most of the government until December 8, 2017 (P.L. 115-56). The CR provided funding for most FSGG agencies at the FY2017 funding rate subject to an across-the-board decrease of 0.6791% (pursuant to Section 101(b) of Division D). Additional CRs have provided funding through December 22, 2017 (P.L. 115-90), January 19, 2018 (P.L. 115-96), February 8, 2018 (P.L. 115-120), and March 23, 2018 (P.L. 115-123). These CRs generally maintained FSGG funding based on FY2017 levels with P.L. 115-123 also adding supplemental funding for the GSA and the Small Business Administration.

Although financial services are a major focus of the FSGG appropriations bills, these bills do not include funding for many financial regulatory agencies, which are funded outside of the appropriations process. The FSGG bills do, however, often contain additional legislative provisions relating to such agencies as is the case with H.R. 3280 and H.R. 3354, which contain, which contains several provisions in Title IX and Title X that also appear in H.R. 10, a broad financial regulatory bill passed by the House on June 8, 2017.

The Senate draft bill includes fewer legislative provisions, notably one to bring the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau's funding under the appropriations process.


Financial Services and General Government (FSGG) FY2018 Appropriations: Overview

The Financial Services and General Government (FSGG) appropriations bill includes funding for the Department of the Treasury (Title I), the Executive Office of the President (EOP; Title II), the judiciary (Title III), the District of Columbia (Title IV), and more than two dozen independent agencies (Title V). The bill typically funds mandatory retirement accounts in Title VI, which also contains additional general provisions applying to the funding provided agencies through the FSGG bill. Title VII contains general provisions applying government-wide. The FSGG bills have often also contained provisions relating to U.S. policy toward Cuba.1

The House and Senate FSGG bills fund the same agencies, with one exception. The Commodity Futures Trading Commission (CFTC) is funded through the Agriculture appropriations bill in the House and the FSGG bill in the Senate. This structure has existed in its current form since the 2007 reorganization of the House and Senate Committees on Appropriations. Although financial services are a major focus of the bills, FSGG appropriations bills do not include many financial regulatory agencies, which are instead funded outside of the appropriations process.

Administration and Congressional Action

President Trump submitted his FY2018 budget request on May 23, 2017. The request included a total of $45.2 billion for agencies funded through the FSGG appropriations bill, including $250 million for the CFTC.2

On July 17, 2017, the House Committee on Appropriations reported a Financial Services and General Government Appropriations Act, 2018 (H.R. 3280, H.Rept. 115-234).3 Total FY2018 funding in the reported bill would be $42.5 billion, with another $248 million for the CFTC included in the Agriculture appropriations bill (H.R. 3268, H.Rept. 115-232).4 The combined total of $42.7 billion would be about $2.5 billion below the President's FY2018 request, with most of this difference in the funding for the General Services Administration (GSA).

The House Committee on Rules announced a September 5, 2017, meeting to consider a rule for H.R. 3354, which was reported from the House Appropriations Committee as the Interior appropriations bill. Under the Rules Committee announcement, H.R. 3354 would be considered on the House floor including nearly all of the text of H.R. 3280 as Division D of H.R. 3354.

The Senate Committee on Appropriations has held FSGG subcommittee hearings, but has yet to release an FSGG bill for FY2018text of nearly all of H.R. 3280 was included as Division D of H.R. 3354 when it was considered by the House of Representatives beginning on September 6. 2017. The bill was amended numerous times, shifting funding among FSGG agencies but not changing the FSGG totals.5 H.R. 3354 passed on September 14, 2017.

The Senate Committee on Appropriations released an FY2018 chairmen's recommended FSGG draft bill along with an explanatory statement on November 20, 2017.6 Funding in the recommended bill would total $43.3 billion, about $1.9 billion below the President's FY2018 request with most of this difference in funding for the GSA.

Continuing Resolution7

With the end of FY2017 approaching and no permanent FY2018 appropriations bills enacted, Congress passed, and the President signed, H.R. 601/P.L. 115-56. Division D of this act provided for continuing appropriations through December 8, 2017, generally termed a continuing resolution (CR). The CR provides funding for most FSGG agencies at the FY2017 funding rate subject to an across-the-board reduction of 0.6791% (pursuant to Section 101(b) of Division D). It also included separate divisions establishing a program to provide foreign assistance concerning basic education (Division A—Reinforcing Education Accountability in Development Act), providing supplemental appropriations for disaster relief requirements for FY2017 (Division B), and temporarily suspending the public debt limit (Division C). In addition to the funding for FSGG agencies as described, the CR contains a number of deviations or "anomalies" from the general formula. The FSGG anomalies focused on funding related to the presidential transition, which had been increased in FY2017.

Additional CRs have provided funding through December 22, 2017 (P.L. 115-90), January 19, 2018 (P.L. 115-96), February 8, 2018 (P.L. 115-120), and March 23, 2018 (P.L. 115-123). P.L. 115-123 also included an additional $127 million for the GSA and $1.66 billion for the Small Business Administration (SBA), largely to address disaster costs from hurricanes in 2017.

Table 1 reflects the status of FSGG appropriations measures at key points in the appropriations process. Table 2 lists the broad amounts requested by the President and included in the various FSGG bills, largely by title, and Table 3 details the amounts for the independent agencies. Specific columns in Table 2 and Table 3 are FSGG agencies' enacted amounts for FY2017, the President's FY2018 request, and the FY2018 amounts as reported by the House Appropriations Committee and as included in the Senate Appropriations Chairmen's draft bill.

Table 1. Status of FY2018 Financial Services and General Government Appropriations

Subcommittee Markup

House Report

House
Passage

Senate ReportDraft

Senate Passage

Conference Report

Final Adoption

Public Law

House

Senate

 

 

 

 

 

House

Senate

 

6/29/2017

 

7/17/2017

9/14/2017

11/20/17

Source: Prepared by the Congressional Research Service (CRS).

Table 2. Financial Services and General Government Appropriations,
FY2017-FY2018

(in millions of dollars)

Agency

FY2017 Enacted

FY2018 Request

FY2018 House Committee

-Passed

FY2018 Senate Committee

Chairmen's Draft

FY2018 Enacted

Department of the Treasury

$11,595

$11,223

$11,551

540
 

 

$11,834
 

Executive Office of the President

709

689

692

720
 

 

718
 

The Judiciary

7,359

7,670

7,535

530
 

 

7,630
 

District of Columbia

756

704

696

 

 

704
 

Independent Agencies

1,528

3,110

108

503

488
 

 

593
 

Mandatory Retirement Accounts

21,376

21,800

21,800

 

 

21,800
 

Total

43,325

45,193

42,723

 

 

43,279
 

Sources: H.R. 3280, H.Rept. 115-234, H.R. 3268, and H.Rept. 115-232H.Rept. 115-232, H.R. 3354, and draft Senate Chairmen's bill (https://www.appropriations.senate.gov/download/fy2018-fsgg-chairmens-mark) and Explanatory Statement (https://www.appropriations.senate.gov/download/fy2018-fsgg-explanatory-statement).

Notes: Totals for each column include funding for the Commodity Futures Trading Commission (CFTC). The CFTC is funded in the House through the Agriculture appropriations bill and in the Senate through the FSGG bill. Figures are net reflecting rescissions and offsetting collections. The mandatory spending for the President's salary is contained in Title VI, Section 619 whereas the rest of presidential spending is in Title II. The Mandatory Retirement Accounts amount stems from Title VI (§619). Title VI also includes a $2.6 million reduction in Small Business Administration unobligated balances in Section 620., Section 619. Title VI, Section 620 of the Senate bill, but not the House bill includes $1 million for Public Company and Accounting Oversight Board scholarships, which is reflected under "Independent Agencies." H.R. 3354, Title IX's legislative provisions result in a $50 million savings which is included in the House-passed total. Totals may not sum due to rounding.

Table 3. FSGG Independent Agencies Appropriations, FY2017-FY2018

(in millions of dollars)

Agency

FY2017 Enacted

FY2018 Request

FY2018 House-Passed Committee

FY2018 Senate Committee

Chairmen's Draft

FY2018 Enacted

Administrative Conference of the United States

$3

$3

$3

 

$3

$3

$3

$3

 

Commodity Futures Trading Commissiona

250

250

248

 

250

250

248

250

 

Consumer Product Safety Commission

126

123

123

 

126

123

123

123

 

Election Assistance Commission

10

9

7

 

10

9

7

9

 

Federal Communications Commissionb

(357)

(322)

(322)

 

(357)

(322)

(322)

(322)

 

Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation: Office of Inspector Generalc

(36)

(39)

(39)

 

(36)

(39)

(39)

(39)

 

Federal Election Commission

79

71

71

 

79

71

71

71

 

Federal Labor Relations Authority

26

26

26

 

26

26

26

26

 

Federal Trade Commission

173

164

164

 

173

164

164

164

 

General Services Administrationd

-1,095

509

-2,044

 

-1,095

509

-2,068

-2,108

 

Harry S Truman Scholarship Foundation

1

1

 

1

1

1

 

Merit Systems Protection Board

47

47

47

 

47

47

47

47

 

Morris K. Udall Foundation

5

5

 

5

5

5

 

National Archives and Records Administratione

376

351

355

 

376

351

355

378

 

National Credit Union Administration

2

2

 

2

2

2

 

Office of Government Ethics

16

16

16

 

16

16

16

16

 

Office of Personnel Management (discretionary)

289

310

291

 

289

310

291

291

 

Office of Special Counsel

25

27

25

 

25

27

25

27

 

Postal Regulatory Commission

16

14

15

 

16

14

15

15

 

Privacy and Civil Liberties Oversight Board

10

8

8

 

10

8

8

8

 

Public Building Reform Board

2

0035

 

 

Securities and Exchange Commissionb

(1,605)

(1,847)

(1,897)

 

2

3

 

Public Company Accounting Oversight Board Scholarships

1

1
 

Securities and Exchange Commissionb

(1,605)

(1,847)

(1,897)

(1,847)

 

- SEC Reserve Fund Rescission

-25

-25

-75

 

-25

-25

-75

 

Selective Service System

23

23

23

 

23

23

23

23

 

Small Business Administration

887

829

848

 

887

829

860

886

 

- SBA Prior Year Rescission

-55

 

 

 

-55

-3

-3

-3

 

United States Postal Service (USPS)

35

58

58

 

35

58

58

58

 

USPS Office of Inspector General

254

235

235

 

254

235

235

245

 

United States Tax Court

51

53

51

 

51

53

51

53

 

Total: Independent Agencies (net discretionary)

1,528

3,110

503

 

1,528

3,108

488

593

 

Sources: H.R. 3280, H.Rept. 115-234, H.R. 3268, and H.Rept. 115-232H.Rept. 115-232, H.R. 3354, and draft Senate Committee bill (https://www.appropriations.senate.gov/download/fy2018-fsgg-chairmens-mark) and Explanatory Statement (https://www.appropriations.senate.gov/download/fy2018-fsgg-explanatory-statement).

Notes: All figures are rounded. Columns may not sum due to rounding. Figures in parenthesis reflect offsetting collections and are not totaled.

a. The CFTC is funded in the House through the Agriculture appropriations bill and in the Senate through the FSGG bill.

b. The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) and the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) are funded by collecting regulatory fees, resulting in no direct appropriations. Therefore, the amounts shown for the FCC and SEC represent budgetary resources, but those amounts are not included in the table totals. The SEC reserve fund reduction is contained in the general provisions in Title VI rather than with the agency funding in Title V and is reflected in the totals.

c. Budget authority transferred to the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation's (FDIC's) Office of Inspector General (OIG) is not included in total FSGG appropriations; it is counted as part of the budget authority in the appropriation account from which it came.

d. The General Services Administration's (GSA's) real property activities are funded through the Federal Buildings Fund (FBF), a multibillion-dollar revolving fund into which federal agencies deposit rental payments for leased GSA space. Congress makes the FBF revenue available each year to pay for GSA's real property activities. A negative total for the FBF occurs when the amount of funds made available for expenditure in a fiscal year is less than the amount of new revenue expected to be deposited.

e. Amount as shown in the committee reports; figures do not include appropriations for repayments of principal on the construction of the Archives II facility. The amount reported in the President's budget request and the specific appropriations bills includes this principal repayment.

Financial Regulatory Agencies and FSGG Appropriations

Although financial services are a focus of the FSGG bill, the bill does not actually include funding for the regulation of much of the financial services industry. Financial services as an industry is often subdivided into banking, insurance, and securities.58 Federal regulation of the banking industry is divided among the Federal Reserve, the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC), the Office of Comptroller of the Currency (OCC), and the Bureau of Consumer Financial Protection (generally known as the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, or CFPB). In addition, credit unions, which operate similarly to many banks, are regulated by the National Credit Union Administration (NCUA). None of these agencies receives its primary funding through the appropriations process, with only the FDIC inspector general and a small program operated by the NCUA currently funded in the FSGG bill.

Insurance generally is regulated at the state level, with some oversight at the holding company level by the Federal Reserve. There is a relatively small Federal Insurance Office (FIO) inside the Treasury, which is funded through the Departmental Offices account, but FIO has no regulatory authority.6

9

Federal securities regulation is divided between the SEC and the CFTC, both of which are funded through appropriations. The CFTC funding is a relatively straightforward appropriation from the general fund, whereas the SEC funding is provided by the FSGG bill, but then offset through fees collected by the SEC.

Although funding for many financial regulatory agencies may not be provided by the FSGG bill, legislative provisions affecting financial regulation in general and some of these agencies specifically have often been included in FSGG bills. H.R. 3280 includesand H.R. 3354 as passed by the House include many provisions, particularly in Title IX and Title X, that would amend the 2010 Dodd-Frank Act710 and other statutes relating to the regulation of financial institutions and the authority and funding of financial regulators. Many of these provisions were included in other legislation, notably H.R. 10,811 which was passed by the House on June 8, 2017. Of particular interest from the appropriations perspective, H.R. 3280 and H.R. 3354 as passed by the House would bring several financial regulators under the FSGG bill instead of receiving funding from outside of the appropriations process as is currently the case.9 Previous FSGG bills that addressed the Dodd-Frank Act and other financial regulatory changes proved controversial.

12 Table 4 below lists the provisions in common between H.R. 10 and H.R. 3354 as passed. Previous FSGG bills that addressed the Dodd-Frank Act and other financial regulatory changes proved controversial. Table 4. Provisions of the Financial CHOICE Act in H.R. 3354

Topic

H.R. 3354, Division D

H.R. 10

Repeals rules whose authority is eliminated by bill

Section 902

Section 2

Repeals various Financial Stability Act provisions

Section 903

Section 151

Brings financial regulators under appropriations (except NCUA due to H.Amdt. 443).

Sections 904-907; Section 926

Title III, Subtitle E; Section 712

Disclosures

Section 908

Section 426

Section 31 fees

Section 909

Section 416

Investment fund research

Section 910

Section 421

Government-business forum on capital formation

Section 911

Section 446

Angel investors

Section 912

Sections 451-452

Venture capital funds

Section 913

Section 471

Manufactured housing

Section 914

Sections 501-502

Deposit account termination

Section 915

Section 511

FIRREA amendments

Section 916

Section 512

Loans held in portfolio

Section 917

Section 516

Small bank holding company policy

Section 918

Section 526

Community Institution Mortgage Relief

Section 919

Section 531

Regulations appropriate to business models

Section 920

Section 546

Jobs for loan originators

Section 921

Section 556

Small business loan data

Section 922

Section 561

Depository institution records and disclosure

Section 923

Section 576

Interest rate after loan transfer

Section 924

Section 581

CFBP authority and budget changes

Sections 925-929

Sections 712, 727, 733, 735, 737

Nonresidential risk retention

Section 930

Section 842

Prohibition in single ballot

Section 931

Section 845

Volcker Rule repeal

Section 932

Section 901

Financial institution bankruptcy

Title X

Sections 121-123

Source: CRS Insight IN10769, Financial Regulation: FY2018 Appropriations and the Financial CHOICE Act (H.R. 10), by [author name scrubbed] and [author name scrubbed].

Notes: Other provisions related to financial regulation include Section 114 of Division A, which would repeal the Department of Labor's 2016 Fiduciary Rule, and H.Amdt. 441, which would prohibit the use of appropriated funds toward enforcing the SEC's conflict minerals rule.

Committee Structure and Scope

The House and Senate Committees on Appropriations reorganized their subcommittee structures in early 2007. Each chamber created a new Financial Services and General Government Subcommittee. In the House, the jurisdiction of the FSGG Subcommittee is composed primarily of agencies that had been under the jurisdiction ofof the Subcommittee on Transportation, Treasury, Housing and Urban Development, the Judiciary, the District of Columbia, and Independent Agencies, commonly referred to as "TTHUD."1013 In addition, the House FSGG Subcommittee was assigned four independent agencies that had been under the jurisdiction of the Science, State, Justice, Commerce, and Related Agencies Subcommittee: the Federal Communications Commission (FCC), the Federal Trade Commission (FTC), the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC), and the Small Business Administration (SBA).

In the Senate, the jurisdiction of the new FSGG Subcommittee is a combination of agencies from the jurisdiction of three previously existing subcommittees. Most of the agencies that had been under the jurisdiction of the Transportation, Treasury, the Judiciary, and Housing and Urban Development, and Related Agencies Subcommittee were assigned to the FSGG subcommittee.1114 In addition, the District of Columbia, which had its own subcommittee in the 109th Congress, was placed under the purview of the FSGG Subcommittee, as were four independent agencies that had been under the jurisdiction of the Commerce, Justice, Science, and Related Agencies Subcommittee: the FCC, FTC, SEC, and SBA. As a result of this reorganization, the House and Senate FSGG Subcommittees have nearly identical jurisdictions, except that the CFTC is under the jurisdiction of the FSGG Subcommittee in the Senate and the Agriculture Subcommittee in the House.

CRS FSGG Appropriations Experts

Table 4below lists various departments and agencies funded through FSGG appropriations and the names and contact information of the CRS expert(s) on these departments and agencies.

Table 4. CRS Financial Services and General Provisions Government-Wide5. CRS FSGG Appropriations Experts

[phone number scrubbed]

 

[author name scrubbed]

Area of Expertise

Name

Phone

Email

Coordinator

[author name scrubbed]

[phone number scrubbed]

[email address scrubbed]

Department of the Treasury

[author name scrubbed]

[phone number scrubbed]

[email address scrubbed]

Executive Office of the President

[author name scrubbed]

[phone number scrubbed]

[email address scrubbed]

Judiciary

Matt Glassman

Barry McMilion

[phone number scrubbed]

[email address scrubbed]

District of Columbia

[author name scrubbed]

[phone number scrubbed]

[email address scrubbed]

Commodity Futures Trading Commission

[author name scrubbed]

[phone number scrubbed]

[email address scrubbed]

Consumer Product Safety Commission

[author name scrubbed]

[phone number scrubbed]

[email address scrubbed]

Cuba

Mark Sullivan

[phone number scrubbed]

[email address scrubbed]

Federal Communications Commission

Patty Figliola

[phone number scrubbed]

[email address scrubbed]

Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation: OIG

[author name scrubbed]

[phone number scrubbed]

[email address scrubbed]

 

[author name scrubbed]

[phone number scrubbed]

[email address scrubbed]

Federal Election Commission

[author name scrubbed]

[phone number scrubbed]

[email address scrubbed]

Federal Labor Relations Authority

David Bradley

[phone number scrubbed]

[email address scrubbed]

Federal Trade Commission

[author name scrubbed]

[phone number scrubbed]

[email address scrubbed]

General Services Administration

[author name scrubbed]

[phone number scrubbed]

[email address scrubbed]

Government-wide General Provisions

Barbara Schwemle

[phone number scrubbed]

[email address scrubbed]

Internal Revenue Service

[author name scrubbed]

[phone number scrubbed]

[email address scrubbed]

Merit Systems Protection Board

Barbara Schwemle

[phone number scrubbed]

[email address scrubbed]

National Archives and Records Administration

Meghan Stuessy

[email address scrubbed]

National Credit Union Administration

Darryl Getter

[phone number scrubbed]

[email address scrubbed]

Office of Personnel Management

Barbara Schwemle

[phone number scrubbed]

[email address scrubbed]

Office of Special Counsel

Barbara Schwemle

[phone number scrubbed]

[email address scrubbed]

Securities and Exchange Commission

[author name scrubbed]

[phone number scrubbed]

[email address scrubbed]

Small Business Administration

Robert Dilger

[phone number scrubbed]

[email address scrubbed]

U.S. Postal Service

Michelle Christensen

Office of Government Ethics

Jacob Straus

[phone number scrubbed]

[email address scrubbed]

Privacy and Civil Liberties Oversight Board

[author name scrubbed]

[phone number scrubbed]

[email address scrubbed]

Securities and Exchange Commission

[author name scrubbed]

[phone number scrubbed]

[email address scrubbed]

Selective Service System

Kristy Kamarck

[phone number scrubbed]

[email address scrubbed]

Small Business Administration

Robert Dilger

[phone number scrubbed]

[email address scrubbed]

[author name scrubbed]

[phone number scrubbed]

[email address scrubbed]

U.S. Postal Service

Michelle Christensen

[phone number scrubbed]

[email address scrubbed]

United States Tax Court

[phone number scrubbed]

[email address scrubbed]

Author Contact Information

[author name scrubbed], Specialist in Financial Economics ([email address scrubbed], [phone number scrubbed])

Footnotes

For a more complete discussion regarding the funding of financial regulators see, CRS Report R43391, Independence of Federal Financial Regulators: Structure, Funding, and Other Issues, by [author name scrubbed], [author name scrubbed], and [author name scrubbed].

1.

These provisions typically appear in Title I due to the Department of Treasury's role in sanctions enforcement. See CRS Report R44822, Cuba: U.S. Policy in the 115th Congress, by [author name scrubbed].

2.

The President's budget does not total the requested amounts according to the congressional appropriations structure. This total amount is as reported in H.Rept. 115-234 and H.Rept. 115-232.

3.

U.S. Congress, House Committee on Appropriations, Subcommittee on Financial Services and General Government, Financial Services and General Government Appropriations Bill, 2018, report to accompany H.R. 3280, 115th Cong., 1st sess., July 17, 2017, H.Rept. 115-234 (Washington: GPO, 2017).

4.

U.S. Congress, House Committee on Appropriations, Subcommittee on Agriculture, Rural Development, Food and Drug Administration, and Related Agencies, Agriculture, Rural Development, Food and Drug Administration, and Related Agencies Appropriations Act, 2018, report to accompany H.R. 3268, 115th Cong., 1st sess., July 17, 2017, H.Rept. 115-232 (Washington: GPO, 2017).

5.

House-passed amendments to the FSGG portion of H.R. 3354 included H.Amdt. 429, H.Amdt. 430, H.Amdt. 432, H.Amdt. 439, H.Amdt. 441, H.Amdt. 443, and H.Amdt. 445.

6.

The bill was released by the chairs of both the full committee and the subcommittee. See U.S. Congress, Senate Committee on Banking, Housing, and Urban Affairs, "FY2018 Financial Services & General Government Appropriations Bill Released," press release, November 20, 2017, https://www.appropriations.senate.gov/news/majority/fy2018-financial-services-and-general-government-appropriations-bill-released.

7.

For more information on the CR, see CRS Report R44978, Overview of Continuing Appropriations for FY2018 (P.L. 115-56), coordinated by [author name scrubbed].

8.
69.

For more information, see CRS Report R44046R44958, Insurance Regulation: Background, Overview, and Legislation in the 114th115th Congress, by [author name scrubbed].

710.

P.L. 111-203. See CRS Report R41350, The Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act: Background and Summary, coordinated by [author name scrubbed].

811.

For more information on H.R. 10, see CRS Insight IN10769, Financial Regulation: FY2018 Appropriations and the Financial CHOICE Act (H.R. 10), by [author name scrubbed] and [author name scrubbed]; CRS Insight IN10695, The Financial CHOICE Act (H.R. 10) and the Dodd-Frank Act, by [author name scrubbed],; and CRS Report R44839, The Financial CHOICE Act in the 115th Congress: Selected Policy Issues, by [author name scrubbed] et al.

912.

These regulators include the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, the Federal Housing Finance Agency, the National Credit Union Administration, the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency, and the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System. H.R. 3280 included the National Credit Union Association in the group that would be brought under appropriations, but the NCUA language was removed in the floor consideration of H.R. 3354 with the passage of H.Amdt. 443. For more information on financial regulator funding, see CRS Report R43391, Independence of Federal Financial Regulators: Structure, Funding, and Other Issues, by [author name scrubbed], [author name scrubbed], and [author name scrubbed].

1013.

The agencies previously under the jurisdiction of the House Appropriations Subcommittee on Transportation, Treasury, Housing and Urban Development, the Judiciary, the District of Columbia, and Independent Agencies (TTHUD) that did not become part of the FSGG Subcommittee were the Department of Transportation (DOT), the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD), the Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance Board, the Federal Maritime Commission, the National Transportation Safety Board, the Neighborhood Reinvestment Corporation, and the United States Interagency Council on Homelessness.

1114.

The agencies that did not transfer from the Senate Appropriations Subcommittee on Transportation, Treasury, the Judiciary, and Housing and Urban Development, and Related Agencies to FSGG were DOT, HUD, the Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance Board, the Federal Maritime Commission, the National Transportation Safety Board, the Neighborhood Reinvestment Corporation, and the United States Interagency Council on Homelessness.